Undergraduate Catalog

Engineering Technology

Interim Chairperson: Prof. Rafael Obregon
Office (ET): Knoblauch Hall 135
Telephone (ET): (309) 298-1091; Fax (ET): (309) 298-1061
E-mail (IDT): engrtech@wiu.edu
Website (ET): wiu.edu/engrtech
Office (IDT): Knoblauch Hall 135
Telephone (IDT): (309) 298-1952; Fax (IDT): (309) 298-1061
E-mail (IDT): IDT@wiu.edu
Website (IDT): wiu.edu/idt

Program Offerings and Locations:

  • Bachelor of Science in Construction and Facilities Management: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in Construction and Facilities Technology: Macomb
  • Minor in Industrial Technology: Macomb, Online
  • Minor in Manufacturing Technology: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in Operations Management: Macomb, Quad Cities

For student learning outcomes, please see wiu.edu/provost/learningoutcomes.

Faculty: Gravitt, Hall, H. Hemphill, L. Hemphill, Higgins, Hsu, Hunter, Kim, Obregon, Payne, Stone, Thurman.

The Department of Engineering Technology offers a Bachelor of Science in Construction and Facilities Management, and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology.

The degree in Construction and Facilities Management is designed to educate students to apply advanced materials and design techniques as solutions to construction problems. The comprehensive curriculum combines technical education with instruction in current design and methods employed in industry. Students learn to organize the available workforce, materials, and equipment to design, manage, and support projects. Graduates are prepared to take a managerial/supervisory role in the processes involved in industry.

The degree in Engineering Technology is designed to represent the practical application of mathematics, science, and engineering to real-world operation, production, and service problems. Students learn to organize and optimize resources to develop, create, operate, maintain, and manage projects. The program includes a strong foundation in hands-on learning coupled with business management principles and practices.

The department offers minors in Construction and Facilities Technology, Industrial Technology, Manufacturing Technology, and Operations Management.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are encouraged to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Honors in the Major, or General Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). General Honors includes General Honors coursework. Honors in the Major includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Honors in the Major and General Honors. View more information about honors curricula or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science—Construction and Facilities Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Construction and Facilities Management must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 54 s.h.
    CSTM 132, 230, 234, 236, 260, 301, 302, 320, 337, 345, 348, 430, 433, 434, 440, 460, 493† (3 s.h.); ET 105
  3. Directed Electives: 6 s.h.
    Choose 6 s.h. from the following:
    CSTM 336; ET 344, 345, 346; HRM 353; RPTA 482
  4. Open Electives: 7 s.h.
  5. Other: 23 s.h.
    1. ACCT 200 or 201 or 307: 3 s.h.
    2. ECON 100 or 231 or 232: 3 s.h.
    3. GEOL 110: 4 s.h.
    4. MATH 103: 3 s.h.
    5. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    6. PHYS 114 or 150: 4 s.h.
    7. STAT 171: 3 s.h.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course (including CSTM 440); or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

† CSTM 493 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science—Engineering Technology

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology must complete I, II, III, and IV below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 57 s.h.
    ET 105, 207, 241, 261, 320, 344, 345, 356, 367, 403, 446, 448, 468, 477, 481, 482, 493 (9 s.h.)†
  3. Other*: 33 s.h.
    • CHEM 101: 4 s.h.
    • CS 114 or 214 or 225 or 488: 3 s.h.
    • ECON 100 or 231 or 232: 3 s.h.
    • MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    • MGT/OM 352: 3 s.h.
    • MATH 128, 129: 6 s.h.
    • PHYS 114, 115: 8 s.h.
    • STAT 171: 3 s.h.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major

’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

† ET 493 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

* 13 s.h. may count toward the University General Education requirement.

