2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog

Sociology and Anthropology

Chairperson: Dr. John F. Wozniak
Office: Morgan Hall 404
Telephone: (309) 298-1056; Fax: (309) 298-1857
E-mail: JF-Wozniak@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/sociology

Faculty: Adamski-Mietus, Adkins Covert, Anderson, Bideshi, Chang, Davis, Ebert Wallace, Hironimus-Wendt, Mannion, McGinty, McIlvaine-Newsad, Rohall, Sandage, Schaefer, Tang, Tollini, Warner, Welch, Werner, Wilson, Wozniak.

Sociology is the study of human societies, their structure, and the ways individuals and groups relate to one another. Sociological knowledge is vital to the understanding of contemporary issues and topics such as poverty, race and gender relations, crime, delinquency, deviance, mental illness, urban growth and decay, marriage and family life, behavior in bureaucracies, and the organization and delivery of human services.

Since its curriculum emphasizes everyday issues and the workings of society in general, the B.A. in Sociology is useful in a great variety of occupational fields and positions such as personnel, industry, survey research, public-opinion polling, marketing and advertising research, and in government or nonprofit agencies which provide for the delivery of human services. Many Sociology graduates also work in hospitals or health-care organizations as well as in education and business and undertake graduate studies in Sociology and other fields. Majors in other disciplines will find that Sociology courses provide valuable background for careers in law enforcement, medicine, public health, counseling, personnel management, education, and social work.

The B.A in Anthropology provides students with skills to think holistically about human behavior, diversity, and social problems through the combination of human biology, cultural analysis, linguistics, and study of past societies. Graduates from this Anthropology program will gain a broad understanding of human biological and cultural diversity and acquire skills to successfully navigate the rapidly changing global environment. The curriculum of this program enables an opportunity to apply anthropological research to environmental and community-based practical learning experiences.

The degree in Anthropology prepares students interested in a range of professional fields such as law, social work, international economic development, business, public administration, health care, forensic science, human rights advocacy, and other human service professions. Local schools, the National Park Service, consultants, and museums also offer employment opportunities for these students. The Anthropology program also presents a theoretical and practical foundation for graduate studies in Anthropology and Archaeology.

In addition to the major in Sociology and major in Anthropology, the department offers a minor in Sociology, a minor in Anthropology, and a minor in Functional Morphology and Evolutionary Anatomy. Such minors are useful accompaniments to majors in Health, Social Work, Agriculture, Family and Consumer Sciences, the Social Sciences, and Education.

GradTrac is available to Sociology and Anthropology majors. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College page of the catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/Honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Arts—Sociology

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements: 60 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 21 s.h.
    SOC 100, 232, 332†, 333, 334, 415; ANTH 110
  3. Sociology Electives: 15 s.h.
    May include up to 6 s.h. of Anthropology coursework beyond ANTH 110.
  4. Open Electives: 4–8 s.h.
  5. Any Minor: 16–20 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

†SOC 332 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Arts—Anthropology

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements: 60 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 12 s.h.
    ANTH 110, 111, 419†; EIS 440 or ANTH 380
  3. Anthropology Directed Electives
    1. Complete one of the following: 3 s.h.
      ANTH 201 or 249
    2. Complete one of the following: 3 s.h.
      ANTH 305, 310, 325, or 326
    3. Complete at least 15 s.h. of Anthropology coursework (with at least four upperdivision courses), with the following additional course options:
      EIS 458 and 440: 15 s.h.
  4. Any Minor: 18–24 s.h.
  5. Open Electives: 3–9 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved study abroad program.

†ANTH 419 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Sociology: 18 s.h.
  1. SOC 100: 3 s.h.
  2. Sociology Electives: 15 s.h.
Minor in Anthropology: 18 s.h.
  1. ANTH 110, 111: 6 s.h.
  2. Anthropology Electives: 12 s.h.
Minor in Functional Morphology and Evolutionary Anatomy

See Interdisciplinary Studies Minors.

Course Descriptions

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

100 Introduction to Sociology. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) Basic sociological concepts and studies in such areas a culture, social organization, personality, family, and community. IAI: S7 900.

200 Contemporary Social Problems. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) An investigation of problems pertaining to group conflict, race relations, crime, family disorganization, and other significant aspects of contemporary society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor. IAI: S7 901.

