Engineering Technology

Chairperson: Dr. Ray Diez
Office: Knoblauch Hall 135
Telephone: 309/298-1091
Fax: 309/298-1061
Website: www.wiu.edu/engrtech

Faculty: Blue, Diez, Dirksen, Hall, Hunter, Kim, Liu, Obregon, Payne, Runquist, Weiss.

The Department of Engineering Technology offers a Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, a Bachelor of Science in Graphic Communication, and a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management.

The degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology is designed to provide an up-to-date and challenging program in response to continuously changing and sophisticated technology and an increasingly competitive global marketplace. Students learn to organize the available workforce, materials, and equipment to design, construct, operate, maintain, and manage technical engineering projects. Immediately upon graduation, students are ready to take an active role in the processes involved in manufacturing, and to apply technical solutions to the problems that arise in this area. Additional specific objectives include learning and developing problem solving and critical thinking skills that will be needed by successful industrial managers working with technical applications. The program also includes a strong foundation in business management principles and practices. The Manufacturing Engineering Technology program offers students the flexibility to study in one of two areas:

Automation and Robotics: Educates and prepares students to apply advanced production and electronic techniques as engineering solutions to manufacturing problems through the study of electronics, automation, and fluid power systems.

Manufacturing Design and Production: Educates and prepares students to apply advanced production and design techniques as engineering solutions to manufacturing problems through the study of material science, CAD/CAM, and CNC machining.

The degree in Graphic Communication is designed to educate students to apply advanced production and electronic media techniques as a means to create effective communication. The curriculum has a strong core foundation in the development of knowledge and skills associated with design fundamentals. The curriculum combines technical education with instruction in current design and management practices employed in the graphic communication field. Students learn to organize the available workforce, material, and equipment to design, print, manage, and maintain graphic communication projects. Immediately upon graduation, students are ready to take an active role in the processes involved in graphic communication and to apply technical solutions to the problems that arise in this area. Additional specific objectives include learning and developing problem solving and critical thinking skills that will be needed by successful managers working with technical graphic applications.

The degree in Construction Management is designed to educate students to apply advanced materials, construction, and design techniques as solutions to construction problems through the study of construction materials, estimating, surveying, construction management, and architectural drafting. The curriculum combines technical education with instruction in current design and methods employed in the construction field. Students learn to organize the available workforce, materials and equipment to design, manage and support construction projects. Graduates are prepared to take an active role in the process involved in construction and to apply technology solutions to the problems that arise in this field. Additionally, specific objectives include learning and developing problem solving and critical thinking skills that will be needed by successful construction managers working with technical applications. The program offers students the opportunity to select and complete an appropriate minor area of study.

The Department offers minors in Construction Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Graphic Communication, and Industrial Technology.

GradTrac is available to Manufacturing Engineering Technology majors. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College section of the Catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science—Manufacturing Engineering Technology

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering Technology must complete I, II, III, IV, and V. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 124 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 21 s.h.
    MET 105, 241, 345, 448, 493 (9 s.h.)†
  3. Electives
    1. Directed Electives: 21 s.h.
      Choose 21 s.h. from one of the following groups.
      1. Automation and Robotics: MET 271, 281, 344, 356, 372, 385, 472, 477, 481, 487
      2. Design/Production: MET 207, 261, 321, 344, 363, 367, 407, 446, 468, 482
    2. Open Electives in Manufacturing**: 12 s.h.
  4. Other*
    BL 230, 431, or 432: 3 s.h.
    Chem 101: 4 s.h.
    Econ 100, 231, or 232: 3 s.h.
    Mgt 349: 3 s.h.
    HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    Math 128, 137: 6 s.h.
    Phys 114, 115: 8 s.h.
    OM 352: 3 s.h.
    Stat 171: 3 s.h.
  5. Open Electives: 4 s.h.

†MET 493 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

*13 s.h. may count toward the University General Education requirement.