Minors

Minor in Construction and Facilities Technology: 18 s.h.
  1. Required Courses: 12 s.h.
    CSTM 132, 230, 234, 348
  2. Choose 6 s.h. from the following: 6 s.h.
    CSTM 236, 260, 301, 302, 336, 337, 345, 430, 433, 434, 440, 460; ET 105, 344, 346
Minor in Industrial Technology: 18 s.h.
  1. ET 105: 3 s.h.
  2. 15 s.h. chosen from the following: : 15 s.h.
    1. ET Electives from any area of specialization as approved by the department academic advisor
    2. MGT 349
    3. MGT/OM 352
Minor in Manufacturing Technology: 21 s.h.
  1. Required Courses: 9 s.h.
    ET 105, 241, 345
  2. Choose 12 s.h. from the following: 12 s.h.
    ET 207, 261, 344, 356, 367, 403, 446, 468, 477, 481, 482
Minor in Operations Management: 18–21 s.h.
  1. ACCT 201* and 202*, or (preferred) ACCT 307*: 3–6 s.h.
  2. ET 344, 345; HRM 353; MGT/OM 352; SCM 457: 15 s.h.

* Business majors should consult with their academic advisor.

Course Descriptions

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (CSTM)

132 Introduction to Construction Management. (3) Introduction to the field of Construction and Facilities Management. Includes the study and application of methods, systems, processes, tools, and equipment that are common to current industry practices in the built environment. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

230 Construction Documents and Plan Reading. (3) A comprehensive study of the common construction documents including plan reading methodologies, bid documents, addenda, and basic quantity take-off of construction materials. Corequisite: MATH 103 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

234 Construction Systems and Concepts. (3) Construction systems and concepts including relationships between materials used in construction. Content includes basic materials used in residential and commercial structures. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSTM 132. 3 hrs. lect.

236 Surveying for Construction. (3) An introduction to surveying methods used in the construction industry. Students will learn surveying techniques for roads and building sites. Conventional as well as electronic surveying equipment will be used. Not open to students with credit in AGTM 461. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

260 Construction Statics and Strength of Materials. (3) A study of structural factors that influence the development of building design. Survey of statics and strength of materials with an introduction to structural planning and preliminary structural design for temporary structures related to Construction Management. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

301 Residential Architectural Design. (3) The study of residential architectural design including drawing setup, architectural programming, site plan, floor plan layouts, elevation, construction details, and 3D modeling using current industry software. Provides students with the foundational knowledge of blueprint creation for residential building construction projects. Prerequisite: ET 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

302 Commercial Architectural Design. (3) A study of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for commercial construction teaching students the basic skills to develop and use BIM on a project for construction planning, documents, cost estimating, and highquality 3D designs utilizing current industry software. Prerequisite: CSTM 301. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

320 (Cross-listed with ET 320) Professional Preparation. (3) Prepares and enables students to gain skills and experience with the professional internship search process and career success. Topics include cover letters, resume preparation, networking, job searching, interviewing, professional business communications, presentations, and industry appropriate correspondence specific to the major. Not open to students with credit in ET 320. Prerequisites: Engineering Technology major, Construction and Facilities Management/Technology major or minor, Engineering Technology major, or Manufacturing/Industrial Technology minor; and sophomore standing.

336 Aggregate Based Materials. (3) A study of residential and commercial uses of aggregate materials as structural systems with a focus upon aggregate, Portland cement concrete, and asphalt cement concrete. Laboratory experiences include application techniques. Prerequisite: CSTM 234. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

337 Electrical and Mechanical Systems. (3) A study of electrical and mechanical systems. Content includes electrical, plumbing, and HVAC system design; lighting, acoustics systems selection, and utilization for energy conservation. Sustainable energy options and trends for all systems will also be introduced. Prerequisite: CSTM 234. 3 hrs. lect.

345 Construction Scheduling. (3) A study of planning and scheduling practices used by the construction industry. Scheduling logic, productivity and durations, resource leveling, cost loading, critical path issues, and applications of computer software for the creation of construction project schedules are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or permission of instructor. Pre- or co-requisites: CSTM 230 and 234, or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

348 (Formerly CSTM 448) Construction Occupational Safety and Health. (3) A study of the Federal OSHA Act as it applies to the construction industry. Beyond federal regulations, the course includes accident prevention plans, safety education, and documentation preparation. Pre- or co-requisite: CSTM 234 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

