Undergraduate Catalog

Kinesiology

Chairperson: Dr. Renee L. Polubinsky
Office: Brophy Hall 212
Telephone: (309) 298-1981; Fax: (309) 298-2981
Website: wiu.edu/kinesiology

Program Offerings and Locations:

  • Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Physical Education: Macomb
  • Minor in Coaching: Macomb
  • Minor in Nutrition: Macomb
  • Minor in Scuba Diving: Macomb
  • Minor in Sports Health and Wellness: Macomb

For student learning outcomes, please see wiu.edu/provost/learningoutcomes.

Faculty: Bories, Chapel, Gabbei, Gurzell, Hyllegard, Kanauss, Kovacs, Murray, Narvaez, Piper, Plos, Polubinsky, Radlo, Shupe, Walter.

Kinesiology is an academic discipline that involves the study of physical activity and its impact on health, society, and quality of life. Undergraduate students in the Department of Kinesiology at WIU may choose to major in Exercise Science, Nutrition and Dietetics, Nutrition and Foodservice Management, or Physical Education. Common to all majors is a focus on the body from psychological, biological, and physiological perspectives, as well as an appreciation of an active and healthy lifestyle.

Students majoring in Exercise Science are prepared for a wide variety of kinesiology-related fields. Graduates of the program work in cardiac rehabilitation, health/fitness facility management, personal training, strength and conditioning, and employee wellness to name a few. In addition, the Exercise Science degree can provide students with the necessary prerequisites and field experience that will make them strong candidates for future study in athletic training, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant programs.

The Physical Education degree program leads to Illinois state licensure in grades K–12. The curriculum focuses on the development of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to positively impact K–12 student learning. To achieve this goal, we offer coursework and a variety of field experiences that focus on the use of evidence-based practices, differentiated instruction, technology, and varied assessments to plan and implement instruction in ways that promote student growth and achievement.

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics degree program’s mission is to prepare graduates with the knowledge expected of those entering a supervised practice program leading to eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist. The curriculum is designed to facilitate the intellectual, personal, and professional growth of students and to encourage them to be lifelong learners. The Nutrition and Dietetics program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), located at the headquarters of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at 120 Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606; telephone (800) 877- 1600. Graduation is based on completion of requirements of the accredited Nutrition and Dietetics major requirements and fulfillment of University requirements.

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management provides students with the competencies, knowledge, and experiences required of nutritional and foodservice professionals working in nutrition services and the foodservice industry. Career opportunities exist in hospitals, long-term care, schools, correctional facilities, senior living facilities, and other commercial and noncommercial foodservice industries. The curriculum covers areas such as the science of food and human nutrition, the principles and practices of food production, foodservice operation systems, and safety and sanitation. Opportunities to participate in professional meetings, advisory council seminars, field trips, travel tours, Study Abroad programs, and to complete an internship program exist for all students.

GradTrac is available to Nutrition and Dietetics and Nutrition and Foodservice Management majors. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are encouraged to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Honors in the Major, or General Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). General Honors includes General Honors coursework. Honors in the Major includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Honors in the Major and General Honors. View more information about honors curricula or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics must complete I, II, and III below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

*Students with a career objective of becoming a registered dietitian must complete a program of study which meets the accredited Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics at WIU. (These program competencies must be met prior to the application to an accredited dietetic internship.) *Please note that students/interns will need to have a master’s degree in order to take the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist after January 1, 2024.*

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 57 s.h.
    1. HM 250, 251, 253, 353: 9 s.h.
    2. NUTR 109**, 152, 153, 209, 300**, 301, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408†, 409, 410, 438: 48 s.h.
  3. Other: 41 s.h.
    1. CHEM 101**, 102**, 221**#: 12 s.h.
    2. ECON 100** or 231** or 232**: 3 s.h.
    3. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    4. KIN 290, 291: 6 s.h.
    5. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    6. MICR 200**: 4 s.h.
    7. PSY 100**: 3 s.h.
    8. STAT 171** or equivalent: 3 s.h.
    9. ZOOL 200**: 4 s.h.
    10. FR/GER/SPAN 224** (recommended)

* Students with a career objective of becoming a registered dietitian must complete a program of study which meets the accredited Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics at WIU. (These program competencies must be met prior to the application to an accredited dietetic internship.)

