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Dr. McNabb demonstrates the pillory built by Abby Lagemann

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Abby Lagemann demonstrates the stocks she built

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Abby Lagemann's pillory

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ABBY LAGEMANN IN WESTERN SCAI

May 25, 2008

Senior Honors History-Teacher Education major Abby Lagemann of Pittsfield, holder of an Emily Leonard Memorial Scholarship in History, and Assistant Professor of History Dr. Jennifer McNabb were selected to participate in the WIU College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) 2008 "Western Summer Creative Activity Institute" (Western SCAI), one part of the College's ongoing commitment to fostering undergraduate research activity. Ms. Lagemann's Western SCAI Award, one of only five awarded by the College, funded her summer research project, an outgrowth of her Honors thesis research on crime and punishment in early modern England. This Summer she analyzed the records of assize justices (circuit court judges who presided over felony trials) during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. Ms. Lagemann's SCAI research focused on punishments and their meanings, for both the community and the state, to determine if the goal for the public punishment of criminals was to reform private conduct or to exercise authority in early modern English society. Her research in these primary sources allowed her to evaluate the theory of Michel Foucault, in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Modern Prison, that that the advent of modern incarceration represented a new emphasis on rehabilitation.

As one of the CAS students chosen to participate in the 2008 Western SCAI program, Ms. Lagemann received tuition and fees for one semester hour for Summer 2008. She and her mentor, Dr. McNabb, participated in several meetings involving all Western SCAI participants, and Ms. Lagemann will participate in Western's Spring 2009 Undergraduate Research Day. Ms. Lagemann has previously been awarded CAS and Department of History Undergraduate Research Grants, as well as being the recipient of a prestigious Norman and Carmelita Teeter Research Grant from the College of Arts and Sciences. She participated in the University's Spring 2008 Undergraduate Research Day in April, and in early May demonstrated for the University community the stocks and the pillory that she built with support from her Undergraduate Research Grants.

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