**See the Manufacturing Engineering Technology adviser for list of approved electives.

Bachelor of Science—Graphic Communication

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Graphic Communication must complete I, II, III, IV, V, and VI. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 24 s.h.
    GCOM 211, 217, 312, 313, 417, 493†
  3. Directed Electives: 12 s.h.
    Choose 12 s.h. from the following:
    GCOM 412, 414, 415, 418, 419; MET 344; Other GCOM/MET courses as pre-approved by academic adviser (maximum 3 s.h.)*
  4. Other: 3 s.h.
    ENG 381
    Choose 6 s.h. from the following:
    ARTH 180; ARTS 101, 102, 140; COMM 130, 247, 356; IDT 205, 230, 240; JOUR 121, 233, 331; MKTG 327, 331, 333, 335, 417
  5. Minor: 16 -21 s.h.
  6. Open Electives: 11-16 s.h.

†GCOM 493 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

*See the Graphic Communication adviser for list of approved electives.

Bachelor of Science—Construction Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Construction Management must complete I, II, III, IV, V, and VI. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 30 s.h.
    CSTM 232, 301, 334, 430, 432, 448, 493†; MET 105
  3. Directed Electives: 12 s.h.
    Choose 12 s.h. from the following: CSTM 236, 302, 336, 337, 433; MET 344, 345
  4. Other
    Geol 110*: 4 s.h.
    Math 123*: 3 s.h.
    Mgt 349: 3 s.h.
  5. Minor**: minimum 16 s.h.
  6. Open Electives: 13 s.h.

†CSTM 493 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

*May count toward the University General Education requirement.

**See the Construction Management adviser for a list of recommended minors.

Minors

Minor in Construction Technology: 21 s.h.

  1. Required Courses: 12 s.h.
    CSTM 334, 336, 430; MET 105
  2. Choose 9 s.h. from the following: 9 s.h.
    CSTM 232, 236, 301, 302, 337, 432: MET 344

Minor in Manufacturing Technology: 21 s.h.

  1. Required Courses: 9 s.h.
    MET 105, 241, 345
  2. Choose 12 s.h. from one of the following groups: 12 s.h.
    1. Computer Controlled Manufacturing
      MET 261, 321, 344, 364, 367, 446, 468
    2. Electronic Circuits and Control Systems
      MET 271, 344, 356, 372, 385, 472, 4
    3. Computer Aided Drafting and Design
      MET 207, 344, 406, 407, 482, 486

Minor in Graphic Communication: 21 s.h.

  1. Required Courses:6 s.h.
    GCOM 211, 217
  2. Electives: 15 s.h.
    Select 15 s.h. from any of the following courses:
    GCOM 312, 313, 412, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419; MET 344

Minor in Industrial Technology: 18 s.h.

  1. MET 105: 3 s.h.
  2. EMET Electives in one area of specialization (drafting/design, graphic communication, construction, production, or electronics and process control) as approved by the department academic adviser: 15 s.h.

Course Descriptions

MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (MET)

(Drafting and Design)

105 (cross-listed with ENGR 105) Engineering Graphics/Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD). (3) An introduction to drafting including shape description, geometric construction, orthographic and isometric drawing, sectioning, dimensioning, applied descriptive geometry. Basic dimensioning, tolerancing, and pictorial drawings will be covered. An introduction to the use of computers for design of industrial prints of intermediate complexity. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. IAI: EGR 941; IND 911.

207 (cross-listed with ENGR 207) Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting. (3) Principles and techniques of basic computer aided drafting. An introduction to the components of computer aided drafting including hardware and software. The basic application of software for lettering, multiview drawing, sectional drawing, dimensioning, and pictorial drawing. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 207,407,482 or MET 407, 482. Prerequisite: ENGR/MET 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

406 Production Drawings and Tool Design. (3) Welding and machining drawing; jig and fixture design; utilizing sketching, board drawings, and computer aided drafting. Prerequisites: MET 101 or 105, and MET 207. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

407 Advanced Computer Aided Drafting. (3) The study of graphic presentation, using computer aided drafting software to produce two-dimensional and threedimensional industrial drawings and designs. Prerequisites: MET 207. 2 hrs lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

408 Computer Illustration and Animation. (3) Application of computer techniques used to create technical illustrations and animations for manuals, documents, assembly instructions, and demonstrations using digital models, rendering, and animation methods. Prerequisite: MET 407. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

482 (cross-listed with ENGR 482) Computer Aided Design. (3) The application of computer aided design techniques utilizing industrial software within a minicomputer and workstation environment. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 482. Prerequisite: ENGR/MET 207. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

