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Art

Chairperson: Mr. Charles A. Wright
Office: Garwood Hall 32A
Telephone: (309) 298-1549; Fax: (309) 298-2605
E-mail: Art@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/art

Faculty: Clough, Czechowski, Eberhardt, Holz, Howard, Knavel, Ku, Lindquist, Mahoney, McArthur, Morgan, Myers, Oursler, Rathje, Spangler, Waldrop, Walters, Wright.

The Department of Art offers two baccalaureate degrees: 1) Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with studio tracks in painting, drawing, printmaking, graphic design, sculpture, and ceramics; 2) Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a general studio art option and a Teacher Education option. In addition, the department offers minors in Art History, and Studio Art. The department is accredited by the Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is a comprehensive professional undergraduate degree that stresses high standards of performance. The B.F.A. provides students with opportunities to develop technical competence in a chosen studio track and to broaden their knowledge of Art in areas such as ceramics, graphic design, metalsmithing and jewelry design, painting, printmaking, or sculpture. The concentrated curricular structure of the B.F.A. allows students to integrate knowledge and skill as it prepares them for the intellectual and cultural world of art/design or for graduate study.

The Bachelor of Arts in Art (Studio) is a broad based, well-rounded liberal arts degree. General studio tracks allow students to tailor the program to their particular needs in media such as ceramics, graphic design, metalsmithing and jewelry design, painting, printmaking, or sculpture. The Graphic Design option of the B.A. degree program provides opportunities for students to develop the creative problem-solving and visual criticism skills that are needed in today’s design environment. Students completing the Graphic Design option will find jobs in computer-aided design, desktop publishing, promotional print publications, identity programs, packaging, and signage/information systems. Students electing to enroll in the Teacher Education option of the B.A. degree program will combine general studio coursework with coursework from the College of Education and Human Services and courses in Art Education methods, theory, and research. Students in the Teacher Education option will develop a range of pedagogical and artistic skills and competencies to qualify them for employment in elementary school, middle school (junior high), and secondary school programs.

GradTrac is available to B.A. in Art and B.A. in Art—Graphic Design majors. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College page of the catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/Honors.

Academic Advising

Students enrolling in programs offered by the College of Fine Arts and Communication must consult with the designated departmental advisor.

Transfers

Of the total Art credits required for the Art major, at least half must be earned in WIU Art courses.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Fine Arts—Art

Admission: Art majors may request permission to enter the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program after taking four of the studio components in the Art core (ARTS 101, 102, 140, 240). This request would usually be made after the end of the freshman year following the completion of 30 s.h. of earned credit. Students who have earned a grade point average of at least 2.50 in these four courses will be admitted into the program pending an entry review.

All students seeking the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art must complete I, II, and III.A or III.B below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum Requirements: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 24 s.h.
    ARTS 101, 102, 140, 240, 241; ARTH 282*, 283*, 394†
  3. Options of Study (select A or B)
    1. Art
      1. Special Courses (ARTS 210, 310, 410 or 416, 495): 4 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives
        1. Primary Studio Area: 21 s.h.
        2. Secondary Studio Area: 15 s.h.
        3. Departmental Studio Electives: Studio 2-D and 3-D1: 12 s.h.
        4. Art History Electives: 6 s.h.
    2. Graphic Design
      1. Special Courses: ARTS 210, 310, 416, 495: 4 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives
        1. Primary Studio Area: ARTS 215, 246, 314, 315, 316, 415: 21 s.h.
        2. Secondary Studio Area: 15 s.h.
        3. Departmental Studio Electives: Studio 2-D and 3-D1: 12 s.h.
        4. Art History Electives: 6 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

*May count toward the University General Education requirement

†ARTH 394 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

1At least 6 s.h. must be taken in Studio 3-D.

Bachelor of Arts—Art

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Art must complete I, II, and III.A, III.B, or III.C below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

In accordance with the Illinois State Board of Education licensure rules, all candidates seeking teacher licensure are required by Western Illinois University to obtain a grade of “C” or better in all directed General Education courses, all core courses, and all courses in the option. Note C- is below a C.