** May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

 

**# Does not count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; or 3) NUTR 300.

† NUTR 408 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science—Exercise Science*

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h. A grade of Cor better is required in all Kinesiology (KIN) courses required for the major. A 2.5 GPA in the major is required before internship clearance.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
    (To include NUTR 109 and one of BIOL 100, BIOL 101, or ZOOL 200)
  2. Department Core Courses: 12 s.h.
    KIN 270, 359, 391, 392
  3. Major Core Courses: 32 s.h.
    1. KIN 170, 300, 343, 347, 440, 444†, 463: 20 s.h.
    2. Internship: KIN 400: 12 s.h.
  4. Major Elective Courses: 15 s.h.
    1. KIN 290 or ZOOL 330: 3–4 s.h.
    2. KIN 291 or ZOOL 331: 3–4 s.h.
    3. Choose 7–9 s.h. from:
      KIN 247, 248, 319, 369, 396, 401, 464, 473: 7–9 s.h.
  5. Open Electives: 18 s.h.

* For successfully meeting established criteria, the National Strength and Conditioning Association officially recognizes Western Illinois University’s educational program in Strength and Conditioning.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program.

† KIN 444 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management must complete I, II, III, and IV below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. I. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 66 s.h.
    1. HM 151, 250, 251, 253, 254, 353, 354, 356, 359, 451, 458: 26 s.h.
    2. NUTR 109**, 152, 153, 190, 203, 206, 209, 300**, 305, 307, 308, 404, 408†, 440: 40 s.h.
  3. Directed Electives: 7 s.h.
    Select 7 s.h. from the following courses:
    HM 256, 358, 452; NUTR 301, 304, 306, 379, 405, 450 (Healthy Cooking), 450 (Weight Management)
  4. Other: 23 s.h.
    1. BIOL 101**: 4 s.h.
    2. ECON 231**: 3 s.h.
    3. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    4. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    5. MICR 200**: 4 s.h.
    6. PSY 100**: 3 s.h.
    7. STAT 171**: 3 s.h.

** May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing NUTR 300.

† NUTR 408 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science—Physical Education (Comprehensive Major)

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education must complete I, II, III, and IV below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 124 s.h. Teacher Education will require additional hours.

In accordance with the Illinois State Board of Education licensure rule, all candidates seeking a Professional Education License or endorsement are required by Western Illinois University to obtain a grade of “C-” or better in all directed general education courses, all core courses, and all courses in the option. This rule does not supersede course prerequisite requirements in the catalog that specify a letter grade.

Please see the Teacher Education section of this catalog for more information about WIU’s Teacher Education Program.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
    Must include a General Education mathematics course
  2. Department Core Courses: 15 s.h.
    KIN 270, 290, 359, 391, 392
  3. Major Core Courses: 38–39 s.h.
    1. Movement Content: KIN 102 or 108; PETE 115, 124, 135, 226, 251, 252, 253, 255
    2. Professional Courses: KIN 369; PETE 160, 250, 265, 325, 365, 393, 395, 461, 477†
  4. Other: 28 s.h.
    1. RDG 387: 2 s.h.
    2. EDUC 439: 3 s.h.
    3. C&I 403; EDS 202, 301, 401: 11 s.h.
    4. STCH 480 and 483: 12 s.h.

