2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog

Political Science

Chairperson: Dr. Keith Boeckelman
Office: Morgan Hall 422
Telephone: (309) 298-1055; Fax: (309) 298-1739
E-mail: p-science@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/politicalscience

Faculty: Albarracin, Auger, Baldi, Boeckelman, Day, Deitz, Hardy, LaFrance, Lee, Ogbaharya, Placide, Rice, Taylor.

Political Science is both an ancient discipline and one of the most recent social sciences. Political scientists study political institutions, the political behavior of individuals and groups, the formulation and execution of public policy, the relations among states, and also enduring moral issues, such as what is justice and how leaders should be chosen.

The Political Science major prepares the student for a wide range of careers, including: administration of national, state, and local government agencies; preparation for admission to law school; urban and regional planning; political journalism, the conduct and analysis of foreign policy; and preparation for graduate study in Political Science. The departmental advisor has career guides for students interested in law school, graduate study in Political Science, graduate study in public policy, public administration, foreign affairs, and politics.

GradTrac is available to Political Science majors - General, American Government, International Relations/Comparative Politics, Pre-Law, and Public Administration/Public Policy. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum - Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College page of the catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/Honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Arts - Political Science

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Political Science must complete I, II, and III.A, III.B, III.C, III.D, or III.E, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h. A maximum of 6 s.h. of POLS 402 may be counted towards the Political Science major.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements: 60 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 18 s.h.
    POLS 122*, 228*, 267*, 284, 300 or 302, 492†
  3. Options of Study (Select A, B, C, D, or E)
    1. Political Science - General
      1. Directed Electives
        1. At least one course from POLS 381, 382, 383, 389: 3 s.h. If more than one course is taken, it counts as a Department Elective.
        2. At least one course chosen from POLS 317, 318, 319: 3 s.h. If more than one course is taken, it counts as a Department Elective.
      2. Department Electives: 12 s.h.
      3. Any Minor: minimum 16 s.h.
      4. Open Electives: 14 s.h.
    2. American Government
      1. Directed Electives
        1. At least one course chosen from POLS 381, 382, 383, 389: 3 s.h. If more than one course is taken, it counts as a Department Elective.
        2. At least two courses chosen from POLS 317, 318, 319 : 6 s.h. If more than two courses are taken, they count as Open Electives.
        3. Three courses chosen from POLS 223, 308, 311, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 328, 335, 350, 352, 370, 395, 402, 410, 411, 448, 454, 456: 9 s.h.
      2. Any Minor: minimum 16 s.h.
      3. Open Electives: 14 s.h.
    3. International Relations/Comparative Politics
      1. Directed Electives
        1. At least one course chosen from POLS 381, 382, 383, 389: 3 s.h. If more than one course is taken, it counts as an Open Elective.
        2. Students must take at least one course from the International Relations courses listed below and at least one course from the Comparative Politics courses listed below. Students should then select 3 additional courses from the lists below: 15 s.h.
          International Relations: POLS 331, 332, 334, 338, 340, 353, 440, 446
          Comparative Politics: POLS 320, 322, 327, 329, 400, 424, 465
      2. Any Minor: minimum 16 s.h.
      3. Open Electives: 14 s.h.
    4. Pre-Law
      1. Directed Electives
        1. At least one course chosen from POLS 381, 382, 383, 389: 3 s.h. If more than one course is taken, it counts as an Open Elective.
        2. At least four courses chosen from: POLS 226, 319, 410, 411, 448 : 12 s.h.
        3. At least one course chosen from: POLS 223, 315, 317 : 3 s.h.
      2. Any Minor: minimum 16 s.h.
      3. Open Electives: 14 s.h.
    5. Public Administration/Public Policy
      1. Directed Electives
        1. Select POLS 300 or 302 (whichever was not taken as a Core course): 3 s.h.
        2. At least one course chosen from POLS 381, 382, 383, 389: 3 s.h.
          If more than one course is taken, it counts as a Department Elective.
        3. Three courses chosen from POLS 223, 393, 400, 402, 410, 490, 493, 494: 9 s.h.
      2. Department Electives: 3 s.h.
      3. Any Minor: minimum 16 s.h.
      4. Open Electives: 14 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a General Education global issues course or 2) a Political Science (POLS) global issues course.

*Two of POLS 122, 228, 267 may count toward the University General Education Curriculum Requirement.
†POLS 492 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Political Science (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science): 18 s.h.