356 (Cross-listed with ET 356) Introduction to Power Systems. (3) A study of electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Emphasis upon structural and behavioral characteristics of components used in the generation, transmission, and control of power systems used in contemporary industry. Not open to students with credit in ET 356. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 114 or 115 or 150 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

430 Construction Estimating. (3) A study of construction industry estimating techniques and practices for both residential and commercial construction. Students will practice estimating with both simulation exercises and actual construction projects. Computer software will be utilized in this course. Prerequisite: CSTM 230 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

433 Legal Aspects of Construction. (3) A comprehensive review of legal aspects of construction for managers. Topics include contracts/agreements, liens, bonds, insurance, codes, certification, laws, and ethics. Prerequisite: CSTM 230 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

434 Construction and Facilities Management. (3) Summarizes the project management issues in both Construction and Facilities Management professions. Includes Construction and Facilities Planning, Capital Projects Management, Real Estate, and Human Resource Management as they link to current technology relevant to new and existing constructed works. Prerequisites or Corequisites: CSTM 345, 430, and 433; ET 346 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

440 Green and Sustainable Construction. (3) (Global Issues) Comprehensive coverage of green and sustainable construction principles, materials, and methods. Sustainable construction rating systems will be discussed with the focus on LEED criteria. Prerequisite: 75 hours of completed college coursework or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.

455 Construction Management Seminar. (1–3) Each offering provides students with an opportunity for intensive study in specialty topics reflective of the variety in Construction Management. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 3 s.h. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

460 Soils and Foundations for Construction. (3) A course on basic principles of structural soils and structure foundations, soil classification implications, and applications for the construction industry. Prerequisite: CSTM 260. 3 hrs. lect.

470 Facilities Management Capstone. (3) Summarizes the construction option of study in Facilities Management combining areas of Facilities Planning, Capital Projects Management, Real Estate, and Human Resource Management as they link to current technology. Prerequisites: RPTA 482, ET 346, and senior standing. 3 hrs. lect.

492 Independent Study. (1–3, repeatable to 6) Selection and exploration of a specific area of Construction Management or planning issue, solution of a specific construction industry problem, in-depth study of specific areas of construction, or exploration and/ or achievement of a relevant professional certification. Prerequisite: Senior college standing, 21 s.h. of CSTM coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (3, repeatable to 9) Off-campus work experience in construction. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; ENG 280; CSTM 348. A cumulative minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA 2.00 in the major/minor, and approval of department chair. Graded S/U only.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (ET)

105 (Cross-listed with ENGR 105) Engineering Graphics. (3) An introduction to drafting including shape description, geometric construction, orthographic and isometric drawing, sectioning, dimensioning, and applied descriptive geometry. Basic dimensioning, tolerancing, and pictorial drawings will be covered. An introduction to computer based drafting. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. IAI: EGR 941.

207 Geometric Modeling. (3) Principles and techniques of basic computer aided drafting and the application of software to produce two-dimensional and three-dimensional drawings and designs. Not open to students with credit for ENGR/ET 482. Prerequisite: ENGR/ET 105. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

241 Manufacturing Processes. (3) An introduction to production processes in manufacturing industries. Laboratory assignments will involve processing plastic and composite materials, along with welding and casting of metals. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

261 Machine Tool Production. (3) The theory and operation of machine tools and precision measuring instruments. Laboratory assignments will involve material removal processes. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

293 Industrial Work Experience. (1–3, repeatable to 3) This course will enable students to gain experience in manufacturing, construction, or graphic communication in a supervised and approved industrial environment. Written weekly reports, along with a final report, are required. Students will be under the general supervision of both the University instructor and the industrial supervisor. Evaluation of each student’s work will result from combined observations of all supervisors. This work experience will provide students an opportunity to apply basic industrial skills to the industrial work involved and enable them to better begin to understand the principles to be mastered for more advanced work. Completion of three 40-hour work weeks required for each semester hour of credit. Prerequisites: major in the Department of Engineering Technology and permission of instructor.