# The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) a designated foreign language requirement [see Foreign Language/Global Issues Requirement]; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) any major’s discipline-specific global issues course; or 4) an approved Study Abroad program. † PETE 477 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Coaching: 19–20 s.h.
  1. Required Courses: 13 s.h.
    KIN 271, 272, 294, 466, 472
  2. Choose one of the following courses: KIN 270, 290, 359, 493: 3 s.h.
  3. Choose two of the following courses: KIN 247, 451, 454, 459: 3–4 s.h.
Minor in Nutrition: 18 s.h.
  1. NUTR 109, 209, 305, 404: 12 s.h.
  2. Select 6 s.h. from the following courses: 6 s.h.
    NUTR 203, 300, 301, 304, 306, 308, 379, 405, 407, 408, 450 (Sports Nutrition), 450 (Weight Management), 450 (Healthy Cooking)
Minor in Scuba Diving: 16 s.h.
  1. KIN 108, 208, 308, 408: 8–10 s.h.
  2. Select 6–8 s.h. from the following courses: 6–8 s.h.
    EM 251, 252, 276, 304; ET 364; Foreign Language—FR, GER, PORT, SPAN; GEOL 115; HE 251; HM 254, 255, 453; IDT 406, 408; KIN 359; FS 210; MGT 125, 349; PHYS 100; RPTA 249, 362, 367, 376, 460, 462, 466; SPA 121, 122; ZOOL 414, 415, 416, 452
Minor in Sports Health and Wellness: 20 s.h.
  • KIN 194, 286, 294, 384, 396, 397, 450, 484, 494, 496

Course Descriptions

ATHLETIC TRAINING (AT)

200 Lower Extremity. (3) Assessment and immediate care of athletic injuries of the lower extremity. Prerequisites: AT 110; KIN 292 and KIN 293 or concurrent registration in these courses and permission of program director. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

210 Upper Extremity. (3) An in-depth study of athletic injuries involving the upper extremity. Evaluation, immediate care, and rehabilitation of these injuries are discussed. Prerequisites: AT 110; KIN 292 and KIN 293 or concurrent registration in these courses and permission of program director. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

211 Clinical Education and Experience in Athletic Training I. (1) Instruction, practice, and evaluation of NATA clinical proficiencies and clinical experience in clinical settings. Prerequisite: permission of program director.

300 Therapeutic Modalities. (3) An introduction to the physiological principles and operational procedures of contemporary therapeutic modalities as they relate to the immediate care, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Prerequisite: admission to ATEP and permission of the program director. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

301 Clinical Education and Experiences in Athletic Training II. (1) Continuation of instruction, practice, and evaluation of NATA proficiencies, and experience in clinical settings. Prerequisite: AT 211 and permission of the program director.

305 Therapeutic Exercise. (3) Concepts and principles of rehabilitation program design including determination of goals, progressions, and criteria for return to competition. Includes fundamentals of therapeutic exercise principles for common rehabilitation protocols. Prerequisite: admission to ATP and permission of the program director. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

310 Head, Neck, Spine, and Abdomen. (3) Assessment and care of athletic injuries including the regions of the head, neck spine, and abdomen. Prerequisites: KIN 292, KIN 293, and permission of the program director. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

311 Field Experience in Athletic Training I. (1) Field experience in Athletic Training in various clinical settings. Also includes continuation of practice and evaluation of NATA clinical proficiencies. Prerequisites: AT 301 and permission of the program director.

315 Advanced Rehabilitation Techniques. (2) Instruction and application in rehabilitation program design and progression strategies for various pathologies and diagnoses will be explored. Prerequisites: AT 300, AT 305, and junior status. 1 hr. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

401 Field Experience in Athletic Training II. (1) Continuation of Field Experience I. Practice and evaluation of NATA clinical proficiencies. Prerequisites: AT 311 and permission of the program director.

403 Pharmacological Issues in Athletic Training. (3) Study of pharmacological issues in Athletic Training. Prerequisites: admission to ATP and permission of the program director.

405 Medical Conditions and Pathologies in Athletic Training. (3) Study of the pathology of general medical conditions common to athletes and physically active individuals. Prerequisite: admission to ATP and permission of the program director.

410 Athletic Training Administration. (3) Development and administration of an Athletic Training program including employment, documentation, budget, and facilities. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: permission of the program director; ENG 280.

411 Athletic Training Professional Preparation. (1) Preparation, practice, and assessment of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies in Athletic Training. Prerequisites: AT 401 and permission of the program director.

413 Senior Seminar in Athletic Training. (1) Foundational behaviors of professional practice in Athletic Training. Prerequisite: senior standing in Athletic Training program.

420 Internship. (12) An internship with an approved affiliated site, under the supervision of a Certified Athletic Trainer; designed for the practical application of knowledge and theory in a professional setting. Prerequisites: Admission to ATP and permission of the program director.