232 Social Research Methods I. (3) Introduction to the application of the scientific method and statistics in sociological research. Emphasis on sampling, measures of central tendency, dispersion, association, and introduction to inferential statistics. Prerequisites: SOC 100, and completion of the University General Education Curriculum baccalaureate-level skills in Mathematics requirement.

250 American Institutions. (3) (General Education/ Social Sciences) An overview of the more enduring clusters of roles and values by which family, economic, religious, educational, and political processes are conducted. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

255 Deviant Behavior. (3) An analysis of research findings and theories relating to a variety of forms of “deviant behavior.” Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

272 Individual and Society. (3) (General Education/ Social Sciences) This course explores sociological theories and research on the relationship between the individual and society. Students will learn how individuals participate in the construction of society and how social structure impacts our everyday lives. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

285 (Cross-listed with WS 285) Women: A Global Perspective. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences or Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) This course emphasizes the voices of women across the globe from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special attention will be paid to women’s activism, the transnational feminist movement, and an examination of the category “woman” in the global context. Not open to students with credit in WS 285. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WS 190.

300 Minority Peoples. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) Group relations of ethnic, racial, religious, and sexual minorities. Conflict, separation, assimilation, and related processes. BGS online writing course. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor. IAI: S7 903D.

312 Community. (3) Systems of interrelated organizations, institutions, and persons clustered in the same locations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

313 Self and Identity. (3) The relationships between culture, social structure, socialization, and self and identity are investigated applying perspectives in sociological social psychology. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

316 Collective Behavior and Social Movements. (3) Analysis of group formations, collective activity, and collective action processes including crowds, mass behavior, flash mobs (and other spontaneous events), fads, and social and political movements. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

320 Sociology of Work, Occupations and Professions. (3) Analysis of the relationship between work and social life. Considers occupational structure, worker organization, professional work and socialization, and race, class, and gender issues in the labor market. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

330 Bureaucracy and Formal Organization. (3) Nature, conditions of growth, and consequences of bureaucratic organization in Western society with particular attention to the United States. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

332 Social Research Methods II. (3) Hypothesis construction and testing with emphasis on research design, data gathering techniques, and scale construction. The course includes a major research project with application of sociological statistics. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: SOC 232 or consent of instructor; ENG 280.

333 Classical Sociological Theory. (3) A critical examination and analysis of major classical theories in Sociology and their influences upon the development of contemporary social thought. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

334 Contemporary Sociological Theory. (3) Detailed examination, analysis, and evaluation of selected modern sociological theories. Emphasis on critical analysis and interpretation of schools such as structural functionalism, conflict, neo-Marxian, symbolic interactionist, exchange, network, rational choice, critical race, feminist, and integrative theories. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and 333.

335 Group Dynamics. (3) An introduction to intraand intergroup dynamics in small groups emphasizing perspectives in sociological social psychology. The course focuses on group decision-making, coalitions, conformity, intergroup relations, and status and power in groups. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

345 Rural Social Organizations. (3) An examination of rural society from feudalism to agri-business. Emphasis on changes wrought by demographic, bureaucratic, and technological factors and their consequences for contemporary farming. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

355 Criminology. (3) Theories of crime causation and control are discussed in relation to specific behavior systems in crime. In additions, various problem areas in criminology are discussed. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

360 (Cross-listed with WS 360) Gender and Society. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) This course provides a sociological examination of theories of gender, socio-historical gender patterns, gender and American social institutions, social structure and gender, and cross-cultural comparisons. BGS online writing course. Not open to students with credit in WS 360. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

365 (Formerly SOC 472) Sociology of Health and Illness. (3) Examines the medical institution using sociological theories. Focus on illumination of the social context of health and the medical system using sociological research methods. Topics include the social construction of illness, the provider-client relationship, and medicalization in Western cultures. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and another Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

370 American Family. (3) A survey of major American marriage and family trends with an emphasis upon changes in mate selection, marital roles, marital adjustment, family life, and other related issues. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor. IAI: S7 902.

405 Sociology of Aging in Rural and Urban America. (3) An investigation of the social and political consequences for communities and society at large from the expanding populations of the aged and a sociological examination of the relationships between community and institutional arrangements and the social and social-psychological dimensions of aging. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

410 (Cross-listed with WS 410) Women and Poverty. (3) The poverty of women in the United States including factors of race, place of residence, and age are covered. Structural hierarchies that maintain poverty are examined from a sociological perspective. Not open to students with credit in WS 410. Prerequisite: WS 190 or SOC 100 or permission of instructor.

