College of Arts and Sciences

English Graduate Current Courses

Spring 2018 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 400G, TOPICS: The Novel, Narrating Desire

Macomb—W 5:30-8:00 pm—Dr. David Banash

Focusing on marriage plots and changing ideas about love, we will trace the evolution of the novel from the eighteenth century to the contemporary world. Each era conceives of love differently, and each era altered the very form of the novel to narrate new experiences of love and desire: emphatic Romantic sincerity and idealism; the paradox of Victorian realism and sentimentalism; experimental modernist self-consciousness; and the playfulness of postmodern irony. 

Novels will include: Johann von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther; Jane Austen, Mansfield Park; Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita; Angela Carter, The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr. Hoffman.

ENG 540, Literary Traditions: 20th Century Anglophone Poetry

CODEC Macomb and Quad Cities—M 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Magdelyn Helwig

“Make it new”: Ezra Pound’s famous dictum is inextricably linked to Modernism but can productively apply to a critical review of all of 20th century Anglophone poetry. During the 20th century, poets initiated wide-ranging, radical aesthetic experiments leading to multiple, interconnected poetic traditions that test and stretch the limits of poetry, and in this class, we will trace those trajectories—Imagism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat movement, the New York school, the Confessionals, Black Arts, the Language school, New Formalism, among others—in conversation with the larger cultural movements that influenced them.

Readings: We’ll begin our survey of 20th–century Anglophone poetry in the 19th century with a little Whitman, Dickinson, and Hopkins, after which we will dive into the high, late, and transitional Modernists (Auden, Berryman, Bishop, Brown, Crane, Cummings, Eliot, Frost, Gunn, H.D., Hughes, Lowell, Loy, McKay, Millay, Moore, Oppen, Owen, Pound, Roethke, Sandburg, Stein, Stevens, Thomas, Toomer, Williams, and Yeats) and the Postmodernists (Ai, Ammons, Ashbery, Baraka, Brooks, Carson, Creeley, Dickey, Dove, Ginsberg, Glück, Heaney, Hejinian, Hughes, Larkin, Lee, Levertov, Levine, Lorde, Merrill, O’Hara, Koch, Komunyakaa, Plath, Rich, Rukeyser, Sexton, Snyder, Walcott, and [C. D. and James] Wright). We will also read seminal critical essays by Houston Baker, Harold Bloom, Bonnie Costello, Rachel DuPlessis, T.S. Eliot, Jerome McGann, Cary Nelson, Marjorie Perloff, Robert Pinsky, John Crowe Ransom, Thomas Travisano, and Helen Vendler.

ENG 549, Issues in Literary Studies: Queer Reading Practices: American Novels

 Macomb —TH 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Merrill Cole

This seminar interrogates what queer reading means, examining American novels that prominently feature non-normative sexualities, and non-normative gender identities and expressions. Alternative representations of sex and gender proliferated during the twentieth century, as writers attempted variously to defend, celebrate, problematize, or explain newly visible forms of difference. This seminar attends to novels strange not only in topic, but also in form. That is to say, novels that are themselves more than a bit peculiar, queerly askew of the narrative norm, stylistically conforming to nonconformist subject material, or twisted by the strange material they attempt to present objectively. At issue is the extent to which non-normative sexuality and gender influences formal innovation, what unconventional sexualities have to do with new literary practices. These novels raise important questions about what it means to be a woman or a man, what counts as obscene, what should or shouldn’t be hidden, what happens when moral judgments become oppressive, and what human freedom means. We will also consider the intersections of our texts with such historically concurrent narratives as feminism, colonialism, commodity capitalism, and racial otherness.

In this seminar, it is not just a question of interpreting queer texts, but of learning how to queer reading. For this, we will first turn to Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s foundational 1990 Epistemology of the Closet, which launched a distinctly queer mode of reading still being used, developed, and contested today. As we read through the novels (in chronological order), we will look at other queer reading strategies, including those related directly to the novels. Students should take advantage of the opportunity at the end of the semester to queer the 20-page term paper.