  1. University General Education Curriculum Requirements: 43 s.h.
    Option C, Teacher Education, should include a General Education mathematics course
  2. Core Courses: 21 s.h.
    ARTS 101, 102, 140, 240; ARTH 282*, 283*, 394†
  3. Options of Study (select A, B, or C)
    1. Art
      1. Special Course: ARTS 495: 3 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives: 24 s.h.
        1. Art History Elective: 3 s.h.
        2. Departmental Studio Electives: Studio 2-D and 3-D1: 21 s.h.
      3. Minor in another discipline: 16 s.h.
      4. Open Electives: 19 s.h.
    2. Graphic Design
      1. Special Courses: ARTS 215, 246, 314, 315, 316, 415, 416, 495: 22 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives: 9 s.h.
        1. Art History Elective: 3 s.h.
        2. Departmental Studio Electives: Studio 3-D: 6 s.h.
      3. Minor in another discipline: 16 s.h.
      4. Open Electives: 15 s.h.
    3. Art—Teacher Education
      1. Special Courses: ARTE 360, 361, 411, 437; ARTH 284; ARTS 246 or IDT 240: 18 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives: 18 s.h.
        1. Art History Elective: 3 s.h.
        2. Departmental Studio Electives:
          1. Three courses from one primary studio area: 9 s.h.
          2. Two courses from one secondary studio area: 6 s.h.
      3. Other
        EDUC 439: 3 s.h.
        EIS 202, 301, 303, 305, 401: 12 s.h.
        ENG 366 or RDG 387: 2 s.h.
        SPED 210, 390: 4 s.h.
        STCH 480, 482: 12 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

*May count toward the University General Education requirement.

†ARTH 394 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

1At least 6 s.h. must be taken in Studio 3-D.

Minors

Minor in Art History: 18 s.h.
  1. ARTH 282, 283, 394: 9 s.h.
  2. Select 300 and 400 level Art History courses: 9 s.h.
Minor in Graphic Design: 21 s.h.
  1. ARTS 101, 140, 215: 9 s.h.
  2. Select four courses from: ARTS 246, 314, 315, 316, 415: 12 s.h.
Minor in Studio Art: 18 s.h.
  1. ARTS 101, 102, 140; ARTH 180: 12 s.h.
  2. Art Electives (Studio only): 6 s.h.

Course Descriptions

FOUNDATION (ARTS)

101 Design I. (3) A foundation in the organization of two-dimensional visual concepts through design experiences with basic elements and principles of visual structure. A variety of materials are used.

102 Design II. (3) Introductory lab course in threedimensional design. Study includes experimentation with plastic relationships existing between design elements, materials, and the expression of ideas in three-dimensional form. Fee.

140 Drawing I. (3) Fundamental concepts of drawing, including study of line, form, space, value, and composition in a variety of media.

240 Drawing II. (3, repeatable to 6) Opportunities given for continued development of a personal direction in a variety of drawing media. Prerequisite: ARTS 140.

PORTFOLIO REVIEW (ARTS)

210 BFA Entry Portfolio Review. (0) An assessment standard required of all students entering the BFA degree program. Prerequisites: ARTS 101, 102, 140, 240, declared BFA Art Major, and minimum 2.50 grade point average in Art. Graded S/U only.

310 (Formerly ARTS 001) BFA Junior Portfolio Review. (0, repeatable) An assessment standard required of all students pursuing the BFA degree. Prerequisites: S grade in ARTS 210 and a minimum 2.50 grade point average in Art. Graded S/U only. Students may re-enroll until “S” grade is attained.

410 BFA Senior Exhibition. (1) Development and exhibition of a quality body of art works representing the student’s achievements in the major and minor studio areas. Prerequisite: S grade in ARTS 310 and minimum 2.50 grade point average in Art.

495 Professional Practices in the Arts. (3) A seminar capstone course devoted to the development of professional practices in preparation for entry into the contemporary art world. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

ART EDUCATION (ARTE)

360 Methods in Elementary Art. (3) Experiments with art materials to gain insight into the values, curricula, and processes of art activities in the age levels from pre-school into the junior high.

361 Introduction to Art Education. (3) An early orientation to the philosophies and theories of the profession of art education, museum/gallery experience, adult education, etc. Prerequisite: ARTS 101.

411 Arts and Institutions. (3) This course provides students with the opportunity to study the roles of visual arts and arts educational programs in various types of institutions, organizations, and agencies and to explore professional and vocational opportunities within the art world. Prerequisite: ARTE 361 or permission of instructor.

437 Media, Methods, and Materials in Art Education. (3) An overview of media, processes, materials, techniques, and methods appropriate for elementary and secondary school classrooms. Content integrates studio courses with art historical and multicultural uses of traditional/non-traditional media, methods, and materials for producing works of visual art. Prerequisite: ARTE 360.