486 CAD Design for Manufacturing. (3) An advanced study of computer aided design and manufacturing emphasizing industrial standards and CAD/CAM processes. Laboratory experiences will include design for manufacturing in two and three dimensions and solids. Prerequisite: MET 482. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

(Production)

261 Machine Tool Production. (3) The theory and operation of machine tools and precision measuring instruments. Laboratory assignments will involve material removal processes. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

321 Industrial Plastics and Composites Fabrication. (3) The study and application of composite and plastic materials, forming, molding, and other industrial processes. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

363 Geometric Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Metrology. (3) An introduction to the development and practices of dimensional control of industrial drafting as specified by the ANSI standard and the study and application of precision measurement in manufacturing. Prerequisite: MET 105 and 261 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

364 Welding and Casting Processes. (3) Introduction to welding and casting metals. Emphasis of the course will be upon electric arc welding processes and principles involved in molding and pouring molten metals. Laboratory experiments will include electric arc, MIG, and TIG welding processes along with mold making and casting of aluminum parts. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

367 Computer Numerical Controlled Machining. (3) Introductory and advanced applications of numerically controlled machines. Laboratory experiments will include both off line and machine programming of CNC mills and lathes. Prerequisite: MET 261 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

446 (formerly ENGR 343) Material Science. (3) The study of metallurgy, plastics, and ceramics with emphasis on properties, structure, testing, and heat treatment for the design, manufacture, and failure analysis of materials. Stress, strain, and deformation tests will be included. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. IAI: IND 912.

468 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Machining. (3) The study and application of graphics and language based CAM systems for 21/2D machining and 3D surfacing on numerically controlled machines, including cellular production team projects. Prerequisite: MET 207 and 367. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

(Electronics and Process Control)

271 (cross-listed with ENGR 271) Introduction to Electronics. (3) This course provides a comprehensive study of electronic theory, practices, and fundamentals. Laboratory activities explore the underlying principles of DC and AC circuitry through measurement analysis and problem solving strategies. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 271. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

356 Prime Movers and Power Transfer. (3) A study of electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Emphasis upon structural and behavioral characteristics of components used in the generation, transmission, and control of power systems used in contemporary industry. Not open to students with credit in IE&T 256 or 357. Prerequisite: sophomore standing in the department. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

372 Electronic Circuits. (3) Semiconductor circuit systems and analysis and amplification, including operational amplifiers, will be studied as they relate to electronic system design. Computer analysis and design techniques will be used. Prerequisite: MET 271. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

385 (cross-listed with ENGR 385) Digital Logic Industrial Application. (3) A study of logic control systems as they apply to the control of industrial processes. Laboratory exercises will include the design, fabrication, and testing of logic circuits and their application to industrial processes. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 385. Prerequisite: ENGR/MET 271. 2 hrs. lect; 2 hrs. lab.

472 Industrial Electronics. (3) Instruction concerning control systems, their types, and uses, as well as the instrumentation of automation and manufacturing processes. Prerequisite: MET 372 or 385. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

477 (cross-listed with ENGR 477) Process Controllers. (3) Microprocessor and electronic programmable controller architecture and programming as used in the automation of machines and controls. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 477. Prerequisite: ENGR/MET 385 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

487 Auto ID and Industrial Networks. (3) Study of methods and systems used to automatically identify objects and transmit the information throughout a facility. Topics include bar coding, magnetic stripe, radio frequency, data communications, EDI standards, and systems integration. Prerequisite: junior standing. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

(Other Technology Courses)

241 (cross-listed with ENGR 241) Manufacturing Processes. (3) An introduction to production processes in manufacturing industries. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 241. 3 hrs. lect. IAI: IND 913.

281 Introduction to Robotics. (3) An introduction to robotic and control systems in automated manufacturing. Laboratory exercises will include methods of controlling, integrating, and interfacing robots into manufacturing cells. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

293 Industrial Work Experience. (13, repeatable to 3) This course will enable students to gain experience in manufacturing, construction, or graphic communication in a supervised and approved industrial environment. Written weekly reports, along with a final report, are required. Students will be under the general supervision of both the university instructor and the industrial supervisor. Evaluation of each student's work will result from combined observations of all supervisors. This work experience will provide students an opportunity to apply basic industrial skills to the industrial work involved and enable them to better begin to understand the principles to be mastered for more advanced work. Completion of three 40-hour work weeks required for each semester hour of credit. Prerequisites: industrial technology major and permission of instructor.

