Department of Psychology

Julie C. Herbstrith, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
131G Waggoner Hall
Work: 309/298-1923
Fax: 309/298-2179

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Additional Information

Education:

Majored in psychology at Marian University in Indianapolis, Indiana. Received a master’s degree in psychology from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Received Ph.D. in school psychology at Illinois State University. Dissertation: “A multi-method investigation of pre-service teacher prejudice toward gay and lesbian parents.”

Teaching:

Graduate courses (PSY 585 Psychological Problems of the Child, PSY 591 Behavioral Consultation, PSY 593 Interventions) and undergraduate courses (typically PSY 251 Personality and Adjustment)

Research:

I am interested in both applied and basic research. As a school psychologist, I am interested in training issues in school psychology, school-based interventions for children, and parent training. My primary basic research interests are in the areas of social and personality psychology. Specifically, I am interested in prejudice and personality factors related to it. One research question that I am especially interested in is how people manage their negative attitudes across situations and what kinds of factors elicit prejudicial behavior or lack thereof.

Recent Scholarly Activities:

Herbstrith, J.C., Gadke, D., & Tobin, R.M. (2011, February). School-based group counseling for Autism Spectrum Disorders. Presented at the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Conference in San Francisco, CA.

Herbstrith, J.C. (2011, February). Developing positive home-school relations with gay and lesbian parents. Presented at the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Conference in San Francisco, CA.

Herbstrith, J.C. & Tobin, R.M. (2010). Predicting prejudice based on motivation,
implicit, and explicit attitudes.
Presented at the American Psychological Association (APA) Conference in San Diego, California.

Herbstrith, J.C. & Tobin, R.M. (2010). Attitudes toward gay and lesbian parents. Presented at the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Conference in Chicago, Illinois.