414 Population. (3) The distribution, growth, and characteristics of human population and their relationship to social organization. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

415 Social Stratification. (3) Distribution of wealth, power, and prestige and related structures and values. Prerequisite: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

420 (Cross-listed with AAS 420 and WS 420) Race, Class, and Gender. (3) The course will examine issues of race, class, and gender in historical, cultural, and contemporary societal contexts. Not open to students with credit in AAS 420 or WS 420. Prerequisite: SOC 100, or AAS 100, or WS 190; or permission of instructor.

424 Sociology of Mental Health. (3) A survey of the history, causes, treatment, and effects of mental illness in the U.S. with emphasis on sociological factors such as social class, race, definitional process, etc. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

425 Juvenile Delinquency. (3) A survey of various theories of juvenile delinquency and an examination of the juvenile justice system and its relationship to rehabilitation prospects. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

426 Industrial Sociology. (3) Impact of industrialization on society; structure and functions of work organization; occupations and careers; managerial and union philosophies; industry-community relations. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

427 Sociology of Sexual Identities and Inequalities. (3) Study of issues related to the sociology of sexual identities and the resulting inequalities. While heterosexuality will be discussed, the focus will be on homosexual and bisexual identities and how they are constructed and experienced in a heteronormative society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

430 (Cross-listed with WS 430) Sociology of Women’s Health. (3) Uses sociological theories and research to examine the gendered experience of illness. Includes sociological analysis of medical knowledge about women’s health. Topics include medicalization of women’s health, the gendered hierarchy of professions, and feminist critiques of scientific research. Not open to students with credit in WS 430. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

432 (Cross-listed with POLS 432) Survey Research. (3) An overview of how to design, conduct, and present the results of social surveys. The course includes a familiarization with data preparation for computer processing and an introduction to using computer software statistical packages. Not open to students with credit in POLS 432. Prerequisite: any University-level Statistics course or consent of instructor.

433 Individual Investigations in Sociology. (1–3, repeatable to 3) Students will pursue a topic of special interest to the individual to be chosen in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisites: 12 s.h. of Sociology coursework, 2.70 GPA, and consent of department chairperson.

435 (Cross-listed with WS 435) Women and Crime. (3) Theories of female criminality, patterns of female crime and victimization, women in corrections, and women as criminal justice practitioners are examined. Not open to students with credit in WS 435. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

440 Global Sociology. (3) This course examines socio-cultural, economic, political, and technological processes of globalization using sociological concepts and theories to provide students with a systematic way of studying our interconnected world. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

445 Sociology of Corporate Crime. (3) A sociological analysis of theories and research concerning the nature, extent, costs, and control of crimes committed by corporations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

451 Special Topics in Sociology. (1–2, repeatable for different topics to 6) In-depth investigations of special topics in broader subfields of Sociology. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

455 Sociology of Corrections. (3) An analysis of correctional institutions, including the inmate structure, custodial and administrative personnel, treatment programs, and the social factors which affect prison structure and function. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

460 The Family. (3) Institutions and systems of kinship, marriage, family grouping, child rearing, personal maintenance, and status placement. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

461 Educational Sociology. (3) A comparative and functional analysis of education as an institution; the interaction of education and other institutions; and the relation of education to social change. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

462 Political Sociology. (3) An analysis of power structures, decision making systems, conflict, conflict resolution, and various theories of power. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

463 Sociology of Law. (3) An analysis of the social origins of law, the effects of law on human behavior and social institutions, and the relationship between law and social change. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

464 (Cross-listed with REL 464) Sociology of Religion. (3) (Global Issues) An analysis of religious groups and institutions, a comparison of religion in sacred and secular societies, and the effect of religion on behavior and social institutions. Not open to students with credit in REL 464. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

465 Deviance, Crime and Control in Socio- Historical Perspective. (3) Historical conceptions of deviance, origins of prisons, asylums; emergence of police; rates and types of deviance and varieties of social control in particular historical periods. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

470 Sociology of Popular Culture. (3) This course exposes students to the sociological study of popular culture. Material products and production methods, ideology and symbolic meanings are investigated in relation to social behavior using relevant theories and methodological tools of analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

471 Urban Sociology. (3) History of urban growth, location, ecology, planning, and land use of cities; social organization and institutions in urban societies compared with rural and other models. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

480 Deviance and Disruption in the American Family. (3) A sociological analysis of family deviance, neglect, abuse, and violence including processes leading to major personal crises and family disruption, and social programs and policies. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

485 Sociology of Victims. (3) An overview of victimology examining: the socio-political structural arrangements that create and sustain victimization, differing types of victimization, and the practical applications of victimological findings. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

487 Application of Fire Research. (3) Involves the understanding of fire research and its application. Data from available research on fire prevention and protection programs are studied. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Open Learning Fire Service program for inservice fire/safety personnel by the director of the School of Distance Learning, International Studies and Outreach.

