Undergraduate Catalog

Liberal Arts and Sciences Degree

Director: Dr. Alphonso Simpson, Jr.
Office: Morgan Hall 232
Telephone: (309) 298-2214
E-mail: A-Simpson@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/las

Program Offering and Locations:

  • Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in African American Studies: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in Religious Studies: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in Women’s Studies: Macomb, Quad Cities

Faculty: Baker-Sperry, Boukari, Brooks, Carr, Haynes, Morgan, Perabo, Simpson, Stovall, Watkins.

Academic Advisor, Macomb: Ellen Poulter

Academic Advisor, Quad Cities: Kenneth W. Wheeler II

The Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a multidisciplinary degree that embodies the spirit of a liberal arts education, emphasizing comparative critical thinking, communication, and a broad range of methodologies and applied skills. As is true of many degree programs in the Liberal Arts and Sciences, students pursuing a Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences are not specifically trained for a particular vocation or career path. Instead, graduates of the program bring the integration of multiple disciplinary perspectives, combined with critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills, to a variety of careers that value adaptability, flexibility, and innovation. Rather than training for a specific career, this degree offers a comprehensive and rigorous intellectual foundation for a lifetime of learning, preparing individuals to adapt to many different academic, personal, and professional paths.

In addition to the introductory and capstone courses, the degree consists of four possible emphases. The first emphasis, Multidisciplinary Studies, offers students the opportunity to study across the arts and sciences. The second emphasis, Environmental Studies, allows students to choose from among approved courses with an environmental focus. The third emphasis, Paired Minors, requires students to complete two approved minors as their multidisciplinary major. The fourth emphasis, Peace Corps, allows students to choose from among approved courses with a focus on community development and international service. All emphases offer students the opportunity to complete an internship as part of the major.

GradTrac is available to Liberal Arts and Science majors. See more information about GradTrac.

Integrated Baccalaureate and Master’s Degree Program—An integrated baccalaureate and master’s degree program is available for the Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Master of Liberal Arts and Sciences. An integrated degree program provides the opportunity for outstanding undergraduates to earn both degrees in five years. Please refer to the Graduate Studies catalog for details about the integrated program.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences

All students seeking the Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements: 57 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 6 s.h.
    LAS 195, 495†
  3. Directed Electives: at least 33 s.h.
    (Select one of the following emphases; at least 18 s.h. must be at the 300 or 400 level; no more than two courses can count in both the major and General Education; no more than 6 s.h. of independent study, directed readings, or internship can count toward the major without LAS director approval.)
    1. Multidisciplinary Studies Emphasis: 33-34 s.h.
      (Select at least 33 s.h. from at least three different prefixes with no more than 12 s.h. from any one prefix.)
      1. Select at least 6 s.h. at the 100 or 200 level from any of the following prefixes: AAS, AGE, ANTH, BIOL, BOT, CHEM, CHIN, ECON, ENG, ENVR, F L, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, HIST, JPN, LAS, MATH, MICR, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSY, REL, SOC, SPAN, STAT, WS, ZOOL
      2. Select at least 18 s.h. from a combination of at least two of the following categories:
        1. Humanities
          Select at least 6 s.h. at the 300 or 400 level from any of the following prefixes: ENG, F L, FR, GER, HIST, PHIL, REL, SPAN
        2. Natural Sciences/Mathematics
          Select at least 6 s.h. at the 300 or 400 level from any of the following prefixes: BIOL, BOT, CHEM, ENVR, GEOL, MATH, MICR, PHYS, STAT, ZOOL
        3. Social Sciences
          Select at least 6 s.h. at the 300 or 400 level from any of the following prefixes: AAS, AGE, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, POLS, PSY, SOC, WS
      3. Select one of the following methods courses: AAS 451†; ANTH 305, 310; BIOL 451, 452; BOT 410; ENG 299, 380†, 381†; F L 350; GEOG 301; GEOL 310; POLS 284, 306, 432; PSY 223, 323†; SOC 323†, 324, 432; STAT 376, 476
      4. Select one additional Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course from the following: AAS 451†; ENG 380†, 381†; FR 326†; GER 326†; PHIL 312**†; PSY 323†; REL 312**†; SOC 323†; SPAN 326†; WS 455†
        Or other appropriate WID course in consultation with LAS program director
        ** Requires corequisite
    2. Environmental Studies Emphasis: 33-34 s.h.
      (No more than 12 s.h. under the same prefix can count toward the major.)
      1. ENVR 201, 401
      2. Select at least 6 s.h. from any of the following (these may be prerequisites for upper-division courses): ANTH 110; BOT 200, 210; CHEM 101, 102; ECON 232; GEOG 100, 110, 121, 208, 251; GEOL 110, 112, 113, 115; HIST 105, 106; MATH 123; METR 120; MICR 200; PHYS 114, 115, 124, 125, 150; POLS 122; SOC 100; STAT 171; ZOOL 200
      3. Select at least 18 s.h. from at least three different prefixes, including at least 1 course designated as methods:
        Methods Courses
        ANTH 305; BIOL 451, 452; BOT 410; CHEM 341; ENG 380†, 381†; GEOL 310; SOC 324; STAT 376, 476
        Additional Directed Electives Courses
        AGEC 430; ANTH 395, 410, 415, 417, 420, 425, 463; BIOL 330, 350, 425, 426, 453, 454, 456, 458, 459, 479; BOT 423, 452, 463; CHEM 342; ECON 430, 465; ENG 340; GEOG 408, 426, 430, 445, 448, 457, 459, 466; GEOL 375, 380, 450; HIST 300, 312, 316, 421, 483; METR 327, 337; MICR 423; PHIL 333, 415; POLS 370, 393; RPTA 485; SOC 316, 345, 440, 471; WS 395; ZOOL 408, 409, 415, 416, 417, 452, 485 Other courses may also be appropriate for this category; see LAS director for approval.
      4. Select one additional Writing in the Disciplines (WID) course from: BIOL 340†; BOT 451†; ENG 380†, 381†; HIST 420†; MICR 451†; PHIL 312**†; SOC 323†; ZOOL 451†
        Other courses may also be appropriate for this category; see LAS director for approval.
        ** Requires corequisite
    3. Paired Minors Emphasis: 33-48 s.h.
      (Choose two minors from different categories. No more than two courses or 6 s.h. may be shared across selected minors. One Writing Instruction in the Disciplines [WID] course [in addition to LAS 495] must be taken from either of the departments offering the selected minors, or ENG 380† or ENG 381†.)
      Categories:
      1. Humanities: Creative Writing; English; Film; French; German; History; Modern Global History; Philosophy; Professional Writing; Religious Studies; Spanish
      2. Natural Sciences/Mathematics: Botany; Chemistry; Forensic Chemistry; Forensic Science; Geology; Mathematics; Microbiology; Neuroscience; Physics; Weather and Climate; Zoology
      3. Social Sciences: Anthropology; Economics; Forensic Psychology; Geography; Global Politics; Political Science; Psychology; Public Administration and Public Service; Sociology
      4. Interdisciplinary: African American Studies; Aging Studies; Communication; Environmental Studies; Geographic Information Systems; International Studies; Law and Society; Women’s Studies
    4. Peace Corps Emphasis: 33 s.h.
      (No more than 12 s.h. under the same prefix can count toward the major. This emphasis is for students interested in a focus on community development and international service, with the possibility of joining the Peace Corps after completing the WIU Peace Corps Prep program through the Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs.
      NOTE: Completion of the emphasis alone does not constitute completion of the WIU Peace Corps Prep program. For more information on PC prep, please visit wiu.edu/peace_corps/pc_prep or contact pcprep@wiu.edu).
      1. Select 9 s.h. from any of the following prefixes: AAS, AGE, ANTH, BIOL, BOT, CHEM, CHIN, ECON, ENG, ENVR, F L, FR, GEOG, GEOL, GER, HIST, JPN, LAS, MATH, MICR, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSY, REL, SOC, SPAN, STAT, WS, ZOOL
      2. Select 9 s.h. from one of the Peace Corps sectors listed below (for example, three courses from Community and Economic Development, or three courses from Environment, etc.):
        1. Community and Economic Development
          ECON 100, 232, 330, 332, 350†, 351, 420, 460, 465, 470; POLS 334; SOC 312, 335, 345
        2. Environment
          ANTH 395, 415, 463; BIOL 350, 425, 426, 451, 456, 479; BOT 451, 463; CHEM 342; ENVR 201, 401; GEOG 100, 110, 121, 426, 430, 466; GEOL 113, 375, 380; METR 327, 337; MICR 400, 405, 434, 460, 463; POLS 393; RPTA 485; WS 395; ZOOL 409, 414, 485
        3. Youth in Development
          ANTH 353; PSY 100, 250, 251, 353, 355, 422; REL 101; SOC 312
      3. Select 9 s.h., based on cultural sensitivity and agility, from the following: AAS 100, 102, 283, 349, 420; ANTH 110, 201, 315, 324, 353, 380, 404; ENG 357; ENG 492; F L 101; GEOG 110, 466; HIST 245, 307, 318, 341, 349; LAS 210; POLS 228, 267, 322, 329, 331, 334, 338, 350, 353, 400; PSY 353; REL 111, 303, 464, 492; SOC 285, 300, 360, 410, 420, 430, 440, 464; WS 190, 285, 303, 315, 318, 360, 410, 420, 430
      4. Select one additional Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course from the following: AAS 451†; ENG 380†, 381†; FR 326†; GER 326†; PHIL 312**†; PSY 323†; REL 312**†; SOC 323†; SPAN 326†; WS 455†
        Or other appropriate WID course in consultation with LAS director.
        ** Requires corequisite
      5. Complete LAS 496
  4. Minor: 16–24 s.h.
  5. Open Electives: 0–8 s.h.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

† LAS 495 and one other approved Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course will fulfill the WID graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in African American Studies: 18 s.h.

  • AAS 100: 3 s.h.
  • Select one of the following: AAS 251, 281, or 282: 3 s.h.
  • AAS Electives: 12 s.h.
    6 s.h. must be chosen from 300- and 400-level courses.

Minor in Religious Studies: 18 s.h.

  • REL 110, 111: 6 s.h.
  • Complete any four Religious Studies courses (3 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level): 12 s.h.