320 (Cross-listed with CSTM 320) Professional Preparation. (3) Prepares and enables students to gain skills and experience with the professional internship search process and career success. Topics include cover letters, resume preparation, networking, job searching, interviewing, professional business communications, presentations, and industry appropriate correspondence specific to the major. Not open to students with credit in CSTM 320. Prerequisites: Engineering Technology major, Construction and Facilities Management/Technology major or minor, Engineering Technology major, or Manufacturing/Industrial Technology minor; and sophomore standing.

321 Industrial Plastics and Composites Fabrication. (3) The study and application of composite and plastic materials, forming, molding, and other industrial processes. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

344 Continuous Improvement: Lean Practices. (3) Comprehensive study of non-value-added practices, their financial impact, and techniques/tools used to reduce or eliminate them. Lean principles are emphasized. Includes 5S, Kanban and supermarket systems, Poka Yoke, Value Streams, setup reduction, Visual Control, and corrective action. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 3 hrs. lect.

345 (Cross-listed with ENGR 345) Continuous Improvement: Quality. (3) The study of Continuous Process Improvement. Students will learn about PDCA/ DMAIC models, fundamental quality tools, FMEA, minimizing variation through Statistical Process Control, process capability studies, reliability, VOC, layered audits, and performance metrics. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 345. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 3 hrs. lect.

346 Facilities Design. (3) This course covers manufacturing facilities design and material handling. The course will focus on facilities design, equipment, production flow analysis, cost justification, and material handling systems. Students will be involved in case studies, economic models, and problem solving of manufacturing systems. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 3 hrs. lect.

356 (Cross-listed with CSTM 356) Introduction to Power Systems. (3) A study of electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Emphasis upon structural and behavioral characteristics of components used in the generation, transmission, and control of power systems used in contemporary industry. Not open to students with credit in CSTM 356. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 114 or 115 or 150 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

367 Computer Numerical Controlled Machining. (3) Introductory and advanced applications of numerically controlled machines. Laboratory experiments will include both off line and machine programming of CNC mills and lathes. Prerequisite: ET 261 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

403 Design and Prototype Development. (3) Engineering and technology research, design, and development strategies are emphasized to develop the creativity, critical thinking, and innovation skills necessary to generate new products, identify product ideas, and design, develop, test, analyze, and successfully fabricate a prototype. Prerequisites: ET 207 and 241; or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

446 Material Science. (3) The study of metallurgy, plastics, and ceramics with emphasis on properties, structure, testing, and heat treatment for the design, manufacture, and failure analysis of materials. Stress, strain, and deformation tests will be included. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

448 Industrial Safety. (3) A study of the Federal OSHA Act as it applies to both industry and construction. Beyond federal regulations, the course includes accident prevention plans, safety education, and documentation preparation. 3 hrs. lect.

455 Engineering Technology Seminar. (1–3) Each offering provides students with an opportunity for intensive study in specialty topics reflective of the variety in Engineering Technology. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 3 s.h. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

468 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Machining. (3) The study and application of graphics and language based CAM systems for 2½D machining and 3D surfacing on numerically controlled machines, including cellular production team projects. Prerequisites: ET 207 and 367. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

477 Programmable Control and Data Acquisition. (3) A study of programmable logic and data acquisition control systems used to monitor and update facilities, machines, and equipment. Topics include signal conditioning; A-D conversions; decision models; ladder, state, and object oriented programming; data logging and differential control. Prerequisite: one of the following: CS 114, CS 211/212, CS 214, CS 225, CS 488, or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

481 Robotics Systems. (3) A comprehensive study of the mechanics, electronic, and computer technologies required to design and implement robotic systems. Prerequisites: PHYS 114; CS 114, CS 212, CS 214, CS 225, CS 488, or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

482 (Cross-listed with ENGR 482) Parametric Modeling. (3) The application of computer aided design techniques utilizing industrial software within a minicomputer and workstation environment. Not open to students with credit for ENGR 482. Prerequisite: ET 207. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

492 Independent Study. (1–3, repeatable to 6) Selection, exploration, and solution of a problem in an area of Manufacturing Engineering. Prerequisites: senior college standing, 26 s.h. or ET coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (3–12 in 3-hour blocks, repeatable to 12) Off-campus work experience in manufacturing. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; prerequisites as related to the student’s technology option selected; ENG 280. A minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA of 2.00 from courses completed within the major, and approval of program coordinator. Graded S/U only.

