Department of Physics

Department News

Colloquium Speaker: Dr. Jacob Burress

Oct 15, 2012

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM
Speaker: Dr. Jacob Burress
Date: Friday, October 19
Time: 4 PM
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Carbon Capture and Sequestration through Advanced Nanostructured Materials

Abstract:


One promising avenue of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) research is the use of adsorbent-based storage materials. A better understanding of the physical behavior of adsorbed carbon dioxide can lead to significant advances in the field of energy research. The focus of this presentation is functionalized carbon nanomaterials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and hybrid carbon-MOF systems (e.g. graphene oxide frameworks). These materials present attractive characteristics for optimization of carbon capture including high surface area, tunable pore structure, inexpensive synthesis, and structural stability. However, to meet the requirements for practical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, CCS materials need to be optimized. CO2 capture is unique because these materials (i) must possess excellent characteristics of good physisorption materials, (ii) have high selectivities for CO2 over other gases and (iii) be adjusted for specific technologies depending upon the application. Advanced neutron scattering techniques can characterize the samples and captured CO2, e.g. for crystalline materials, neutron powder diffraction with in-situ CO2 sorption can determine binding sites.

About the speaker:

Dr. Jacob Burress is an undergraduate alumnus of the Department of Physics, WIU. He currently works as a Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Missouri. He is an applied researcher in the areas of hydrogen and methane storage, carbon capture, and energy-related materials development. This research has included design, synthesis, and characterization of engineered nanospace materials. Areas of characterization focus include neutron scattering and gas sorption studies.

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