(Art Education—STCH)

480 Student Teaching—Secondary. (1–16) Student teaching in grades 7–12.

482 Student Teaching. (8) (Grades K–6).

(Art Education—EDUC)

439 High School Art Methods. (3) Students are involved in selecting those learning objectives and situations which emanate from a meaningful art curriculum for the secondary school student. Prerequisites: ARTS 101, 102; ARTE 361 or 360/460.

ART HISTORY (ARTH)

180 An Introduction to Art. (3) (General Education/ Fine Arts) Designed to help students understand our cultural background and the role art plays in contemporary life. The functions, styles, structure of art, and the interaction of medium and meaning. Contact with art forms, visual aids, and readings are utilized to stimulate student responses to aesthetic qualities in the visual arts. Does not count for Art majors. IAI: F2 900.

282 History of Art: Ancient through Medieval. (3) (General Education/Fine Arts) A survey of art in the Western world from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. IAI: F2 901.

283 History of Art: Renaissance to 1900. (3) (General Education/Fine Arts) A survey of art in the Western world from the Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth century. IAI: F2 902.

284 History of Non-Western Art. (3) (General Education/Fine Arts or Multicultural Studies) A survey of art and visual culture in the non-Western world.

388 History of Photography. (3) The study of photography from a historical point of view as well as the study of photographic styles and the works of photography artists.

389 Islamic Art and Architecture. (3) This course studies art and architecture from Islamic cultures from the 7th–13th centuries. It examines key monuments that continue to shape Islamic identity and influence social, political, cultural, and historical landscapes. Prerequisites: any 100- or 200-level Art History (ARTH) course, or permission of instructor.

392 Medieval Art. (3) Study of pivotal works of art and architecture created in medieval Europe (c. 800–1500). These works will be evaluated for their formal and stylistic characteristics, and interpreted with respect to their contemporary cultural, social, political, religious, and economic environments. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; any 200-level ARTH, ARTE, or ARTS course.

394 History of Twentieth Century Art. (3) A survey of Western painting and sculpture from c. 1850 to c. 1945. All major stylistic movements will be examined. Emphasis will be placed upon interpretive issues; works will be examined not only in respect to their formal characteristics, but also as expressions of concurrent art theories, and social, political, scientific, and philosophical developments. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280.

395 American Art. (3) A survey of American art from colonial times to the beginning of the 20th century.

397 African Americans in Art. (3) The study of African Americans in art and visual culture from 1619 to the present. This course examines images of African Americans within a social, historical context as a way to understand evolving American perceptions about race, class, and gender. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

483 History of Architecture. (3, repeatable to 9 for different topics) Designed to give students an opportunity for specialized study in specific areas of the history of art. May deal with a significant artist and his/her times, with a significant movement, or with significant developments in the history of art. Material covered may not be the same each time the course is offered. Instructors are assigned on the basis of their specialized knowledge. Students interested in enrolling can obtain specific information regarding content for a forthcoming semester from the instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; upper division standing; permission of the instructor.

485 Research in Art History. (3, repeatable to 9) An intensive study of a special area of art history selected with the instructor at registration. Prerequisites: 6 to 9 s.h. of Art History courses; ENG 180 and 280; and permission of the instructor.

489 Early Christian, Byzantine, or Medieval Art. (3, repeatable to 9) Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; upper division standing; and permission of the instructor.

491 Renaissance Art in Southern Europe. (3, repeatable to 9) Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; upper division standing; and permission of the instructor.

493 Nineteenth Century Art. (3, repeatable to 9 for different topics) Designed to give students an opportunity for specialized study in specific areas of the history of art. May deal with a significant artist and his/her times, with a significant movement, or with significant developments in the history of art. Material covered may not be the same each time the course is offered. Instructors are assigned on the basis of their specialized knowledge. Students interested in enrolling can obtain specific information regarding content for a forthcoming semester from the instructor. Prerequisites: upper division standing and permission of the instructor.

496 History of Contemporary Art. (3) (Global Issues) A survey of post-WWII developments in the visual arts. The primary focus is upon Western art, but attention is also paid to stylistic developments in Asian, African, and Latin American countries. The central interpretive ideas and concerns for the course will be drawn from contemporary art theory and criticism. Prerequisites: ARTH 394 or permission of instructor; ENG 180 and 280.