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION (GCOM)

111 Graphic Communication Foundations. (3) Overview of the Graphic Communication Industry. Topics include the history and conventional techniques used in printing, hardware and software tools used in the industry, and basic principles and methods used in the creation of print and non-print-based layouts. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

112 Introduction to Graphic Communication. (3) A study of the Graphic Communication industries including composition, photoconversion, press work, and finishing operations. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

117 Introduction to Electronic Publishing. (3) A study of terms, programs, and equipment used in electronic desktop publishing. An introduction and exposure to a variety of electronic desktop publishing programs and tools. Emphasis is upon design, layout, and execution of techniques used in publishing. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

122 (Cross-listed with ARTS/BC&J/IDT 122) Introduction to Emerging Design Technologies. (3) Introduction to concepts and issues related to emerging design technologies. Topics include ethical considerations, production design process, design decision-making process, and design principles. Course will conclude with an overview of career options and introduction to portfolio preparation. Not open to students with credit for ARTS/BC&J/IDT 122.

212 Introduction to Digital Image Manipulation. (3) The theory and practice of color, line, and halftone image scanning. Activities include: color separations, corrections, and working with halftones. Prerequisite: GCOM 112. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

213 Introduction to Graphic Illustration. (3) A study of illustration software with emphasis upon operational skills and techniques used in creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional illustrations. Prerequisites: GCOM 112 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

218 Introduction to Interactive Media Production. (3) An introduction and overview of using web authoring and content management tools for developing and producing online content. Emphasis on understanding foundations, terminology, identifying webpage elements, and technical aspects for creating basic online interactive documents and presentations for web publishing. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

314 3D Print and Web Technologies. (3) Focus is on the creation of three-dimensional objects for a wide range of uses in industry. Topics include the use of animation and modeling for product visualization and multiple internet applications. Prerequisites: GCOM 117 and GCOM 218; or consent of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

316 Production Printing. (3) Printing production techniques are utilized throughout this course allowing the opportunity to view and practice the fundamental printing production methods used in the graphic communication industry. Prerequisites: GCOM 117 and 212, or instructor approval. 1 hr. lect.; 4 hrs. lab.

318 Intermediate Interactive Media Production. (3) An exploration and construction at an intermediate level of complex documents and presentations for web publishing. Emphasis on the technical aspects of using advanced techniques, hardware, and web authoring software and content management tools toward developing effective interactive online environments. Prerequisite: GCOM 218. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

320 Professional Preparation in Graphic Communication. (3) This course will prepare and enable students to gain skills and experience with the professional internship search process for career success. Topics will include cover letters, resume preparation, networking, job searching, interviewing, professional business communications, presentation, correspondence, and portfolio development. Prerequisite: Graphic Communication major and sophomore standing. 3 hrs. lect.

412 Advanced Digital Image Manipulation. (3) The use of digital image manipulation equipment in creating special effect images. Emphasis will be placed upon advanced color theory, color separation, and digital enhancement. Prerequisite: GCOM 212. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

413 Packaging and Display Technologies. (3) An overview of packaging and display technologies. Emphasis on terminology, applications, processes, materials, and substrates, as well as conventional and digital technical aspects of creating basic packaging and point of purchase displays. Prerequisite: GCOM 213. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

414 Advanced Image Transfer and Printing Processes. (3) The study of advanced printing and image transfer systems and processes. Emphasis will be upon supervised experience in a Graphic Communication lab. Prerequisite: GCOM 213. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

415 Printing Production Management. (3) The study and application of estimation and production practices in the publishing industry. Emphasis will be on methods, planning, production, estimating, and techniques characteristic of the publishing industry. Prerequisite: GCOM 212. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

417 Advanced Electronic Publishing. (3) Advanced work with electronic desktop publishing programs. Emphasis will be upon advanced design and layout techniques. Projects include multiple page documents, forms, booklets, and brochures. Integration of work from multiple software programs will also be stressed. Prerequisites: GCOM 117 and 213 or consent of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