344 Cost Reduction Practices in Manufacturing. (3) This course covers manufacturing work measurement and methods. The course will focus on the use of standards, value engineering, methods, design, workstation design, time study, ergonomics, and safety. Prerequisite: MET 241 or consent of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

345 (cross-listed with ENGR 345) Quality Engineering. (3) The study of statistical process control of manufacturing processes to include control charts, process capability studies, factorial designed experiments, and trouble shooting of processes. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 345. Prerequisite: junior standing. 3 hrs. lect. IAI: IND 914.

346 Manufacturing Facilities Design and Material Handling. (3) This course covers manufacturing facilities design and material handling. The course will focus on facilities design, equipment, production flow analysis, cost justification, and material handling systems. Students will be involved in case studies, economic models, and problem solving of manufacturing systems. Prerequisite: MET 241 or consent of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

443 Fire Protection Structure and Systems Design. (3) The principles of protection of the structure from fire involvement. Topics include empirical tests, prediction procedures, detection and suppression systems, sprinkler design, and recent innovations. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Open Learning Fire Service Program for inservice fire/safety personnel by the Director of Nontraditional Programs.

444 Fire Dynamics. (3) Fire dynamics is a study of fire propagation phenomenon in both fuel and air regulated phases, e.g. variables in pre- and post-flashover fire development, as well as geometric, material, gaseous, fluid flow, and thermodynamic parameters. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Open Learning Fire Service Program for inservice fire/safety personnel by the Director of Nontraditional Programs.

448 Industrial and Construction Occupational Safety and Health. (3) A study of the Federal OSHA Act as it applies to both industry and construction. Beyond federal regulations, the course includes accident prevention plans, safety education, and documentation preparation. 3 hrs. lect.

481 Advanced Robotic Controls and Application. (3) Experimentation with and an advanced study of robotic theory and application. Emphasis focused upon robotic applications as they relate to the total manufacturing system. Students are involved in centered learning laboratory experiences with multi-axis robots and interfacing components. Prerequisite: MET 281 and 477. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

492 Independent Study. (13, repeatable to 6) Selection, exploration, and solution of a problem in an area of manufacturing engineering technology. Prerequisite: Senior college standing, 26 s.h. of MET coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (312 in 3-hour blocks, repeatable to 12) Off-campus work experience in manufacturing. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; prerequisites as related to the student's technology option selected; ENG 280. A minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA of 2.00 from courses completed within the major, and approval of program coordinator. Graded S/U only.

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION (GCOM)

211 Introduction to Graphic Communication. (3) A study of the graphic communication industries including composition, photoconversion, press work, and finishing operations. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

217 Electronic Desktop Publishing I. (3) A study of terms, programs, and equipment used in electronic desktop publishing. An introduction and exposure to a variety of electronic desktop publishing programs and tools. Emphasis is upon design, layout, and execution of techniques used in publishing. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

312 Color Image and Halftone Scanning. (3) The theory and practice of color, line, and halftone image scanning. Activities include: color separations, corrections, and working with halftones. Prerequisite: GCOM 211. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

313 Graphic Illustration. (3) A study of illustration software with emphasis upon operational skills and techniques used in creating two-dimensional and threedimensional illustrations. Prerequisites: GCOM 211 and basic typing skills. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

412 Digital Image Manipulation. (3) The use of digital image manipulation equipment in creating special effect images. Emphasis will be placed upon advanced color theory, color separation, and digital enhancement. Prerequisite: GCOM 312. 2 hrs. lect; 2 hrs. lab.

414 Advanced Image Transfer and Printing Processes. (3) The study of advanced printing and image transfer systems and processes. Emphasis will be upon supervised experience in a graphic communication lab. Prerequisite: GCOM 313. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

415 Printing Production Management. (3) The study and application of estimation and production practices in the publishing industry. Emphasis will be on methods, planning, production, estimating, and techniques characteristic of the publishing industry. Prerequisites: GCOM 312. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

417 Electronic Desktop Publishing II. (3) Advanced work with electronic desktop publishing programs. Emphasis will be upon advanced design and layout techniques. Projects include multiple page documents, forms, booklets and brochures. Integration of work from multiple software programs will also be stressed. Prerequisite: GCOM 217 and 313 or consent of instructor. 2 hrs. lect; 2 hrs. lab.