KINESIOLOGY (KIN)
(Kinesiology Courses)

102 Swimming. (1) (General Education/Human Well-Being) For individuals who have some experience and feel comfortable in the water. The individual should be able to move on the face and back and should have had some experience in deep water. Front crawl, back crawl, elementary back stroke, breast stroke, side stoke, fall-in dive, standing front dive, and surface dive will be taught.

108 Open Water Scuba. (2) Provides classroom and confined water work needed to scuba dive safely in open water. Certification is available, but not required. Must be able to swim 250 yards continuously, tread water 10 minutes, and swim underwater 50 feet. Physical examination required.

118 Aerobic Dancercise. (1) (General Education/ Human Well-Being) Concepts and principles of aerobic dance movements; routines consisting of different beats, tempo, and movement forms.

121 Badminton. (1) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Beginning level skills and techniques and appreciation for the game of badminton.

123 Golf. (1) Beginning level skills, techniques, knowledge, and etiquette. A one-time lab fee of $15 will be charged for this class.

127 Riflery. (1) Ammunition charge.

128 Tennis. (1) (General Education/Human Well- Being) Beginning skills, strategies, and rules used to play the game of tennis.

131 Aerobic Conditioning. (1) (General Education/ Human Well-Being) Designed to acquaint students with cardiovascular endurance exercise. Various training programs will be introduced which are directed at conditioning of the vital organs.

140 Personal Fitness Program. (1) (General Education/Human Well-Being) After initial assessment, each student undertakes an individualized conditioning program designed to improve the function of his/her cardiovascular system.

142 Conditioning. (1) A course emphasizing physical fitness and weight control. Much time is spent on conditioning exercises and their benefits. Correct posture is also covered.

145 Pickleball. (1) Indoor net game for beginners and advanced players alike.

146 Court Sports. (1) Beginning level skills, techniques, and rules used to play various court sports including but not limited to pickleball, team handball, badminton, and tennis.

147 Weight Training. (1) (General Education/ Human Well-Being) Includes learning skills of beginning weight training through familiarity with various types of strength training machines.

149 Stress Management and Relaxation Techniques. (1) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Designed to help one learn causes, consequences of, and techniques for handling stress through a systematic mind-body approach. Progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, visualization, deep breathing, as well as other techniques will be taught to help relieve stress and muscle tension.

150 Outdoor Sports. (1) Beginning level skills, techniques, and rules used to play various field sports including but not limited to Frisbee, flag football, soccer, and softball.

151 Basketball. (1) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Includes basic skills, strategies, and rules for games of basketball.

154 Football. (1) Skills, strategy, and rules of play.

155 Soccer. (1) Skills, strategy, and rules of play.

158 Volleyball. (1) (General Education/Human Well- Being) Includes basic skills, strategies, and rules for the game of volleyball.

170 Introduction to Exercise Science. (3) An introduction to concepts of physical wellness with an emphasis on fitness and eating strategies. Designed to help students develop an understanding of the field of Exercise Science.

194 Introduction to Sports Health and Wellness. (1) Overview of allied health disciplines, legal guidelines, and ethical principles as related to sports health and wellness.

208 Advanced Open Water Scuba. (2) Students will learn to navigate underwater and dive at night. Each student will also choose three scuba specialty areas to gain diving experience. Certification available, but not required. Must have a current scuba physical exam on file. Prerequisite: KIN 108 or permission of instructor.

247 Olympic Weightlifting. (1) Designed to enhance the individual’s power development and overall performance as well as increase his/her knowledge of plyometric training and Olympic lifting techniques.

248 Advanced Strength Training. (1) Methods of manipulating exercise selection, technique, sets, reps, rest, and intensity for improving overall body symmetry and appearance. Training and principles will focus on the skills needed by the modern day personal trainer, strength coach, athletic trainer, and other fitness professionals. Majors only or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: KIN 147.

270 Motor Behavior. (3) Introduction to psychomotor learning and theoretical models of skill acquisition. Selected topics will include neurological structure and function, theory of motor control, scheduling of practice, use of feedback, and motor coordination.