419 Advanced Interactive Media Production. (3) The focus of this course is on website development. Topics will focus on HTML as well as a variety of WYSIWYG editors and hardware. Site planning and adding graphics and other media (video, animations, etc.) will also be discussed. Prerequisite: GCOM 318. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

422 (Cross-listed with ARTS/BC&J/IDT 422) Applied Emerging Design Technologies. (3) The course allows students to focus on personal portfolio development using emerging technologies. Students will also have the opportunity to work collaboratively on real-world projects that apply principles in emerging technologies. Not open to students with credit for ARTS/ BC&J/IDT 422.

423 Advanced Graphic Illustration. (3) Advanced hands-on experience with illustration software for creating technical graphics. Emphasis on employing advanced technical processes to create technicallycorrect, two-dimensional and three-dimensional illustrations for use in various printed and electronic media. Prerequisites: GCOM 212 and 213. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

455 Graphic Communication Seminar. (1–3) Each offering provides students with an opportunity for intensive study in specialty topics reflective of the variety in Graphic Communication. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 3 s.h. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

492 Independent Study. (1–3, repeatable to 6) Selection, exploration, and solution of a problem in an area of Graphic Communication. Prerequisite: Senior college standing, 21 s.h. of GCOM coursework, and approval of department chairperson. GPA requirement of 2.50 in major.

493 Internship. (3–12 in 3-hour blocks, repeatable to 12) Off-campus work experience in Graphic Communication. Written weekly reports required. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Recommend completion before entering last term on campus. A maximum of 9 s.h. may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisites: junior/ senior standing; prerequisites as related to the student’s technology option selected; ENG 280. A minimum GPA of 2.00, a minimum GPA of 2.00 from courses completed within the major, and approval of program coordinator. Graded S/U only.

INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY (IDT)

406 Advanced Topics in Photography. (3) Advanced camera and darkroom controls for processing and printing both black and white and color. Prerequisite: IDT 240.

408 Large Format Photography. (3) Introduction to the large format view camera and its controls. Studio, available, and location lighting will be used with a variety of different subjects and props in both black and white and color. Prerequisite: IDT 240.

433 Instructional Three-Dimensional Modeling and Animation. (3) Instructional uses of three-dimensional modeling and animation are explored including basic modeling tools, virtual camera controls, materials, video production, and lighting. Prerequisite: ARTS/BC&J/ GCOM/IDT 122 or IDT 250, or permission of instructor.

460 Instructional Virtual Reality Design. (3) Focuses on the integration of virtual reality technologies for instruction and training. Provides opportunities to develop instructional/training virtual environments utilizing virtual reality authoring systems. Prerequisite: IDT 355 or permission of instructor.

480 Advanced Web-Based Instruction. (3) Emphasizes the potential of Internet technology to foster interactivity in design of performance solutions. Students move beyond static Web page creation to advanced incorporation of resources in support of highly interactive forms, database creation and management, and client/server integration. Prerequisite: IDT 250 or permission of instructor.

(Professional Education)

278 Assistive Technology for Students with Special Needs. (1) Explores the research on using assistive technology devices with children with special needs, offers pre-service teachers the opportunity to develop the technological skills needed to work with children included in the regular classrooms who are required to use these technologies. Provides hands-on experience using these devices. Open only to students in the Teacher Education Program (TEP).

285 Technology Integration Standards for Pre- Service Teachers. (3) Introduces pre-service teachers to fundamental concepts, skills, and attitudes for applying technology in educational settings, as defined by ISTE National Technology Standards for Teachers and ISBE Technology Standards for All Illinois Teachers. Open only to students in the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Prerequisite: successful completion of the Technology Competency Assessment (TCA), or permission of instructor.

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (OM)

352 (Cross-listed with MGT 352) Operations Management. (3) Foundations for Operations Management as practiced in contemporary organizations. Focus is on the efficient and effective value-adding transformation of inputs into goods and services in both internal and external value chains. Extensive use of mathematics and statistics is involved. Not open to students with credit in MGT 352.