418 Graphic Presentations. (3) This course will focus on the utilization of multimedia programs using both authoring and presentation technologies. Students will create and present subject matter related to business and technology fields of study utilizing conventional and electronic delivery systems. Prerequisite: 6 s.h. of approved GCOM courses or consent of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

419 On-Line Publishing (3) The focus of this course is on website development. Topics will focus on HTML as well as a variety of WYSIWYG editors and hardware. Site planning and adding graphics and other media (video, animations, etc.) will also be discussed. Prerequisite: GCOM 418. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

492 Independent Study. (13, repeatable to 6) Selection, exploration, and solution of a problem in an area of graphic communication. Prerequisite: Senior college standing, 21 s.h. of GCOM coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (312 in 3-hour blocks, repeatable to 12) Off-campus work experience in graphic communication. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; prerequisites as related to the student's technology option selected; ENG 280. A minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA of 2.00 from courses completed within the major, and approval of program coordinator. Graded S/U only.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (CSTM)

232 Construction Systems. (3) Introduction to construction systems including the interrelationships between the elements of construction, basic graphical construction, and related fields. 3 hrs. lect.

236 Surveying for Construction. (3) An introduction to surveying methods used in the construction industry. Students will learn surveying techniques for roads and building sites. Conventional as well as electronic surveying equipment will be used. Prerequisite: MATH 123. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

301 Residential Architectural Design. (3) Elements of architectural design, materials, site selection, floor plans, elevation views, construction, and the planning of small structures. Traditional as well as computer techniques will be utilized. Prerequisite: MET 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

302 Commercial Architectural Design. (3) An advanced study of plans, details, sections, landscaping, surveying, concrete, steel, and specifications relating to the commercial construction industry. Laboratory experiences include: sketching, drawing, and plan analysis. Prerequisite: CSTM 301. 2 hr. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

334 Construction Concepts. (3) An introductory study of concepts related to construction. Content includes foundations, wood framing, and light gauge and medium gauge steel framing. Prerequisite: CSTM 232. 3 hrs. lect.

336 Aggregate Based Materials. (3) A study of residential and commercial uses of aggregate materials as structural systems with a focus upon aggregate, Portland cement concrete, and asphalt cement concrete. Laboratory experiences include application techniques. Prerequisite: CSTM 334. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

337 Electrical and Mechanical Systems. (3) A study of electrical and mechanical systems. Content includes electrical, plumbing, and HVAC system design, selection, and utilization for energy conservation. Laboratory experiences include techniques of application and installation. Prerequisite: CSTM 334. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

430 Construction Estimating. (3) A study of construction industry estimating techniques and practices for both residential and commercial construction. Students will practice estimating with both simulation exercises and actual construction projects. Computer software will be utilized in this course. Prerequisite: CSTM 301. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

432 Construction Management. (3) A study of construction management principles and techniques. Laboratory experience will include utilizing computer software construction management packages that aid in project tracking. Prerequisite: CSTM 334 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

433 Legal Aspects of Construction. (3) A comprehensive review of legal aspects of construction for managers. Topics include contracts/agreements, liens, bonds, insurance, codes, certification, laws, and ethics. Prerequisite: CSTM 334 or permission of instructor.

448 Construction Occupational Safety and Health. (3) A study of the Federal OSHA Act as it applies to the construction industry. Beyond federal regulations, the course includes accident prevention plans, safety education, and documentation preparation. 3 hrs. lect.

492 Independent Study. (13, repeatable to 6) Selection, exploration, and solution of a problem in an area of graphic communication. Prerequisite: Senior college standing, 21 s.h. of CSTM coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (312 in 3-hour blocks, repeatable to 12) Off-campus work experience in construction. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; prerequisites as related to the student's technology option selected; ENG 280. A minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA of 2.00 from courses completed within the major, and approval of program coordinator. Graded S/U only.

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