Textbooks

  • Baldwin, James. Giovanni’s Room. IBSN: 0345806565
  • Barnes, Djuna. Nightwood. ISBN: 0811216713
  • Bechtel, Alison. Funhome. ISNB: 978-0618871711
  • Burroughs, William S. Naked Lunch. IBSN: 0802122078
  • Capote, Truman. Other Voices, Other Rooms. ISBN: 0679745645
  • Faulkner, William. Absalom, Absalom! IBSN: 978-0679732181
  • Feinberg, Leslie. Stone Butch Blues. IBSN: 1555838537
  • Larson, Nella. Passing. IBSN: 978-0142437278
  • Rechy, John. City of Night. ISBN: 0802121535
  • Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Epistemology of the Closet. ISBN: 978-0520254060
  • Womack, Craig. Drowning in Fire. IBSN: 978-0816521685
ENG 549, Issues in Literary Studies: The New Postcritical Programs and Inegalitarianism

Quad Cities—TH 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Dan Malachuk

Deep into the twentieth century, literary critics in the West taught a “humanist” canon that celebrated modern revolutionary values (liberty, equality, fraternity) and condemned not only the original systems (feudalism, plantation slavery) that opposed those values but subsequent ones (fascism, totalitarian communism, capitalist liberalism) that betrayed them.  In the 1970s, though, humanism suffered two major crises, and this seminar examines how literary critics have responded, especially lately. 

The first late-century crisis was philosophical:  “Theory” deflated those old revolutionary values and taught us to “critique” any literary puffery about such.  Forty years later, though, many literary critics have wearied of “symptomatic readings” sponsored by a “hermeneutics of suspicion,” and this seminar will review the “postcritical” alternatives urged in books like Felski’s The Limits of Critique (2015).  

The other late-century crisis was a toxic inegalitarianism that energized (in the case of U.S., for example) one side of a new culture war.  The old humanist canon proved a little wobbly against these more specific identity-based assaults, but, unlike with the first crisis, the solution was formulated quickly: expand the canon.  The result has been (again in the U.S.) that voting-age citizens age sixty or younger have all been officially instructed from kindergarten through high school or even college to value all people equally.  And yet, in November 2016 a majority of these same people—the white ones at least—nonetheless supported a Presidential candidate who gleefully renounced this value.  And that was just the start:  in the months since, white identitarians, manospherists, aggrieved “Christians” and others have flooded the public sphere with brazenly inegalitarian demands not heard since the 1960s.

So, among the ballyhooed postcritical programs in literary studies today, are any being theorized to challenge this new inegalitarianism?  We’ll investigate.  Books are still to be selected. 

ENG 679, Study Abroad: Cinema Italiano

Macomb —Arranged, meets April 2-May 30—Dr. Roberta Di Carmine 

Travel to Rome and Torino with your film Professor, an Italian native speaker, for a full immersion in Italian cinema and culture. You will have a unique experience studying films, visiting film studios, film archives, and exploring locations used by directors both Italian and American in their cultural portrayals of Italy and Italians. 

Class will meet in Macomb throughout April, and travel to Italy May 16th to May 30th. 

Registration requires approval of the Director of Graduate Studies in English. 

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Fall 2017 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 400G: TOPICS: Science Fiction

Quad Cities—TH 12:30-3:00 pm—Dr. Everett Hamner

Description: Many Americans derive their notions of science fiction from Hollywood blockbusters that prominently feature exploding spaceships, damsels in distress, and alien horrors. These are a real part of science fiction’s history, but they are only a part. This course will feature texts utilizing but also repurposing such motifs, and in the process may surprise many participants with the diverse range of literary subgenres that have been defined as and influenced by science fiction, including the gothic, horror, magical realism, and other branches of the fantastic.

Our semester is divided into two overlapping but distinct movements. The first, chronologically-organized section will provide a tour of the history of science fiction guided by the very recent Routledge Concise History of Science Fiction, while also beginning to take advantage of the best sf short story anthology to date, The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. This segment of the course will provide a sense of both continuity and transformation, both in American culture and in sf. After we become familiar with the tendencies of early sf, the pulps, the golden age, the new wave, and late-century cyberpunk, the course’s second, thematically-driven section will focus upon key sf subgenres and seven of its most significant traits (drawing especially on work by Istvan Csicsery-Ronay, Jr.). In this phase, we will consider the implications of time travel and alternate histories, the allegories involved in alien contact narratives and post/apocalyptic fiction, and the impacts of biotechnology, new media, and climate change. Here we are likely to sample sf novels by golden-age master Arthur C. Clarke, new-wave icon Octavia Butler, and one of the most influential living sf writers, Kim Stanley Robinson.