  1. Core: 9 s.h.
    POLS 122
    One course chosen among POLS 381, 382, 383, 388, 389
    One course chosen among POLS 228, 267, 284, 300
  2. Political Science Electives: 9 s.h.
    At least 6 s.h. of POLS electives must be chosen from courses numbered 300 or above.

Minor in Public Administration (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science): 18 s.h.

  1. POLS 122, 300: 6 s.h.
  2. Political Science Electives selected among the following courses: : 12 s.h.
    POLS 302, 393, 402 (maximum of 3 s.h.), 490, 493, 494
    One course may be selected from the following: POLS 223, 370, 401 (maximum of 3 s.h.)

Minor in International Relations (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science): 18 s.h.

  1. POLS 101 OR 122, AND 228: 6 s.h.
  2. Political Science Electives: 12 s.h.
    Select at least two courses from the following: POLS 331, 332, 338, 340, 353, 440, 446, 451
    In addition, two courses may be chosen from POLS 267, 322, 327, 329

Course Descriptions

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)

(American Government and Politics)

122 American Government and Politics. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) Development, organization, powers, limitation, and practical problems of the governmental and political system of the United States. IAI: S5 900.

223 State Government and Politics. (3) The role of state and local governments within the American federal system. IAI: S5 902.

311 (Cross-listed with AAS 311) Race and Ethnicity in American Politics. (3) This course examines how racial and ethnic minority groups shape, and are shaped by, American politics and society. It focuses primarily on the politics of specific racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. Not open to students with credit in AAS 311. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

315 Illinois Government and Politics. (3) A comprehensive study of Illinois government. Special attention to constitutional developments and the organization and functioning of the government. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or 223, or permission of instructor.

316 Executive-Legislative Relations. (3) An examination of the relationship between the executive branch and Congress including topics such as vetoes, divided government, and the role of the bureaucracy in the lawmaking process. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

317 The Congress. (3) The role of the national legislature in its relationship to the structure of American government and the legislative process. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

318 The Presidency. (3) Analysis of the powers of the President and the relationship of the office to the legislative and judicial branches. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

319 The Judiciary. (3) Functions and role of the federal court system and the judicial process. Emphasis on decision-making, judges, the legal profession, and administration of the courts. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

328 Politics and the Media. (3) This course will explore the power and limits of the media in American politics as well as the ways in which the media defines the “news.” Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

350 Political Campaigns and Elections. (3) Development of a practical understanding and skill in politics and campaigns through classroom instruction and participation in campaigning. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

352 Voting Behavior and Public Opinion. (3) Examines theories and current controversies of American electoral politics, explores the nature and content of public opinion, and analyzes their influence on elected officials. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122 or permission of instructor.

370 Urban Government and Politics. (3) Organization and functions of the government of cities: urban politics, problems, and policies. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or 300 or permission of instructor.

395 Politics and Religion in America. (3) The impact of religion in contemporary American political life, focusing on constitutional issues, electoral politics, and more generally, the interaction between politics and religion. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122 or permission of instructor.

410 Constitutional Law: Government Organization and Powers. (3) An examination of constitutional law in the United States with special emphasis on cases dealing with the framework, powers, and functions of the federal system. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

411 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights. (3) An examination of U.S. Constitutional law, with special emphasis upon civil liberties and civil rights cases. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

448 The Supreme Court. (3) An examination of the role of the Supreme Court in the federal judiciary and in the U.S. political system. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

454 Interest Group Politics. (3) The study of interest group politics in the United States including theories of group development and maintenance, their roles in American politics, their methods of influence, and their effect on government behavior. Prerequisites: POLS 122 and at least junior status or permission of instructor.

456 Political Parties. (3) A study of political parties in the United States including theories of the two-party system, the changing nature and function of modern parties, the roles of third parties, and the effect of parties on the political system. Prerequisite: POLS 122 and at least junior status or permission of instructor.

(Comparative Government and Politics)

267 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) (Global Issues) An introduction to important analytical concepts in comparative politics, the major types of political systems, and major components of the political process. IAI: S5 905.

322 Political Systems of Europe. (3) (Global Issues) Contemporary politics in old and new European democracies. How national policies and national identities converge or conflict in an increasingly integrated Europe. Prerequisite: POLS 267 or permission of instructor.

327 (Cross-listed with AAS 327) Political Systems of Africa. (3) This course examines the nature of institutions and political rule in Africa before and after independence. Key topics include the colonial inheritance, ethnicity and social characteristics of African societies, and the nature and role of political institutions. Not open to student with credit in AAS 327. Prerequisite: POLS 267 or permission of instructor.

329 Political Systems of Latin America. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues)An examination of the political institutions and political processes of selected Latin American states including Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Prerequisite: POLS 267 or permission of instructor.