GRAPHIC DESIGN (ARTS)

215 Introduction to Graphic Design and Typography. (3) Introduction to the visual communication of graphic design. Typography and symbolic graphics stressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 101, 102, 140, 240, or permission of the instructor.

314 Artistic Digital Imaging. (3) The course emphasizes utilizing the principles of design to effectively communicate ideas visually. Imaging editing software will be used for creative problem-solving projects. Prerequisite: ARTS 215. Fee.

315 Layout and Design. (3) The course focuses on incorporating type and digital imagery in page layouts. Projects emphasize creativity and the principles of visual composition, as well as encouraging awareness of contemporary design trends and their historical precedents. Prerequisite: ARTS 215.

316 Artistic Website Design. (3, repeatable to 6) This course centers on the aesthetic development of well-designed websites and mobile device interfaces. Students will use advanced graphics software to design the layout of individual webpages and the overall site development. Prerequisite: ARTS 315. Fee.

317 Artistic Digital Illustration. (3) This course focuses on digital painting and drawing with a digitizing tablet and stylus in combination with digital imaging software. Assignments will range from developing conceptual drawing skills to creating finished illustrations. Prerequisite: ARTS 215.

318 Motion Graphics and Animation. (3) Artistic analysis of 2D animation techniques and building animations using traditional methods and contemporary compositing techniques to produce hand drawn, typographic, and stop motion animations. Prerequisite: ARTS 215.

414 Internship. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Supervised work experience in graphic design with an approved employer. Written weekly reports required. Must be completed before entering last term on campus. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; ARTS 314, 315, 316, 415; a minimum 2.00 GPA overall; a minimum 2.50 GPA in Art courses within the major; and departmental approval. Graded S/U only.

415 Advanced Graphic Design Concepts. (3, repeatable to 6) Concept and design skills are applied to the development of various projects. Emphasis is on critical thinking, concept development as a process, and research. Focus is on the refinement of the design process and further development of typographic skills. Prerequisite: ARTS 316.

416 Graphic Design Senior Portfolio. (1) Development and creation of a portfolio of art works representing the student’s achievements in the major and minor studio areas. Prerequisites: S grade in ARTS 310 and a minimum 2.50 grade point average in Art or permission of instructor.

STUDIO ART (ARTS)

400 Studio Problems. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual study of design experimentation bridging several art areas, including gallery/museum experience. Not open to freshmen or sophomores. Prerequisites: basic courses in areas of concern; written permission of instructor.

(Ceramics—3D Area)

330 Ceramics I. (3) Introduction to clay as a medium for art expression. Instruction given in fundamentals of aesthetic form, techniques of hand forming, glaze design, and kiln firing. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

331 Ceramics II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Pottery as aesthetic expression in clay. Emphasis is placed upon use of the potter’s wheel with related hand-building techniques as well as glaze design and kiln firing practices. Prerequisite: ARTS 330. Fee.

430 Studio Problems in Ceramics. (3, repeatable to 9) Experimental studio projects reflecting a high level of technical, intuitive, and conceptual approaches. Prerequisite: ARTS 331, permission of instructor. Fee.

(Digital Photography—2D Area)

246 Digital Art Photography I. (3) An introduction to digital photography as an artistic process. Topics include camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation, creative expression, and output of digital images. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print well-conceived artistic compositions.

346 Digital Art Photography II. (3) Students will extend and refine digital skills obtained in Digital Art Photography I, learn how to streamline and personalize image workflow, compare image management options, and explore advanced image editing techniques to fine-tune a portfolio of compelling photographs. Prerequisite: ARTS 246.

(Drawing—2D Area)

140 Drawing I. (3) See Foundation courses listed above.

240 Drawing II. (3, repeatable to 6) See Foundation courses listed above.

241 Life Drawing I. (3) Studio work in drawing the human figure with activities involving techniques, anatomy, and design in varied media. Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and 140. Fee.

340 Intermediate Drawing. (3) In a studio environment, students will employ and build upon previously acquired drawing abilities and participate in group and individual critiques. Investigation of technique and the development of skills will be emphasized. Personal concept and process will be stressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 240.

341 Advanced Life Drawing. (3, repeatable to 9) Further study rendering the human figure with attention given to color and composition. Prerequisite: ARTS 241. Fee.

440 Studio Problems in Drawing. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual problems in drawing selected with the instructor at registration. Prerequisite: ARTS 240 or permission of instructor.