Minor in Women’s Studies: 18 s.h.

  • WS 190: 3 s.h.
  • WS 355: 3 s.h.
  • WS Electives: 12 s.h.

Course Descriptions

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (AAS)

100 Introduction to African American Studies. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A survey of the history of Black people including the “Cradle of Civilization,” the ancient empires of West Africa, the slave trade, and the Caribbean. It also includes African and African American literature, art, and music.

102 Survey of African American Studies II. (3) A survey of the history of Black people from 1864 to the present including contributions to African American history, literature, art, and music.

145 Famous People of African Descent. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A study of the lives and works of famous people of African descent throughout the world with particular emphasis on African Americans.

245 (Cross-listed with ENG 245) Survey of African American Literature. (3) A literary and cultural introduction to the study of African American writers, organized chronologically, but with special emphasis on the twentieth century. Not open to students with credit in ENG 245.

251 Social Problems in Black America. (3) A sociological investigation of such problems as crime and delinquency, racism, mental illness, drug use, alcoholism, and poverty. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

255 Migration and Urbanization of African Americans. (3) An introduction to migration patterns of free African Americans from 1865 to the present, with special emphasis on “push and pull” factors, geographical location, residential and school segregation, and physical and social mobility.

260 African American Music Survey. (3) A survey of the styles and figureheads of the African American music legacy. A historical approach beginning with the Trans-Atlantic slave trade through African American musical history. Genres will range from slave work songs to contemporary music of Black America. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or permission of the instructor.

262 African Americans and Hip Hop as Cultural Phenomenon. (3) An examination of the distinct elements of the hip hop phenomenon and its cultural influence on a global society. Prerequisite: AAS 260 or consent of the instructor.

270 Blacks and the Law. (3) This course familiarizes students with primary source materials including, but not limited to, case law and biographies. The course critically examines the assumptions about the Black struggle and the role of the law, demonstrating the gap between the promise and the practice of the U.S. Constitution.

281 Literature of the Black World. (3) (General Education/Humanities or Multicultural Studies) A comparative presentation of literary works by African, Caribbean, and African American writers.

282 African American Theatre. (3) (General Education/Fine Arts or Multicultural Studies) A survey of the African American contributions to the American stage from 1760 to the present, with an examination of representative works by various African American playwrights.

283 African American Folklore. (3) (General Education/Humanities or Multicultural Studies) A study of the relationship between African and Diaspora folktales, folk beliefs, and customs. Identification of parallel folktales, symbols, and social practices. An interdisciplinary approach to the study of this folklore.

290 Black Popular Culture. (3) The African roots of Black people and their contributions to American culture, emphasizing African American culture, artistic expression, identity, and contemporary Black popular culture.

302 Black Intellectual Traditions. (3) An examination of the dimensions of Black intellectual traditions and movements that have developed in the modern world. Prerequisite: AAS 100 and 102, or junior standing, or consent of instructor.

310 (Cross-listed with WS 310) Black Women in the Unites States. (3) A sociological analysis of the various social roles of Black women, including those of gender, education, occupations, and marriage and family, with some attention given to contributions and achievements. Not open to students with credit in WS 310.

311 (Cross-listed with POLS 311) Race and Ethnicity in American Politics. (3) This course examines how racial and ethnic minority groups shape, and are shaped by, American politics and society. It focuses primarily on the politics of specific racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. Not open to students with credit in POLS 311. Prerequisite: POLS 122 or permission of instructor.

312 Black Men in the U.S. (3) Examination of cultural, economic, political, and social factors impacting the experience of African American males in the United States. Topics may include Black male/female relationships, sexuality, self-determination, criminal justice system, family unit, community, and media representations. Prerequisite: AAS 100, or AAS 251, or consent of instructor.

313 (Cross-listed with HIST 313) African American History, 1400–1877. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) A survey of African American experiences in North America from 1400 to 1877. Not open to students with credit for HIST 313. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or AAS 100 or consent of instructor.

314 (Cross-listed with HIST 314) African American History, 1877–Present. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) A survey of the African American experiences in the United States since 1877. Not open to students with credit for HIST 314. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or AAS 100 or consent of instructor.

320 Black Male and Female Relationships. (3) Examination of contemporary societal problems affecting Black female-male relationships in the Americas including the effects of slavery; quality of relationships, sexism, economics, male scarcity, the Black community, family dynamics, institution of marriage, and relationship improvement strategies. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or 251 or consent of the instructor.

325 The Black Family. (3) An analysis of structures and functions of Black family life in the United States, with emphasis on adaptive features. Some attention is also given to the African and Caribbean family.

327 (Cross-listed with POLS 327) African Politics. (3) This course examines the nature of institutions and political rule in Africa before and after independence. Key topics include the colonial inheritance, ethnicity and social characteristics of African societies, and the nature and role of political institutions. Not open to students with credit in POLS 327. Prerequisite: POLS 267 or permission of instructor.

336 (Cross-listed with WS 336) Womanist Theory & Perspectives. (3) Introduction to African and African American women’s perspective, to enhance interest and understanding of the existing wide range of feminist scholarship in the U.S., and other feminine discourses pertaining to activism/contributions of Black women in Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean, and Europe. Not open to students with credit for WS 336. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or AAS 145 or AAS/WS 310 or WS 190 or permission of instructor.