488 Community and the Fire Threat. (3) Sociological and economic characteristics of communities and their influence on the fire problem. Housing, structure abandonment, rent control, crime, false alarm, and incendiary fire rates are studied. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Open Learning Fire Service program for inservice fire/safety personnel by the director of the School of Distance Learning, International Studies and Outreach.

494 (Cross-listed with ANTH 494) Internship. (3) Supervised applied experience in occupationally related area. Seminars and written reports required. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 494. Prerequisites: approval of department chairperson and junior or senior status.

497 Senior Honors Thesis in Sociology. (3–6, repeatable to 6) Thesis research under the direction of at least two Sociology faculty members on a topic of mutual agreement; 6 s.h. required for honors. Prerequisite: approval of departmental honors advisor.

499 Seminar in Sociology. (3, repeatable for different topics) Topics to be announced. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

110 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences or Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) Survey of basic concepts and approaches of Anthropology to the study of human beings. Study of worldwide cultures from prehistoric to the present. IAI: S1 901N.

111 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences) Study of human evolution from the perspectives of both biological and social sciences. Examination of the evolution of culture and the methods of its interpretation. IAI: S1 902.

201 (Formerly ANTH 301) World Culture Regions. (3, repeatable to 9 for different culture regions) Surveys of the cultural adaptations of different regions of the world. Either the peoples of Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, or the Pacific will be studied each time the course is offered. The region will be announced in the time schedule. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

249 Native North American Cultures. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) Introduction to aboriginal North American cultures with an examination of the rich diversity of cultural development and its relationship to the natural environment. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

305 Applied Anthropological Methods. (3) (Global Issues) Applies anthropological knowledge and methods to regional, national, and global contemporary problems. Includes current theoretical, ethical, and methodological debates. Social issues may include discrimination, hunger, disease, and underdevelopment. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

310 Methods in Physical Anthropology. (3) This course provides an introduction to physical anthropological methods, including assessing human variation, interpreting the human fossil record, and techniques in forensic anthropology. Students gain an understanding of the tools used in the analysis of primate and human skeletal remains. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or ZOOL 200 or permission of instructor.

315 (Cross-listed with WS 315) Gender and Anthropology. (3) Exploration of cross-cultural ethnographies of variations in gender roles in economic, religious, and political domains. This course also addresses gender identity and gender diversity issues. Not open to students with credit in WS 315. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

320 New World Archaeology: North America. (3) Survey of North American archaeology. Special emphasis on pre-Columbian culture adaptations of eastern United States and the Mississippi Valley, particularly the Illinois region. Prerequisite: 6 s.h. of Anthropology coursework including ANTH 111, or consent of instructor.

324 Religion, Magic, and Shamanism. (3) (Global Issues) Survey of cross-cultural perspectives on beliefs and practices dealing with the supernatural, magic, and religion. The functions and social positions of spiritual leaders from different cultures are explored. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

325 Laboratory Analysis of Archaeological Material. (1–3, repeatable to 6 for different projects) Instruction in the study of material remains recovered from archaeological sites. Processing techniques and methods of analysis presented to introduce students to research in prehistory. Only 3 s.h. may count toward major. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

326 Archaeological Field Methods. (1–6, repeatable to 12 for different projects) Intensive field training in the theory, problems, methods, and ethics of archaeological research. Usually taught during summer months at a camp located some distance from campus. Only 6 s.h. may count toward major. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

330 (Cross-listed with WS 330) Sex and Gender in Archaeology. (3) The study of sex, gender, and power in archaeological investigations and theory, including cross-cultural comparison of gender and social differentiation in past societies. Changing perspectives on the roles of females in human evolution and prehistory are emphasized. Not open to students with credit in WS 330. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or 111 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

353 (Cross-listed with PSY 353) Cultural Psychology. (3) (Global Issues) Examines culture as the physical environment, social institutions and practices, language, and the media that influences human behavior and mental processes. Not open to students with credit in PSY 353. Prerequisites: 9 s.h. of Psychology coursework and junior standing or permission of instructor.