Coursework will include relatively heavy but often very entertaining reading, reading comprehension quizzes, multiple argumentative papers, and a unique recommended-novel expansion project that involves both creative and critical writing.

ENG 400G: TOPICS: African-American Writers

Macomb—T/TH 2:00-3:15 pm—Dr. Pat Young

Description: A survey of African American Writers.  Featured authors include writers from the periods of Emancipation and Freedom, the literature of the Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance and  authors from the Renaissance up to the Contemporary period.  Specific writers will be announced.

ENG 489G: Grant and Proposal Writing

Macomb & Quad CitiesM 5:30-8:00 PM—Dr. Neil Baird & Staff

Description: I’m very excited to be teaching this course! Grant writing is becoming more and more important as more and more funding takes a competitive approach. The old model—“Here’s your money”—is being replaced with “Show me you deserve some money.” That’s where grants come in. You’ll see several expressions of this shift many of our readings. This semester, I hope that all of us will gain skills, experience, and knowledge we can use in future grant-writing endeavors. Like all writing, grant writing differs widely between disciplines and contexts—the process, rhetoric, genre, and content of a National Science Foundation (NSF) small business innovation grant is very different than a community education grant written for the Illinois Humanities Council (IHC). We’ll discuss not only the elements of grant writing which are more universal than others, but those particular to the grants we’ve written and want to write.

Course Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of typical grant submission writing processes.
  2. Learn principles of grant and proposal writing which transcend disciplinary structures.
  3. Learn to read requests for proposals and prepare checklists and planning documents based upon them.
  4. Draft a grant proposal which answers a self-selected request for proposals.
  5. Consider the position of grant and proposal writing in professional writing, a sub-discipline of writing studies.

You can expect to research, prepare for, write, and manage a grant proposal targeting a grant program you select. Past students who have submitted their grants upon completion of the course have been very successful, receiving travel funding for archival research and funding to improve small business and nonprofit organizations.

Course Texts:

  • Karsh, E. & Fox, A. S. (2009). The Only Grant-writing Book You’ll Ever Need: Top Grant Writers and Grant Givers Share Their Secrets, 3rd ed. New York: Basic Books. ISBN 978-0465018697
  • O’Neal-McElrath, T. (2013). Winning Grants Step By Step, 4th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley/Blackwell. ISBN 978-1118378342
ENG 494G: Women in Film and Television

Macomb: M/W 9:00-9:50am & M 10-11:50 Screening—Dr. Roberta Di Carmine

Description: We will look at a diverse body of US and international films and television shows that have women behind the camera and on screen and explore different representations of agency and identity of women in media. Although the focus will be on depictions of women, we will also examine representations of masculinity in relation to the male gaze, pleasure and spectatorship. Some of the key questions that will be addressed are: what strategies do US and international filmmakers employ to tell “women’s stories”? To what extent these texts challenge traditional gender paradigms and power relations? And, how do filmmakers challenge narrative conventions and generic constructions of gender? Ultimately, in this course we will develop and refine critical thinking and acquire a critical basis in discussing visual texts.

Assignments for graduate students: In-class activities (film reviews/screening reports), a presentation, four short papers, a final research paper.  Attendance at film screenings is mandatory,

Films and TV shows include: 
Adam’s Rib (1949, US); All About Eve (1950, US);
 All About My Mother (1999, Spain);
 Southern Comfort (2001, US);
 The Crying Game (1992, dir. Neil Jordan. UK/Japan/US); Marie Antoinette (2006, dir. Sofia Coppola. US/France/Japan); Enchanted (2007, dir. Kevin Lima. US); The Mary Tyler Moore Show; Gilmore Girls

ENG 500: Theory and Practice of English Studies

CODEC Macomb and Quad Cities—W 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. David Banash

Description: English Studies is a vast, anarchic field of intellectual inquiry that includes a dizzying array of possibilities: the novel, drama, poetry, the essay, the short story, film, new media, text/image theory, composition studies, technical writing, linguistics, literary theory, cultural studies, gender studies, queer theory, postcolonial literatures and theory, publishing, the history of the book, rhetoric, and of course all the national literatures written in English anywhere in the world. Even this partial list gives only a vague idea of the possibilities, and as a graduate student in English one of the great challenges and delights is exploring these areas and defining yourself as an intellectual within them. Despite the scope of the field, all these areas of inquiry demand intense, informed, subtle reading and interpretation conveyed in precise and limpid prose. This section of English 500 will focus on the questions of reading and interpretation. We will explore fundamental philosophical and critical backgrounds including theories of the sign, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, psychoanalysis, and feminism. We will do so with the goal of becoming deeper, more informed, self-reflective and critical readers. The goal of this course is cultivating the skills and practices to read successfully in any area of English studies. We will develop our reading by writing throughout the semester, producing short papers that emphasize accurate summary, concise formulation, and the development of a critical voice.