400 Comparative Public Policy. (3) (Global Issues)The course will examine the public policy process and public policy outcomes using a comparative perspective. It will analyze different policy areas in diverse contexts—e.g., industrial and developing countries—and in selected cases in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Prerequisite: POLS 300 or 302 or permission of instructor.

424 Politics, Poverty, and Society in the Developing World. (3) This course introduces students to the main challenges facing developing countries, including but not limited to democratic change, the struggle against poverty, ethnic conflicts, rural and urban change, and the role of women. Prerequisite: POLS 267 or permission of instructor.

(International Relations)

228 Fundamentals of International Relations. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) (Global Issues) An introduction to both the major concepts and approaches in the study of international relations, and to the contemporary international system, its components, and its problems. IAI: S5 904.

331 United States Foreign Policy. (3) (Global Issues) The role of the United States in the family of nations. The apparatus, materials, and methods of foreign policy. The significance of foreign policy as part of the political system of the United States. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or 228, or permission of instructor.

332 United States Defense Policy and National Security. (3) The organization and role of the National Security Council, Defense Department, military establishment, and CIA. Topics include military technology, warfare, deterrence, arms control, and the defense budget. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or 228, or permission of instructor.

334 Politics of the Global Economy. (3) (Global Issues) Political analysis of theories and operation of the modern international economy, including international institutions and transnational corporations, the globalization of finance and production, and issues of dominance and dependence. Prerequisite: POLS 228 or permission of instructor.

338 The United Nations and International Organization. (3) (Global Issues) A study of world and regional organization as reflections of world politics, as instruments of foreign policies, and as forces for change and order. Prerequisite: POLS 228 or permission of instructor.

340 US-China Relations. (3) Study of contemporary relations between the United States and China, examining shifting patterns of cooperation and competition on a wide range of issues. Prerequisite: POLS 228 or permission of instructor.

440 International Security and Arms Control. (3) (Global Issues) Systematic analysis of the disarmament efforts of nations; role of international organizations; problems of national security and inspection; economic and political implications. Prerequisite: POLS 228 or permission of instructor.

446 Conflict Resolution and International Peacekeeping. (3) (Global Issues) Study of the history and practice of international peacekeeping operations. Emphasis on international organizations and the feasibility of conflict resolution and collective security. Prerequisites: POLS 122 and 228.

(Political Theory)

200 Introduction to Political Thought. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) Survey of political theorists from Socrates to present with special emphasis freedom.

381 Classical Political Theory. (3) The development of Western political philosophy from Plato to Machiavelli with particular emphasis on justice and the good society. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122, or permission of instructor.

382 Modern Political Theory. (3) A study of modern and contemporary political theories from Machiavelli to the present with particular emphasis on such concepts as justice, liberty, freedom, and equality. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122, or permission of instructor.

383 American Political Thought. (3) Introduction to political theory in the United States designed to present a balanced picture of the origins and development of American political ideas from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122, or permission of instructor.

389 Politics an382 Modern Political Theory. (3)d Ethics. (3) The course will focus on the ethics of the process of decision making by public officials in a representative democracy. The course also will examine the ethical issues raised by public policies on abortion, affirmative action, and the environment. Prerequisite: POLS 122.

(Public Administration)

300 Introduction to Public Administration. (3) Policy development and the implementation by governmental agencies; the exercise of discretion by administrative bodies, their responsibility to elected public officials, and their responsiveness to societal demands. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122, or permission of instructor.

302 Introduction to Public Policy. (3) A comprehensive study of public policymaking and systematic description, explanation, and evaluation of the processes in which public policies are developed, legitimized, funded, implemented, and evaluated in terms of their social impact. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122 or permission of instructor.

393 Environmental Politics. (3) A study of the political, legal, administrative, and regulatory aspects of controlling pollution, protecting environmental quality, and managing natural resources. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

490 Bureaucracy and Public Policy. (3) The role of the public bureaucracy in the policy-making and policy-formation process. Legislative and judicial policymaking are contrasted with administrative policymaking. Prerequisite: POLS 300 or 302 or permission of instructor.

493 Seminar in Organization Theory and Behavior. (3) Review of classical and modern theories of administration. Goals and expectations of high echelon administrators. Treatment of authority relationships in formal organizations. Prerequisite: POLS 300 or 302 or permission of instructor.

494 Public Budgeting Systems. (3) Financial and budgetary processes and problems of public agencies at various governmental levels. Includes types and functions of budgets. Systematic program evaluation and budgetary allocation questions are emphasized.