346 (Cross-listed with ENG 346) African American Fiction. (3) A survey of selected African American short stories and novels from the beginning to the present, from Brown, Johnson, and Toomer to Ellison, Baldwin, Morrison, and beyond. Not open to students with credit in ENG 346. Prerequisite: AAS/ENG 245, or ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

349 (Cross-listed with HIST 349) Africa since 1800. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A study of major themes from 1800 to the present from an African perspective: slave trade and its abolition, European colonialism, independence movements, and problems of independence. Not open to students with credit in HIST 349. Prerequisite: HIST 116 or consent of instructor.

354 (Cross-listed with ENG 354) African Americans in American Film. (3) Analysis of the representation of African Americans in American films as a way to consider how imagery affects society’s attitudes about race. Films from early 20th century depictions of mammies to the 1990s hip-hop sagas will be examined. Not open to students with credit in ENG 354. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or consent of instructor.

360 African American Communities. (3) A study of development, demographic characteristics, social institutions, social stratification, and ruralurban differences of Black communities in the U.S. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

370 African American Interest Groups and Organizations. (3) An examination of African American interest groups organized around themes important to the African American community, analyzing the techniques and strategies used to shape U.S. policies and laws. Prerequisite: AAS 102 or consent of the instructor.

380 Media and the Black Experience. (3) A survey of the Black experience in the media, radio, television, cinema, and advertising. The course shall examine the roles of media in the Black struggle for equality in class, race, and gendered society. Emphasis may vary by semester. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or BC&J 350 or BC&J 352, or the consent of the instructor.

381 Modern African Literature. (3) A survey of African literature, both oral and written. This course will focus attention on the social, cultural, and political movements of modern Africa as presented in its literature.

397 (Cross-listed with ARTH 397) African Americans in Art. (3) The study of African Americans in art and visual culture from 1619 to the present. This course examines images of African Americans within a social, historical context as a way to understand evolving American perceptions about race, class, and gender. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Not open to students with credit for ARTH 397. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

400 Social and Political Thought of Black Americans. (3) An analysis and critique of ideologies relating to the achievement of full citizenship of Black Americans with emphases on: abolition, emigration, assimilation, nationalism, and Pan-Africanism. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor.

401 (Cross-listed with WS 401) African American Women and Dance. (3) Black women in modern dance, 1930s to the present, including relationships between the lived experience of African American women and their contributions to U.S. performance culture. Choreographers and dancers whose works have changed contemporary movement will be explored. Not open to students with credit in WS 401. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

402 (Cross-listed with HIST 402) The Civil Rights Movement. (3) An intensive study of the history of the African American civil rights movement, concentrating on the period from World War II through the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1978 Bakke decision. Not open to students with credit for HIST 402. Prerequisites: at least junior standing and either HIST 106 or AAS 100; or consent of instructor. Directed Elective Area I.

404 African Americans in the Age of Obama. (3) An examination of the trajectory of President Barack Obama’s life and his impact on the status of African Americans. Prerequisite: AAS 102 or consent of instructor.

415 African Americans and Sport in the United States. (3) An examination of how organized athletics have served as symbolic sites of protest, power, and inclusion for African Americans and other minorities in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: AAS 102 or consent of instructor.

417 Black Greek-Lettered Organizations. (3) An examination of the role and mission of historical existence, culture, and contemporary issues facing Black Greek-lettered organizations in the United States. Prerequisite: AAS 102 or consent of instructor.

420 (Cross-listed with SOC 420 and WS 420) Race, Class, and Gender. (3) The course will examine issues of race, class, and gender in historical, cultural, and contemporary societal contexts. Not open to students with credit in SOC 420 or WS 420. Prerequisite: AAS 100, or SOC 100, or WS 190; or permission of instructor.

425 African Americans, Corporate America, and Diversity. (3) An examination of racial and gender discrimination in American corporations. It explores the origins of Black businesses, Black independent selfhelp enterprises, and the agency of African Americans forging their own economic liberations through business activities and entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: AAS 102 or consent of instructor.

444 The Teaching of African American Studies. (3) A study and development of African American Studies curricula. Includes a study of the problems and procedures of teaching African American Studies, supervised study, pupils’ activities, organization, and development of teaching materials.

445 Critical Issues in the Education of African Americans. (3) Study of African Americans’ historical and contemporary struggles for educational access, equity, and excellence. Special emphasis given to the achievement gap, standardized testing, dropout/ retention rates, and alternatives to the sponsored curriculum such as Afrocentric education and culturally relevant pedagogy. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or instructor’s consent.

446 Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Desegregation. (3) An examination of the evolution and growth of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and desegregation in the United States. Prerequisite: AAS 302 or 445 or consent of instructor.

451 Research Methods in African American Studies. (3) An analysis of basic research methods used in African American Studies. It introduces, researches, and applies historical, anthropological, behavioral, and critical methods to African American Studies, viewed from an African-centered perspective. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: 9 s.h. of AAS core courses and junior standing, or permission of instructor, and ENG 280.