Required texts will include:

  • Daniel Chandler. Semiotics: The Basics
  • Sigmund Freud. Civilization and Its Discontents.
  • Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook 8th ed.
  • Karl Marx. The Communist Manifesto and Other Revolutionary Writings.
  • Rivkin and Ryan. Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd ed.
ENG 530: Forms: Forms of Shakespeare

CODEC—Macomb & Quad Cities TH 5:30-8:00 PM—Dr. Chris Morrow

Description: This course will examine the many forms which Shakespeare and his plays take.  Despite the common and simplistic refrain that Shakespeare's plays were meant for and should only be enjoyed on the stage, theatrical production accounts for only one form in which these plays have been produced and encountered.  We will consider forms of Shakespeare from the Renaissance to today -- including early printed editions, theatrical productions, and films as well as modern adaptations which shift medium to fiction, graphic novels and even games.   Not concerned with impossible-to-defend notions of authenticity or fidelity, we will examine common texts across a variety of forms -- allowing us to study form as much as we are studying Shakespeare. 

Side Note: This will probably be a fairly Hamlet-heavy course though I suspect other plays will also make appearances.

ENG 580: Teaching Assistants Colloquium

Macomb—Tu 5:30-8pmMagdelyn Helwig

Description: In this course, we will explore composition theory and pedagogy, classroom practices, and the “nuts and bolts” of teaching college composition. Class will serve as a guide during your first semester of teaching English 180, but also as a foundation for future college- level teaching.

Teaching Method: Class will be discussion-based with practice in application of pedagogical concepts.

Assignments: Weekly reading responses, periodic pedagogical assignments, professional documents, and online teaching portfolio.

Textbooks:

  • Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies (Addler-Kastner and Wardle),
  • Engaging Ideas (Bean),
  • The St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing (Glenn and Goldwaite),
  • The Longman Teaching Assistant’s Handbook (Wilhoit).

Permissions: Approval must be granted by Writing Program Director or Graduate Director.

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Summer 2017 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 492G: Religion, Literature, and Film

CODEC Quad Cities & Macomb—M/T/W/TH 1:00-2:50 pm 6-Week Summer Session, June 5th-July 14th—Dr. Everett Hamner

Description: This course pursues the unique insights contemporary fiction and film offer for understanding world religions and spiritualities. What do such narratives suggest about similarities and differences between Midwestern Protestantism and New York City Judaism, or between Islam in Iran and indigenous spirituality in New Zealand? Conversely, the course considers the significance of religious and secular questions for understanding literary and filmic characters and plots. What can grasping concepts of Hinduism or Taoism, for instance, reveal about an Oscar-winning film or a major science fiction novel? Many of our texts represent a subgenre we might call the spiritual bildungsroman: while these works often feature relatively young protagonists, they always revolve around quests for personal maturity and communal meaning. Among their many concerns are the ways different traditions regard the relationship between believing something, knowing it, and acting upon it. In some cases faith seems unrelated to or counter to knowledge or action, but in others these categories are virtually inseparable. Another common characteristic of the world literature and cinema we will survey is the way it breaks down assumptions about what counts as religious or secular in the first place. As supplemental theoretical and historical readings will demonstrate, the relationships between the holy and the profane, the material and the immaterial, and the actual and the imaginary differ considerably according to cultural contexts. In fact, by course’s end we should find ourselves asking whether there actually is anything purely religious or secular, at least in the ways we once accepted those terms. As a whole, these novels and films will challenge us to consider how and why human beings are willing to risk their lives for some ideas without requiring proof, while easily dismissing others as irrational. Please note that coursework varies according to undergraduate or graduate status. While all students will complete substantial reading and viewing, several quizzes, and a substantial argumentative research paper, graduate students will complete additional reading, facilitate one discussion, and write longer papers. Further details may be found in the reading schedule and assignment overviews below.

