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History participants in Spring 2008 Undergraduate Research Day

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Abby Lagemann chats with guest speaker and WIU History alum Steve Catania

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Rob Ramaker and Myles Cameron with the small ballista

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HISTORY MAJORS PRESENT AT UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH DAY

Apr 16, 2008

Eleven History majors, mentored by four History professors, presented their research at WIU's Sixth Annual Undergraduate Research Day on Wednesday, April 16 at the University Union. In addition, the Distinguished Alumni Presentation that day was given by History Department Alumnus Steve Catania, a Ph.D. student at Loyola University who earned his BA in History from WIU and his MA in Social Science (History) from the University of Chicago. He presented "Undergraduate Research: A Retrospective."

Two History majors were chosen to make podium presentations. Andrea Van Drew presented her research on "The Colosseum as an Enduring Icon of Rome: A Comparison of the Colosseum and Circus Maximus," completed under the mentorship of Associate Professor of History Lee Brice, at 12:30 p.m. in the University Union's Vandalia Room. Ms. Van Drew won a Norman and Carmelita Teeter Research Grant from the College of Arts and Sciences and a Department of History Undergraduate Research Award for this project. Alex Heuer, holder of a Charles Sadler History Memorial Scholarship, presented his research on "Seizing the Airwaves: A Brief History of Tri State Public Radio," completed under the direction of Associate Professor of History Greg Hall, at 2:30 in the Vandalia Room.

In addition, nine History students participated in the Poster Presentations portion of Undergraduate Research Day, held in the Union's Grand Ballroom from 12:15 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 16. Abby Lagemann, mentored by Assistant Professor of History Jennifer McNabb, presented her research on "Public Punishment in Early Modern England," featuring her re-creations of early modern methods of judicial punishment: the stocks and the pillory. Ms. Lagemann, holder of an Emily Leonard History Memorial Scholarship, won a Norman and Carmelita Teeter Research Grant from the College of Arts and Sciences and a Department of History Undergraduate Research Award for this project. Jennifer Madgiak presented a portion of her Undergraduate Honors Thesis, completed under the direction of Associate Professor of History Walter Kretchik, including the results of her investigation into the question, "Did the Foreign Policies of the US and the USSR from 1945 to 1980 affect the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-1988?"

Seven students who were mentored by Associate Professor Lee Brice participated in the poster presentations. Myles Cameron and Rob Ramaker won Undergraduate Research Grants from the College of Art and Sciences and the History Department for their research involving the ballista, an ancient Roman siege engine. Mr. Cameron studied "Maneuvering and Tactics of Siege Engines in Ancient Rome," and Mr. Ramaker worked on "Reconstructing Roman Siege Machines and Practices." Dr. Brice's other students included Adam Bednar, whose research examines "The Red Army at Stalingrad, April 1941 to January 1943," and Mallorie Clark, an Emily Leonard History Memorial Scholarship winner, who will present her research on "Reflections of Faith: Comparing Church Architecture." In addition, Daniel Criscione's presentation will be "The Hard Goodbye: Toyotomi Hideyoshi's Invasion of Korea in 1592," Tim Mclouth will present his research on "The French Army Under General Petain and Nivelle's Command during World War I, 1914-1918," and Carl Spath's research presentation will focus on "How Russia Engulfed an Army: Napoleon's Russian Campaign of 1812."

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