463 Honors Thesis in African American Studies. (3) Students will write original scholarly research/ academic findings in the AAS discipline, under faculty supervision. Thesis will follow completed fieldwork (AAS 363) of academic research, data collection (interviews, library work, oral history, observation) and relevant scholarly traditions of the discipline. Prerequisite: AAS 363(H).

466 (Cross-listed with GEOG 466—Africa) Geography of Africa. (3, repeatable for different regional subtitles to 9) (Global Issues) Analysis of the physical and cultural geography of Africa. Not open to students with credit for GEOG 466—Africa. Individuals who receive credit for AAS 466—Africa may take 6 s.h. maximum of GEOG 466 if the regional subtitles are different. Prerequisite: two courses in Geography or consent of instructor.

481 Postcolonial Theory and African Literature. (3) This course will address works of Anglophone, Francophone, and Lusaphone African writers in English translations; examine the basis of postcolonial literary theory, current trends, and how it relates to the contemporary reality of twenty-first century Africa. Prerequisite: AAS 100, or AAS 281, or AAS 381, or permission of instructor.

484 African Americans and the Fine Arts. (3) An interdisciplinary survey of the history and evolution of African American creative expression in the fine arts. Images, symbols, styles, techniques/content will be examined as well as the influence of social, political, and religious structures on the works of representative artists. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor.

487 African and Black Diaspora Performance Traditions. (3) An exploration of performance traditions including storytelling techniques, narrative, mime, masks, dance, musical, ritual, and other “total theatre” performance elements common to Africa and Black Diaspora. Prerequisite: AAS 282 or 283 or permission of instructor.

488 Black Speech and Language Communication. (3) Course covers historical and contemporary development and practice of Black communication behaviors. Pre-diasporan influences on Black communication styles, the role of oral communication during slavery, and issues such as the ongoing contentious debates about the use of Ebonics will be explored. Prerequisites: AAS 100 and junior standing, or permission of instructor.

490 Independent Study. (2–4, repeatable to 4) Individual study of a particular topic in the field of African American Studies.

491 Seminar in African American Studies. (1–6, repeatable to 6) Topics will vary from semester to semester, and will be announced prior to registration. Prerequisites: AAS 100 and junior standing, or consent of instructor.

494 (Cross-listed with REL 494) Religion in African American Culture. (3) This course acquaints students with religiosity and spirituality among African Americans and provides understanding of a world view, via concepts of nature, God, and human interaction, that reflects African cultural retentions in the U.S. Not open to students with credit for REL 494. Prerequisites: AAS 100 and junior standing, or one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course, or permission of instructor.

498 Individual Study. (1–3, repeatable to 3) Individual study of an approved research topic. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor.

499 Internship in AAS. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Supervised work assignments in applied occupational area involving specific projects in areas related to African American Studies. A maximum of 6 s.h. may be counted toward the African American Studies major. Prerequisites: permission of department chair; junior or senior standing; minimum 2.0 GPA.

ARTS AND SCIENCES (A&S)

196 Introduction to Research Methods. (0) An introduction to methodologies to plan and execute a research project with emphasis on data collection, analysis, and presentation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Graded S/U only.

LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES (LAS)

Formerly Arts and Sciences (A&S)

195 (Formerly A&S 195) Introduction to Liberal Arts and Sciences. (3) A comparative introduction to the major areas of the liberal arts and sciences. Students will learn how each area evolved and how each approaches problems and controversies. The course may take its particular focus each year from the University theme.

210 (Formerly A&S 210) Group Diversity. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) Study of cultural identities, values, and interaction of diverse groups. Among the concepts explored will be race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, ableism, and age.

298 (Formerly A&S 298) Individual Studies. (1–3) Special projects in Interdisciplinary Studies carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.

495 (Formerly A&S 495) Liberal Arts and Sciences Senior Capstone. (3) Capstone course for the Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences degree. Students will study examples of scholarship from a multidisciplinary perspective, research and present an interdisciplinary solution to a significant problem, and prepare a self-reflective academic personal narrative. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: LAS 195, ENG 280, senior standing, and permission of the director of the Liberal Arts and Sciences program.

496 Internship. (1–6, repeatable to 6) An internship provides LAS majors the opportunity to gain practical experience and apply their interdisciplinary skills and training through observation and interaction in a professional environment connected to their career interests. Prerequisites: LAS major, junior or senior standing, and permission of the program director. Graded S/U.

498 (Formerly A&S 498) Individual Studies. (1–3) Special projects in Interdisciplinary Studies carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL)

(Introductory Courses—Any introductory course may be taken as a first course in Religious Studies.)

101 Religion and Popular Culture. (3) (General Education/Humanities) An examination of religious and spiritual themes as they manifest in popular culture, including film, literature, Internet, television, arts, music, news media, etc. IAI: H5 900.

107 (Formerly REL 207) The Bible. (3) (General Education/Humanities) An examination of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and New Testament scriptures which shaped the intellectual and cultural history of Western civilization with emphasis on cultural, social, and historical factors leading to the birth of Judaism and Christianity. IAI: H5 901.