271 (Formerly KIN 371) Principles of Coaching. (3) Theory and methodology relevant to coaching at any competitive level. Course content will focus on preparation for American Sport Education Program (ASEP) Certification credential necessary to coach scholastic sports in Illinois and other states.

272 Coaching Practicum. (1) 40 clock hours of observation and practice in coaching under direct supervision of scholastic or collegiate level coach. Prerequisites: KIN 271 and 294.

286 Functional Anatomy and Physiology. (3) Introduction of principles and application of anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics for sport and physical activities.

290 Anatomy & Physiology I. (3) An examination of the structural organization and function of the human body with an emphasis on the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

291 Anatomy & Physiology II. (3) A study of normal human anatomy and physiology. Topics include respiration, digestion, metabolism, urology, special senses, reproduction, and endocrinology. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

292 Palpatory Anatomy. (2) This course will offer the student an opportunity to learn physical palpation skills. These skills are critical to an accurate and timely physical assessment within the practice of athletic training, physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise science, and fitness. Prerequisite: KIN 290 or permission of instructor. 1 hr. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

293 Manual Muscle Testing. (2) This course will offer the student a practical experience in assessing muscular strength, endurance, and neurological deficits using manual testing procedures. These skills are critical within the practice of athletic training, physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise science, and fitness. Prerequisite: KIN 290 or permission of instructor. 1 hr. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

294 (Formerly KIN 394) Management of Athletic Injuries. (3) The role of the coach in preventing sport injuries, recognizing injury mechanisms, and providing emergency care. Laboratory sessions emphasize wrapping, taping, and emergency first aid. Includes Red Cross First Aid and CPR training and certification. Prerequisite: KIN 286 or 290 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

300 Fitness for Older Adults and Special Populations. (3) Development of leadership skills, assessment techniques, and program designs necessary to be an effective fitness professional for older adults and selected special populations (e.g., arthritis, asthma, obesity, fibromyalgia, etc.). Students will be involved in hands-on learning. Prerequisites: KIN 170, 290, 391, and CPR certification; or permission of instructor.

308 Scuba Diving Specialties. (2, repeatable to 4) Instruction in rescue and at least two other diving specialties (e.g., deep, night, dry suit, ice, cave, wreck) within the realm of recreational scuba diving. Certification available, but not required. Must have a current scuba physical exam on file. Prerequisites: KIN 208 with certification or permission of instructor.

319 Exercise Psychology and Stress Management. (3) Theories, concepts, and principles of exercise psychology and stress management will be covered with focus on skills necessary to be an effective exercise psychologist and fitness and wellness professional of stress management techniques. Prerequisite: KIN 170.

343 Cardiovascular Exercise Principles and Assessment. (3) Development of leadership skills and assessment techniques for cardiovascular exercise. Principles will focus on the theories and skills necessary to develop and lead appropriate cardiovascular programs. Prerequisite: KIN 170, 391.

346 Candidate Physical Ability Test Preparation for Firefighters. (2) The knowledge and physical activities required for the successful completion of the Candidate Physical Ability Test for firefighters will be simulated and practiced in this course. Prerequisites: FS 300, 301, or permission of instructor.

347 Strength and Conditioning Principles and Methods. (3) Development of leadership skills and assessment techniques for resistive exercise. Principles will focus on the skills necessary to be an effective fitness professional of resistive exercise and other weight training techniques. Prerequisites: KIN 170, 290.

359 Sport Psychology. (3) An introduction to sport psychology theories and research including application to performance enhancement. Selected topics include motivation, confidence, stress and anxiety, team dynamics, performance enhancement, and professional and ethical issues. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or permission of instructor.

369 Motor Development. (3) A study of the process of change in perception, acquisition, and performance of physical skills across the lifespan. Prerequisites: KIN 270, 290. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

370 Advanced Techniques of Performance/ Management. (1, repeatable for different subjects/ performance to 6) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Graded S/U only.

384 Field Experience in Sports Health I. (1, repeatable to 2) Minimum of 30 hours at an assigned on-campus field experience with a focus in sports health and wellness, providing care to student-athletes during practices or events while under the supervision of an Athletic Trainer. Prerequisite: KIN 294 or permission of instructor.