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Spring 2017 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 401G: Major Authors

TOPIC: Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance

Macomb—T/TH 9:30-10:45am—Dr. Pat Young

Aim: ​A study of some of the major female writers of the Harlem Renaissance and of the various themes they addressed and of the various genres in which they wrote. Featured writers include but are not restricted to Angelina Weld Grimke, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Marita Bonner, and Jessie Fauset.

ENG 481G: Topics in Writing Studies

TOPIC: Feminist Activism in Communities of Writing

Macomb and QC CODEC—T 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Rebekah Buchanan

Aim: This course will explore how women develop and use rhetoric and writing to challenge and change their worlds. We will evaluate how women use rhetoric in the public, private, and electronic spheres to create change. We will start with a grounding in feminist theory to situate discussion around feminist rhetorical practices in writing communities.

Texts:

      1. Feminist Rhetorical Practices: New Horizons for Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies (Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms) by Jacqueline Jones Royster and Gesa E Kirsch
      2. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
ENG 500 : Film Theory

TOPIC: Film Theory

QC and Macomb CODEC—W 5:30-8:00—Dr. Richard Ness

Aims: This course will provide an overview of the major theoretical approaches that have emerged in the aesthetic and technological development of film as a medium and an art form. Students will read and analyze the work of significant theorists, including Rudolf Arnheim, Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfried Kracauer, Andre Bazin, Christian Metz, Roland Barthes, Laura Mulvey, and others, as well as screen representative films. Among the theoretical concepts that will be addressed are various realist and formalist approaches, semiotics, Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, genre, auteurism/authorship, and the relation of film to other arts.

ENG 559: Issues in Disciplinary Studies

TOPIC: Literature, Medicine, Personhood, and Knowledge

QC and Macomb CODEC—M 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Everett Hamner

Aim : This course explores the intersections between contemporary literature and twenty-first-century biotechnologies, especially those dedicated to medicine and health. US medical schools now routinely feature courses in the “medical humanities,” recognizing that health care improves significantly when fictional and nonfictional narratives help practitioners to empathize more fully with their patients. While powerfully illustrating literature’s value beyond serving individual entertainment, this movement suggests many additional reasons for students of English to attend to these connections.

As the more theoretical contributions to our syllabus will show, literature, cinema, and other popular cultural engagements with biotechnology are redefining Western concepts of personhood, knowledge, and their boundaries. New possibilities for genomic testing, individualized medicine, reproductive decision-making, disease intervention, and physical enhancement have complex implications for our concepts of subjectivity, agency, intuition, and faith. Through television, cinema, drama, nonfiction, the novel, and a wide array of critical and theoretical responses, we will reexamine common assumptions about nature and technology, varieties of human

While this course focuses on theories and narratives about human health, its significance will reach into many other areas. Students will also find much to ponder concerning other species and larger ecological problems, new visions of gender and sexuality, racial and socioeconomic justice, the appeal of post/apocalyptic scenarios, representations of death and definitions of life, and the rise of surveillance culture. My hope is that the final papers emerging from the course will represent an exceedingly wide range of connections between students’ deepest interests and these evocative literary and filmic visions of human health in past, present, and future forms.

Teaching Method: Discussion

Assignments:

      1. Regular annotations of texts and group discussion facilitation
      2. Routine reading/viewing comprehension quizzes
      3. Final paper and presentation

Tentative Reading (and Viewing) List*

(*please note the emphasis on “tentative”—this course is very much still under construction, and student interests expressed in the weeks ahead will shape the final schedule of readings and viewings)

      1. Short stories by Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, Steve Tomasula, and Alexander Weinstein
      2. A play by Margaret Edson and its film adaptation
      3. Personal essays by Richard Powers and Marilynne Robinson
      4. Literary theory and criticism by Donna Haraway, N. Katherine Hayles, Susan Squier, Stacy Alaimo, Janet Fiskio, Gerry Canavan, Priscilla Wald, Michael Kaufmann, and Lori Branch
      5. Novels by Kazuo Ishiguro, Richard Powers, and Don Delillo
      6. Popular television and film including Orphan Black, Black Mirror, and Moon

Prerequisites: Graduate status

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Fall 2016 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 500: Theory and Practice of English Studies

Macomb and QC—M 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. David Banash

