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HISTORY MAJORS PRESENT RESEARCH AT PHI ALPHA THETA CONFERENCE

Apr 7, 2008

Four WIU History majors presented papers based on their original historical research at the Spring 2008 Regional Phi Alpha Theta (History Honorary Society) Conference in Terre Haute, Indiana. The WIU contingent won the Conference Award for Furthest Distance Traveled.

Two of the undergraduates had been awarded prestigious Norman and Carmelita Teeter Research Grants by the College of Arts and Sciences as well as Department of History Undergraduate Research Awards, to fund their presentations at the April 2008 conference. Andrea Van Drew, of Chadwick, was awarded a $300 Teeter Research Grant and a $75 History Undergraduate Research Award to support her research presentation, "Blood, Politics, and Religion: The Colosseum as an Enduring Icon of Rome"; Ms. Van Drew was mentored by Dr. Lee Brice, Associate Professor of History at WIU.

Abby Lagemann, originally from Pittsfield, was also awarded a $300 Teeter Research Grant and a $75 History Undergraduate Research Award to help defray the costs of her presentation, "Judicial Punishment in Elizabethan England." Ms. Lagemann's faculty mentor for this project was Dr. Jennifer McNabb, Assistant Professor of History at WIU.

Also presenting at the Conference was Myles Cameron, of Edwardsville, who had been awarded a $300 College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Activity Grant and a $75 Department of History Undergraduate Research Award for this presentation. His paper, "Seeking Sorceresses: Torture and its Effects on Witchcraft Prosecutions in Early Modern Scotland" was based on the research he completed under the mentorship of Dr. McNabb.

Presenting in the graduate category at the conference was WIU History Department alumna, Ashley Eberle, of Spring Grove, mentored by Dr. Virginia Boynton, Professor of History and Interim Department Chair. Ms. Eberle graduated summa cum laude in December 2007 as the History Department's "Department Scholar" and as the "College Scholar" of the Centennial Honors College; she was also chosen as the University's Commencement Speaker for the December 2007 Commencement Ceremony. Ms. Eberle's presentation, "Creating Solidarity Through Structure: The Organization of the Chicago Women's Liberation Union, 1969-1977," was based on her research for the Honors Thesis she completed in 2007 under the direction of Dr. Boynton.

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