391 Physiology of Exercise. (3) A study of the physiological responses to exercise including acute effects, training adaptations, and health related benefits. Specific topics covered include exercise metabolism, neurological and endocrine regulation of exercise, cardiovascular and respiratory physiology, environmental influences, and ergogenic aids. Prerequisite: KIN 290. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

392 Biomechanics. (3) The integrated study of applied anatomy and applied mechanics to the analysis of human motion. Prerequisite: KIN 290 and MATH 123 or higher. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

396 Surface Palpations and Manual Muscle Testing. (2) Hands-on assessment of anatomical landmarks and muscle function through palpation and manual muscle testing skills. These skills are critical within the practice of athletic training, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and exercise science. Prerequisite: KIN 286 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

397 Injury Recognition. (3) Instruction on how to recognize an injury and understand the severity using appropriate classifications. Common terminology unique to the sports healthcare world will be addressed. Prerequisite: KIN 294 or permission of instructor.

400 Internship. (12) An internship in an approved program; designed as laboratory field experiences for practical application of knowledge and theory in a professional setting. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA in the major, C- or better in all KIN coursework, and permission of instructor.

401 Senior Seminar in Exercise Science. (2) Practical and theoretical information for professional career situations. Prerequisites: senior standing; Exercise Science major.

408 Divemaster. (2, repeatable to 4) Students complete supervised dives, perform dive briefings, act as safety/rescue divers, and lead underwater tours to learn to be responsible Divemasters and eligible for employment. Must have a current scuba physical exam on file. Divemaster certification available, but not required. Prerequisites: KIN 308, Dive Rescue certification, or permission of instructor.

440 Exercise Stress Testing. (3) Designed to provide an in-depth study of the theories, concepts, procedures, and techniques of exercise stress testing. Prerequisites: KIN 391, CPR Certification, and permission of instructor.

444 Exercise and Wellness Programming. (3) Administration of exercise science and wellness programming with special attention given to leadership skills and assessments necessary to direct exercise and wellness programs. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: senior standing, KIN 440, and permission of instructor; ENG 280.

450 Professional Workshops in Sport and Exercise. (1–3, repeatable to 6) Examination and analysis of current topics, trends, or problems in sport and exercise. Content varies according to contemporary issues. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

451 Basketball Coaching. (2) Beginning and advanced strategies for coaching basketball at the high school and collegiate levels.

454 Football Coaching. (2) Beginning and advanced strategies for coaching football.

459 Individual/Team Sport Coaching. (2, repeatable for different topics to 4) Beginning and advanced strategies for coaching individual or team sports other than basketball, football, or volleyball (e.g., tennis, golf, swimming, soccer, baseball, softball, or track and field). Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

460 Observation and Practice. (1, repeatable for different topics to 2) Preservice practical experiences in Kinesiology activity courses under the supervision of staff. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

463 Personal Training. (2) Provides practical application of theoretical information in personal training for Exercise Science students. Prerequisites: KIN 440, 2.5 GPA in major, and senior status—majors only.

464 Field Experience in Exercise Science. (1) A 30-hour field experience in Exercise Science settings for the practical application/observation of theory and skills. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, permission of instructor, and one of the following: KIN 300, 343, or 347.

466 Organization and Administration of Athletic Teams. (3) Study of administrative principles, policies, laws, and ethics as they relate to budget, finance, equipment, staff, facilities, and public relations for the management and promotion of athletic teams. Prerequisite: KIN 271.

470 (Cross-listed with WS 470) Gender and Sport. (3) Examines relationships between gender, sport, and physical activity. Gender is examined within the context of stereotypes and the structure/philosophy of sport and physical activity. Sport and physical activity are investigated as social institutions relative to cultural constructions of gender. Not open to students with credit in WS 470. Prerequisite: WS 190 or permission of instructor.

471 Practicum in Coaching. (1) 40 clock hours of observation and practice under the supervision of a middle school or high school teacher, coach, or outside agency administrator. Prerequisites: KIN 451, 454, or 459, and permission of instructor. Observation and coaching will be required in an outside setting.