Aim: English Studies is a vast, anarchic field of intellectual inquiry that includes a dizzying array of possibilities: the novel, drama, poetry, the essay, the short story, film, new media, text/image theory, composition studies, technical writing, linguistics, literary theory, cultural studies, gender studies, queer theory, postcolonial literatures and theory, publishing, the history of the book, rhetoric, and of course all the national literatures written in English anywhere in the world. Even this partial list gives only a vague idea of the possibilities, and as a graduate student in English one of the great challenges and delights is exploring these areas and defining yourself as an intellectual within them. Despite the scope of the field, all these areas of inquiry demand intense, informed, subtle reading and interpretation conveyed in precise and limpid prose. This section of English 500 will focus on the questions of reading and interpretation. We will explore fundamental philosophical and critical backgrounds including theories of the sign, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, psychoanalysis, and feminism. We will do so with the goal of becoming deeper, more informed, self-reflective and critical readers. The goal of this course is cultivating the skills and practices to read successfully in any area of English studies. We will develop our reading by writing throughout the semester, producing short papers that emphasize accurate summary, concise formulation, and the development of a critical voice.

Required texts will include:

      1. Daniel Chandler. Semiotics: The Basics
      2. Sigmund Freud. Civilization and Its Discontents.
      3. Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers 7th ed.
      4. Karl Marx. The Communist Manifesto and Other Revolutionary Writings.
      5. Rivkin and Ryan. Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd ed.
      6. Steve Tomasula. The Book of Portraiture.
ENG 536: Critical and Theoretical Movements in Literary Studies

TOPIC: New Historicism

Macomb—W 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Jose Fernandez

Aim: This course will focus on the emergence of New Historicism as a theoretical method of literary analysis and as a movement in the history of literary studies beginning in the 1980s. New Historicism evolved in part as a reaction to New Criticism and “old historicist” approaches to literary texts. New Historicism and its emphasis on the interweaving of social, cultural, and economic dynamics and structures shaping aesthetic and literary productions have been integrated into the scholarship of diverse literary periods such as romanticism and modernism. This course will concentrate on the emergence, incorporation, and challenge of New Historicist interpretations in the study of late 19th century and early 20th century American realist and naturalist authors such as Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, and Jack London. Our list of readings will include literary scholars who have developed or incorporated New Historicist approaches to the study of realist and naturalist authors such as Walter Benn Michaels, Donald Pizer, Amy Kaplan, Richard Lehan, Donna Campbell, Bert Bender, and Eric Carl Link.

ENG 536: Critical and Theoretical Movements in Literary Studies

TOPIC: Liberal Humanism

QC—W 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Dan Malachuk

Aim: Focusing on liberal humanism, especially the major critiques as well as its recent resurgence in relation to author intention, canonicity, beauty, and pastoralism/sustainability.

Tentative Reading List:

      1. On Beauty and Being Just by Elaine Scarry
      2. Several other books to be determined
ENG 589: Issues in Writing Studies

TOPIC: What is Writing?

Macomb and QC—Th 5:30-8:00pm—Dr. Bill Knox

Aim: The title of Peter Elbow’s collection of essays from the pre-Internet era boldly asks, “What Is English?” Fall semester—now well into the Information Age--we will study and write toward a tentative answer to another bold question “What is writing?” Through a series of readings, class discussion will focus on accounting for the many activities and products we call “writing.” Touching on processes, the role of talk, theory of knowledge, social roles, the individual, and virtual texts, course content will explore definitions of this most human of activities while suggesting how we might apply these definitions to critical reading, our own writing, editing, and teaching. In the process, you will consider the aspects of writing most useful to your own studies as you prepare to write, teach, and construct new knowledge about this very common but taken-for-granted term. Even though many of our readings will come from Villanueva and Arola's Cross Talk in Comp Theory, the course will take a decidedly more philosophical turn in its readings and writings as we consider writing in it's many given transactional roles but also in its artistic ones to arrive at some tentative answers to another more searching question, "Can we be human without writing?"

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Summer 2016 Graduate Course Schedule

ENG 401G: Major Authors

TOPIC: Emerson, Whitman, and Dickinson

QC and Macomb—First Four Weeks—Dr. Dan Malachuk

Aim: This course will explore the major works of and relationships between Emerson, Whitman, and Dickinson.The central concerns of Emerson (1803-1882) - the nature of the self and its relations to society, nature, and a higher "Self" - were also those of two of his greatest readers, the poets Walt Whitman (1819-1892) and Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). With the assistance of recent scholarship on cosmopolitanism, environmentalism, post-secularity, and influence theory, this course will take up these and related topics as handled by these three major authors.

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