110 Introduction to Eastern Religions. (3) (General Education/Humanities or Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) A comparative introduction to the religions of Asia—Hinduism and Buddhism—with attention to historical development, scriptures, beliefs, practices, and diverse cultural expressions.

111 Introduction to Western Religions. (3) (General Education/Humanities or Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) A comparative introduction to the “religions of Abraham”—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—with attention to historical development, scriptures, beliefs, practices, and diverse cultural expressions.

(World Religions)

350 Hinduism. (3) (Global Issues) A study of the Hindu religious tradition covering its historical development, basic beliefs, practices, social structure, and philosophical world view, emphasizing the relation between this religion and society in both India and America. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

355 Buddhism. (3) (Global Issues) A study of the Buddhist religious tradition covering its historical development, basic beliefs, and practices, emphasizing the relation between this religion and society in the East and in America. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

360 (Formerly REL 203) Christianity. (3) Examines Christian scriptures, beliefs, and rituals from both historical and contemporary perspectives, with coverage of Christianity in different places around the world. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

365 Islam. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) A study of the Islamic religious tradition covering its historical development, basic beliefs, and practices, emphasizing the relation between this religion and society in the Near East and in America. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

370 Judaism. (3) An examination of the religion and history of the Jewish people including the relations of Judaism to Christianity and Islam and the causes of anti-Semitism. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

(Religion and Culture)

301 Religion in America. (3) An examination of the diversity of religion and religions in the United States with attention to the variety of religious traditions and expressions and to the histories and themes that have shaped the distinctive tapestry of American religious life. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

303 (Cross-listed with WS 303) Women in Religion. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A cross-cultural, comparative, interdisciplinary investigation of the presence of women in shaping the religious cultures of the world. Not open to students with credit in WS 303. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

324 (Cross-listed with ANTH 324) Religion, Magic, and Shamanism. (3) (Global Issues) Survey of cross-cultural perspectives on beliefs and practices dealing with the supernatural, magic, and religion. The functions and social positions of spiritual leaders from different cultures are explored. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 324. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

454 Contemporary Spiritual Movements. (3) An exploration of contemporary spiritual movements with special emphasis on the relationship between cultural change and the emergence of new religious movements. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

456 Religion and War. (3) (Global Issues) An examination of religious perspectives on the legitimacy of war, the conduct of war, and participation in or support for the military. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

457 Ritual and Performance in Religion. (3) An examination of ritual and performance in world religions including theoretical approaches to the study of ritual and performance and an investigation into the function of religious rituals and performances in the lives of practitioners. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

464 (Cross-listed with SOC 464) Sociology of Religion. (3) (Global Issues) An analysis of religious groups and institutions, a comparison of religion in sacred and secular societies, and the effect of religion on behavior and social institutions. Not open to students with credit in SOC 464. Prerequisites: SOC 100 and one additional Sociology course, or consent of instructor.

492 (Cross-listed with ENG 492) Religion, Literature, and Film. (3) (Global Issues) Study of multicultural literary and cinematic texts engaging a wide range of religious traditions. Not open to students with credit for ENG 492. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies or Philosophy course, or consent of instructor.

494 (Cross-listed with AAS 494) Religion in African American Culture. (3) This course acquaints students with religiosity and spirituality among African Americans and provides understanding of a world view, via concepts of nature, God, and human interaction, that reflects African cultural retentions in the U.S. Not open to students with credit for AAS 494. Prerequisites: AAS 100 and junior standing, or one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course, or permission of instructor.

(Religious Thought)

300 Religion, Ethics, and Law. (3) This course discusses the ways in which religions develop and sustain ethical traditions and how adherents of different faiths have worked to create or challenge laws based on those traditions. Topics include issues such as marriage, sexuality, war, and economics. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

380 Jesus. (3) A study of Jesus as pictured in the Gospels, history, and culture. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

405 Philosophy of Religion. (3) A critical examination of the philosophical issues arising from religious beliefs, utilizing historical and contemporary writings. Topics may include the existence of God, evil, faith, religious pluralism, and the relation between religious beliefs and ethics. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 405. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor.

452 Theology. (3) Introduction to theological thought and a selection of thinkers who have shaped Christian, Jewish, and/or Muslim religious imagination. Such figures might include Paul, Augustine, Aquinas, Maimonides, Luther, Teresa of Avila, Abraham Heschel, Simone Weil, al-Ghazali, or Rabia (among others). Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

460 The Bible and Current Issues. (3) Examines how Christians and Jews interpret the Bible in their reflections and debates about current issues. Possible topics may include (among others) gender norms, same-sex relationships, interreligious understanding, evolution, ecological concerns, apocalyptic thinking, and the nature of scriptural authority. Prerequisites: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

(Specialized Research)

312 Writing in Religious Studies. (1) Instruction and practice in writing a 20 page research paper within the field of Religious Studies. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisite: ENG 280. Corequisite: one 300- or 400-level Religious Studies course taught by Religious Studies faculty.

490 Capstone Project. (3) Selection of research project, preparation of bibliography, description of methodology, writing of senior thesis, oral defense, and participation in career-related seminars. Prerequisites: senior standing and REL 312.