472 Coaching Internship and Capstone. (3) A 120 clock hour coaching capstone experience under the supervision of a coach and university supervisor. Students will help prepare a team for competition, manage a team culture, and evaluate athlete performance. Prerequisite: KIN 272.

473 Practicum in Adapted Physical Activity Motor Clinic. (1, repeatable to 4) Interdisciplinary practicum experience (30 hours per semester) working with PreK–12 students with disabilities in a physical activity setting. Students will get hands-on experiences along with opportunities for collaboration with undergraduate and graduate students from various majors across campus. Prerequisites: SPA 381, SPA 385, PETE 393, PSY 221, RPTA 251, SPED 210, or permission of instructor.

484 Field Experience in Sports Health II. (1, repeatable to 2) Minimum of 30 hours at an assigned on- or off-campus field experience with a focus on sports health and wellness, providing care to studentathletes during practices or events while under the supervision of an Athletic Trainer. Prerequisite: KIN 294 and 384, or permission of instructor.

485 Independent Study. (1–3, repeatable for different topics to 3) Individualized study of a particular topic or problem in the field of Kinesiology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Student must secure approval for independent study prior to semester registration.

490 Honors Thesis in Kinesiology. (3) Independent thesis project resulting in a substantial original research paper and oral presentation. Students will work under the direction of one or more members of the Kinesiology Department faculty who will oversee and evaluate the project. Prerequisites: junior or senior honors major in Kinesiology, with good standing in the Centennial Honors College. Approval of thesis advisor(s).

493 (Cross-listed with RPTA 493) Sport and Recreation for Individuals with Disabilities. (3) The course will provide students with information about sport and recreation opportunities for individuals with disabilities across the lifespan at all levels from community programs to elite levels of competition. Not open to students with credit in RPTA 493. Prerequisite: PETE 393, RPTA 251, or consent of instructor. Laboratory charge for course and field trip is required.

494 Advanced Techniques for Injury Management. (3) Techniques in sports health and wellness for advanced emergency care, rehabilitation of injuries, and application of protective equipment. Prerequisite: KIN 294 or permission of instructor.

496 Advanced Sports Health and Wellness. (2) Concepts covering general medical conditions, pharmacology, target populations, and crisis management in the sports health and wellness industry. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

(Physical Education Methods)

439 Methods and Materials in Physical Education. (3) Planning, developing, and teaching Physical Education content at the secondary level. Includes a field experience at the middle or high school level. Grade of C- or better required. Prerequisite: EDS 301; PETE 115, 124, 135, 226, 251, 252, 253, 365; fully accepted in the Teacher Education Program (TEP). 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

NUTRITION (NUTR)

109 Introduction to Nutrition. (3) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Basic principles of human nutrition related to maintenance of optimum nutritional status.

152 Principles of Food Preparation. (2) Study of the principles of food selection, basic preparation techniques and methods, evaluation, and safety. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HM 151. Corequisite: NUTR 153.

153 Principles of Food Preparation Lab. (1) Practice and application of selected principles of food selection, basic preparation techniques and methods, evaluation, and safety of food products. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HM 151. Corequisite: NUTR 152. 3 hrs. lab.

190 (Cross-listed with ATM 190 and HM 190) Introduction to Professional Practices. (1) This course is designed to introduce DFMH majors to program expectations specific to their careers. Students will be exposed to a variety of resources to aid them in their studies. Not open to students with credit in ATM 190 or HM 190.

203 (Formerly NUTR 303) Child Nutrition. (2) Evaluation of the nutrition needs and problems of children and examination of the foodservice and nutrition components in programs designed for children. Activities outside of class may be required. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

206 Nutrition and Foodservice Management Practicum. (3) A course designed to give students practicum experience in the nutrition and/or foodservice management industries. Prerequisites: HM 151; NUTR 109, 152, and 153.

209 Intermediate Nutrition. (3) Presents an intermediate-level overview of the digestion and metabolism of the macronutrients. Reviews descriptive and analytic research methods and basic statistics. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

300 Food and Culture. (3) (General Education/ Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) Overview of the socio-cultural aspects of food and habits. The study of the cultural influences on food in different global societies including nourishment, health beliefs and practices, religion, cross-cultural communication, and health status outcomes. Prerequisites: permission of department.