380 Language and Culture. (3) Study of language as an aspect of culture. Structural and historical analysis of language. Examination of the relationship of language to social structure. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

381 (Formerly ANTH 281) Old World Archaeology. (3) Study of major developments in the prehistory of Africa, Europe, and Asia. Examination of earliest man and his cultures through the rise of complex societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or consent of instructor. Recommended: ANTH 110.

395 (Cross-listed with WS 395) Gender, Race, and the Environment. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) Explores research, scholarship, and fictional ecofeminist works. Students will consider the influence of women, feminists, and ecofeminist writings on local and global environmental movements. Not open to students with credit in WS 395. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or WS 190 or permission of instructor.

404 Dynamics of Cultural Change. (3) Examination of cultural change resulting from social forces, intercultural contact, and changes in the natural environment, focusing on the role of “conflict” and peace-building in the past and present societies, globalization, and modern applications. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

405 Forensic Anthropology. (3) Forensic Anthropology deals with the medicolegal problem of identifying human skeletal remains. This course provides an elementary understanding of human skeletal biology, forensic archaeology, and the recovery and identification procedures involved when unknown skeletal remains are discovered. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or consent of instructor.

410 Anthrozoology. (3) Anthrozoology examines human-animal relationships from the perspective of Anthropology with an emphasis on culture and its influence on attitudes toward animals. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

415 Environmental Anthropology. (3) (Global Issues) Study of environmental issues from the perspectives of different cultures; students will study ecological and cultural adaptations of humans, and explore strategies for solving environmental problems involving cross-cultural stakeholders. Topics may include global climate change, biodiversity, and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or permission of instructor.

417 (Cross-listed with ZOOL 417) Primate Ecology, Behavior and Evolution. (3) This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to primatology utilizing principles from Anthropology, Ecology, Paleontology, and animal behavior. Students gain an understanding of the evolutionary history, adaptations, and conservation of primates and their habitats. Not open to students with credit in ZOOL 417. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or permission of instructor. Junior standing recommended.

419 Anthropological Theory. (3) Study of the intellectual currents which led to the establishment of Anthropology as a discipline. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: 12 s.h. of Anthropology coursework including ANTH 110 and 111.

420 Cultural Feast: The Anthropology of Food. (3) Anthropological study of food symbolism, rules, consumption, health, and the gendered dimensions of food, including gathering, preparation and distribution, and commoditization of food. Issues of scarcity and links to environmental sustainability, global social hierarchies, and power relations are also addressed. Prerequisite: ANTH 110.

425 Culture and Catastrophe: The Anthropology of Disaster. (3) Introduces critical theoretical and methodological approaches in the anthropological study of disasters. Examines human preparedness and response to disaster events, issues of social stratification and inequality, and environmental and social forces that influence vulnerability and social policy from an international perspective. Prerequisite: ANTH 110.

451 Special Topics in Anthropology. (1–2, repeatable for different topics to 6) In-depth investigations of special topics from broader subfields of Anthropology. Prerequisite: 6 s.h. of Anthropology coursework including ANTH 110 or 111 (as most relevant), or consent of instructor.

463 (Cross-listed with BOT 463) Ethnobotany. (4) (Global Issues) A survey of how indigenous people use and classify plants in comparison to modern, scientific principles of botany and plant chemistry, and the use of traditional knowledge by modern science. May require field work travel at student expense. Not open to students with credit in BOT 463. Prerequisites: BIOL 100, 101; BOT 200 (C grade or better); ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); ANTH 110 or SOC 100; or permission of instructor.

489 Seminar in Anthropology. (3, repeatable for different topics) Topics to be announced. Prerequisites: 6 s.h. of Anthropology coursework including ANTH 110 or 111 (as most relevant) or permission of instructor.

490 Individual Investigation in Anthropology. (1–3, repeatable to 3) Students will pursue a topic of special interest to the individual to be chosen in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and department chairperson.

494 (Cross-listed with SOC 494) Internship. (3) Supervised applied experience in occupationally related area. Seminars and written reports required. Not open to students with credit in SOC 494. Prerequisites: approval of department chairperson and junior or senior status.