499 Directed Readings. (1–3, repeatable for different topics, with no maximum) Individual study of particular religious traditions, ideas, or problems. Prerequisites: two courses in Religious Studies and consent of the instructor. By arrangement.

WOMEN’S STUDIES (WS)

190 Introduction to Women’s Studies. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) An exploration of women’s roles and their status in society with insights gained from various disciplines including History, Sociology, Psychology, and Literature.

220 (Cross-listed with PHIL 220) Feminism and Ethics. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A multicultural and comparative investigation of feminist issues in ethics and women’s contributions to moral theory. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 220.

265 Women and Creativity. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) This course explores some of the ways that women represent female experiences through creativity. Primary emphasis is on their contributions as producers and creators of various artistic forms. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

270 Hispanic Women. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) Emphasizing Hispanic women’s cultural production and activism, this course considers the diversity of perspectives and experiences of Hispanic women from a range of cultural and geographical backgrounds. Globally, Hispanic language, heritage, and culture constitute an important intersecting factor of identity.

280 Lesbianism and Gender Identity. (3) (General Education/Humanities) Using political and historical narratives of same-sex desiring women and women of other queer identities, this course will consider the diversity of perspectives, realities, and activism of these women as informed by their culture, race, class, and disability.

285 (Cross-listed with SOC 285) Women: A Global Perspective. (3) (General Education/Social Sciences or Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) This course emphasizes the voices of women across the globe from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special attention will be paid to women’s activism, the transnational feminist movement, and an examination of the category “woman” in the global context. Not open to students with credit in SOC 285. Prerequisite: WS 190 or SOC 100.

301 (Cross-listed with ENG 301) Women and Literature. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) The study of literature as an art practiced by women, with an examination of portrayals of women in literature. Not open to students with credit in ENG 301. IAI: H3 911D.

303 (Cross-listed with REL 303) Women in Religion. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A cross-cultural, comparative, interdisciplinary investigation of the presence of women in shaping the religious cultures of the world. Not open to students with credit in REL 303. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level Religious Studies course or consent of instructor.

307 (Cross-listed with ENG 307) Issues for Women Writing. (3, repeatable to 6 for different topics) Reading, discussion, and writing focused on a particular social, cultural, or personal issue related to how and what women write. Not open to students with credit in ENG 307. Prerequisite: ENG 299 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

310 (Cross-listed with AAS 310) Black Women in the Unites States. (3) A sociological analysis of the various social roles of Black women, including those of gender, education, occupations, and marriage and family, with some attention given to contributions and achievements. Not open to students with credit in AAS 310.

315 (Cross-listed with ANTH 315) Gender and Anthropology. (3) Exploration of cross-cultural ethnographies of variations in gender roles in economic, religious, and political domains. This course also addresses gender identity and gender diversity issues. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 315. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor.

316 (Cross-listed with COMM 315) Gender and Communication. (3) This course examines gender and gender-role differences and similarities in verbal and nonverbal communication and surveys several contexts in which sex differences in human communication occur. Not open to students with credit in COMM 315. Prerequisite: COMM 130.

317 (Cross-listed with HIST 317) Women in American History. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) A multicultural and historical survey of women in the United States, from 1500 to the present. Not open to students with credit in HIST 317. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or 106, or consent of instructor.

318 (Cross-listed with HIST 318) Women and Gender in European History. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) A study of women and gender in Europe, from antiquity to the present, focusing on changes in culture, society, the economy, and politics. Not open to students with credit in HIST 318. Prerequisite: HIST 115 or 116, or consent of instructor.

321 (Cross-listed with HE 321) Women’s Health. (3) Provides information about how women can improve their chances of achieving and maintaining high-level wellness. Among the topics included are: prevention, early detection and treatment of health problems commonly occurring among women, contraception, pregnancy and childbirth, using the medical care system, and mental health. Open to male and female students. Not open to students with credit in HE 321. Prerequisite: junior standing.

330 (Cross-listed with ANTH 330) Sex and Gender in Archaeology. (3) The study of sex, gender, and power in archaeological investigations and theory, including cross-cultural comparison of gender and social differentiation in past societies. Changing perspectives on the roles of females in human evolution and prehistory are emphasized. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 330. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or 111 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

335 (Cross-listed with POLS 335) Women and Politics. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) An examination of the changing role of women in American politics. Focus on women as participants in politics, public policies of concern to women, and feminist theories of political change. Not open to students with credit in POLS 335. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or 122, or permission of instructor.

336 (Cross-listed with AAS 336) Womanist Theory & Perspectives. (3) Introduction to African and African American women’s perspective, to enhance interest and understanding of the existing wide range of feminist scholarship in the U.S., and other feminine discourses pertaining to activism/contributions of Black women in Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean, and Europe. Not open to students with credit for AAS 336. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or AAS 145 or AAS/WS 310 or WS 190 or permission of instructor.

342 (Cross-listed with HIST 342) Women and Gender in Asian History. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) A study of women and gender in Asia from ancient times to the present, with an emphasis on social, political, economic, and cultural aspects of their lives. Not open to students with credit for HIST 342. Prerequisite: HIST 116 or consent of instructor.