(Jewelry Design-Metals—3D Area)

335 Art Metal and Jewelry I. (3) Studio experiences involving design and fabrication of 3-D forms in fine metals for jewelry and small sculpture. Students will be introduced to basic metal working techniques as applied to non-ferrous metals including sawing, riveting, shaping, and soldering. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

336 Art Metal and Jewelry II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Opportunities given for continued development of a personal direction in metal and jewelry processes. Prerequisite: ARTS 335. Fee.

435 Studio Problems in Art Metal and Jewelry. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual problems in art metal and jewelry selected with the instructor. Prerequisites: ARTS 336, permission of instructor. Fee.

(Non-Traditional Art—2D Area)

453 Non-Traditional Art. (3) Individual study and experimentation in new art materials and concepts in the visual arts. Assignments will be conceptual art, earth art, kinetic art, and newly emerging approaches to art. Prerequisite: study in three studio areas at 300 level or above.

(Painting-Oil—2D Area)

350 Painting I. (3) This studio course explores fundamentals of painting. Assignments given with an emphasis on an understanding of materials including paint, brushes, solvents, mediums, and support structures and their construction and preparation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

451 Painting II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) This course builds upon the skills learned in Painting I with continuing emphasis on materials, techniques, and formal problems. Assignments may expand beyond representational/objective painting and lead into more problem solving/critical thinking. Prerequisite: ARTS 350.

452 Studio Problems in Painting. (3, repeatable to 9) Assignments will be given individually based on previous efforts and will be directed toward the expansion of an idea and the content/subject matter. The course continues to investigate materials and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 451 or permission of instructor.

(Painting-Watercolor—2D Area)

370 Watercolor I. (3) Techniques of transparent and opaque water soluble paints are explored. Prerequisites: ARTS 101, 140. Fee.

371 Watercolor II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Opportunities given for continued development of a personal direction in water soluble media. Prerequisite: ARTS 370. Fee.

470 Studio Problems in Watercolor. (3, repeatable to 9) Selective experimentation with transparent and opaque water media. Prerequisite: ARTS 371 or permission of instructor.

(Printmaking-Intaglio—2D Area)

355 Intaglio I. (3) Studio work in the intaglio processes: engraving, drypoint, and etching on copper and zinc plates. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

356 Intaglio II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Opportunities given for continued development of a personal direction in intaglio processes. Prerequisite: ARTS 355. Fee.

455 Studio Problems in Intaglio. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual problems in a specific print-making medium selected with the instructor at registration. Prerequisites: ARTS 356 and permission of instructor. Fee.

(Printmaking-Lithography—2D Area)

365 Lithography I. (3) Introduction to the technical methods and aesthetic approaches to lithography as applied to stone work and plate work. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

366 Lithography II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Introduction to color printing and related problems. The use of transfer paper and the study of image reversal are other subjects covered. Prerequisite: ARTS 365. Fee.

465 Studio Problems in Lithography. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual projects selected by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisites: ARTS 366, permission of instructor. Fee.

(Printmaking-Silkscreen—2D Area)

368 Silkscreen I. (3) Introduction to silkscreen as a fine art print medium including basic photo-emulsion, drawing fluid and block-out techniques, computergenerated and hand-drawn processes. Students use non-toxic acrylic inks to produce a portfolio of editioned prints. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

369 Silkscreen II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Intermediate level silkscreen; students explore their own artistic voice through resolution of concept and imagery using hand-drawings and advanced digitigraphic processes. Students use non-toxic acrylic inks to produce a portfolio of editioned prints. Prerequisite: ARTS 368. Fee.

468 Studio Problems in Silkscreen. (3, repeatable to 9) Designed for intensive study in silkscreen. Emphasis is on individual research, self-guidance, thematic development, and personal aesthetic expression. Students use non-toxic acrylic inks to produce a portfolio of editioned prints. Prerequisites: ARTS 369, permission of instructor. Fee.

(Sculpture—3D Area)

320 Sculpture I. (3) Studio work in various sculptural processes. Large scale projects may include ceramic sculpture, bronze casting, wood carving, and other media. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Fee.

321 Sculpture II & III. (3, repeatable to 6) Opportunities given for continued development of a personal direction in sculptural processes. Prerequisite: ARTS 320. Fee.

421 Studio Problems in Sculpture. (3, repeatable to 9) Individual problems in sculpture selected with the instructor at registration. Prerequisites: ARTS 321, permission of instructor. Fee.