355 Introduction to Feminist Theory. (3) A study of the theoretical foundations of modern feminist theory. Writings of early feminists such as Sara Grimke, Mary Wollstonecraft, Harriet Taylor, Sojourner Truth, Anna Julia Cooper, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are explored for their impact on the development of feminist thought. BGS online writing course. Prerequisite: WS 190 and one additional Women’s Studies course, or permission of instructor.

357 (Cross-listed with PSY 357) Women and Work. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) Examination of major psychological issues encountered by women entering the workforce, including career choice, combining work and family life, leadership, and inequities. Not open to students with credit in PSY 357. Prerequisite: PSY 100.

360 (Cross-listed with SOC 360) Gender and Society. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) This course provides a sociological examination of theories of gender, socio-historical gender patterns, gender and American social institutions, social structure and gender, and crosscultural comparisons. BGS online writing course. Not open to students with credit in SOC 360. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

370 Women in Popular Culture. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) A sociocultural study of stereotypes of women as portrayed in American popular culture with a particular emphasis placed upon the images of women of color. Prerequisite: WS 190.

391 Special Topics in Women’s Studies. (1–3, repeatable to 6) An in-depth investigation of special topics in the field of Women’s Studies. Prerequisites: WS 190 and permission of instructor.

395 (Cross-listed with ANTH 395) Gender, Race, and the Environment. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) Explores research, scholarship, and fictional ecofeminist works. Students will consider the influence of women, feminists, and ecofeminist writings on local and global environmental movements. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 395. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or WS 190 or consent of instructor.

401 (Cross-listed with AAS 401) African American Women and Dance. (3) Black women in modern dance, 1930s to the present, including relationships between the lived experience of African American women and their contributions to U.S. performance culture. Choreographers and dancers whose works have changed contemporary movement will be explored. Not open to students with credit in AAS 401. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

405 Women’s Spirituality. (3) This course will examine some of the predominant themes in women’s experience from a multicultural perspective as a means of understanding how women develop their spirituality. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

410 (Cross-listed with SOC 410) Women and Poverty. (3) The poverty of women in the United States including factors of race, place of residence, and age are covered. Structural hierarchies that maintain poverty are examined from a sociological perspective. Not open to students with credit in SOC 410. Prerequisite: WS 190 or SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

415 (Cross-listed with POLS 415) Politics of Reproduction. (3) This course examines reproduction as an issue of public interest and considers how public and private interests can conflict regarding women’s ability to control their reproduction. Not open to students with credit in POLS 415. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

420 (Cross-listed with AAS 420 and SOC 420) Race, Class, and Gender. (3) The course will examine issues of race, class, and gender in historical, cultural, and contemporary societal contexts. Not open to students with credit in AAS 420 or SOC 420. Prerequisite: WS 190, or AAS 100, or SOC 100; or permission of instructor.

430 (Cross-listed with SOC 430) Sociology of Women’s Health. (3) Uses sociological theories and research to examine the gendered experience of illness. Includes sociological analysis of medical knowledge about women’s health. Topics include medicalization of women’s health, the gendered hierarchy of professions, and feminist critiques of scientific research. Not open to students with credit in SOC 430. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

433 (Cross-listed with PSY 433) Psychology of Gender. (3) Examines the psychological, social, and biological bases for societal-defined sex roles. The knowledge of these factors will assist students in recognizing and understanding the influence of gender on human experiences (i.e., behaviors, cognitions, emotions, physiology) and relationships. Not open to students with credit in PSY 433. Prerequisite: 9 s.h. of Psychology coursework, or graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

435 (Cross-listed with SOC 435) Women and Crime. (3) Theories of female criminality, patterns of female crime and victimization, women in corrections, and women as criminal justice practitioners are examined. Not open to students with credit in SOC 435. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

455 Feminist Theory & Practice. (3) This course explores how contemporary feminist theory describes and explains women’s realities, focusing specifically on the intersections of women’s sexual diversity, race, and other identities. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 280; WS 355 or permission of instructor.

470 (Cross-listed with KIN 470) Gender and Sport. (3) Examines relationships between gender, sport, and physical activity. Gender is examined within the context of stereotypes and the structure/philosophy of sport and physical activity. Sport and physical activity are investigated as social institutions relative to cultural constructions of gender. Not open to students with credit in KIN 470. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

480 (Cross-listed with F L 480) Sexuality in German and Austrian Culture. (3) Examines the representation of sexuality in film, literature, and nonfiction of German-speaking countries in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Not open to students with credit for F L 480. Prerequisite: QS 100 or junior standing.

491 Women’s Studies Honors Thesis. (1–4, repeatable to 4) An independent study project or paper to be supervised by two members of the faculty in Women’s Studies. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Honors Program; senior status.

494 (Cross-listed with BC 494 and ENG 494) Women and Film/Television. (3) An overview of women in film and television that considers the onscreen images of women as well as the positions of women working behind the scenes (with laboratory). Not open to students with credit for BC 494 or ENG 494. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280.

497 Independent Study in Women’s Studies. (1–3, repeatable to 6) Individual readings and/or research on a topic within Women’s Studies. Prerequisites: WS 355 and permission of department chair.

499 Internship in Women’s Studies. (1–9, repeatable to 9) Supervised work in an applied occupational area related to women. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and permission of department chair.