301 Food Science Theory and Applications. (3) Basic food science principles and applications in the field of dietetics. Prerequisites: NUTR 109, 152, and 153; CHEM 101; or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

304 Nutrition Informatics. (3) Nutrition research as the basis for evidence-based practice in dietetics, including additional focus on locating professional literature and evaluating research on nutrition and dietary supplements. Prerequisites: NUTR 209; STAT 171 or SOC 323.

305 Nutrition Throughout the Life Span. (3) Evaluation of nutritional needs and problems and identification of community nutrition programs for individuals at different stages of the lifespan. Prerequisite: NUTR 109. Activities outside of class may be required.

306 Nutrition Science I. (3) A study of the physiological and biochemical aspects of nutrition. Prerequisites: NUTR 209; CHEM 101 and 102.

307 Nutrition Field Study. (1) Field study to take students as a group outside of the Macomb area to bridge their didactic program to a range of observations included in dietetic practice. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor. There will be a $50 fee for this class.

308 Nutrition for the Older Adult. (3) Evaluate the nutrition needs and problems of older adults, and examine the foodservice and nutrition components in programs designed for older adults. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

379 Nutrition Travel Studies. (3) Studies of international and domestic properties, facilities, and agencies related to the nutrition industry. Prerequisite or corequisite: NUTR 109.

404 Nutrition Assessment. (3) Methods of screening and assessment of nutritional status including clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements. Prerequisite: NUTR 209.

405 Nutrition Science II. (3) Biochemical and physiological basis of nutrients in metabolism and their interrelations. Research methodology used in nutrition. Prerequisite: NUTR 306.

406 Medical Nutrition Therapy I. (3) A study of the physiological and biochemical basis for using therapeutic diets for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and renal conditions among others. Prerequisite: NUTR 404.

407 Dietetics Communications and Education. (3) Dietetics communication and education theories and applications. Counseling theories and methods of changing food behavior. Prerequisite: Permission of department.

408 Community Nutrition. (3) Community nutrition programs in the United States. Development and evaluation of community nutrition programs. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280. Activities outside of class may be required.

409 Dietetics Practicum. (1) Practicum provides students with the opportunity to experience various aspects of dietetics including clinical, foodservice management, and community nutrition in a practical setting. Prerequisites: NUTR 307 and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

410 Medical Nutrition Therapy II. (3) A study of the physiological and biochemical basis for using therapeutic diets for GI disorders, pulmonary diseases, and cancer among others. Prerequisites: NUTR 404.

438 Dietetic Pre-Internship. (1) Researching accredited dietetic internships. Completion of DICAS application and other professional documents. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

440 Nutrition and Foodservice Management Internship. (9) Supervised field experience for application of theory and skills in an agency or property approved by the department. Prerequisites: senior standing; HM 458; GPA of 2.5 in four of the following courses: HM 353, HM 354, HM 451, NUTR 209, NUTR 408; site approved by department; approval of internship coordinator or department chair. Graded S/U only.

450 Professional Workshops in Nutrition. (1–3, repeatable with no limit) These courses are intended for majors in Nutrition and Foodservice Management, minors in Nutrition, and others interested in the field. They are offered in the topic areas of Healthy Cooking (1 s.h.), Sports Nutrition (2 s.h.), and Weight Management (1 s.h.). Prerequisite: NUTR 109 or permission of instructor.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION (PETE)

115 (Formerly KIN 115) Social Dance Forms. (1) Basic fundamentals of ballroom movement. Beginning levels in Fox Trot, Lindy, Waltz, Polka, and country western dances.

124 (Formerly KIN 124) Educational Gymnastics. (1) Performance and analysis of educational gymnastics skills appropriate for children. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

135 (Formerly KIN 135) Lifelong Leisure Activities. (2) Surveys contemporary noncompetitive activities suitable for participation throughout the lifetime. Examples include hiking, walking, rope challenge course, and adventure activities. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

160 (Formerly KIN 160) Introduction to Physical Education. (2) Introductory course in Physical Education that presents educational and professional responsibilities and foundations of Physical Education. Designed to help students considering a career in Physical Education to formalize their decision to study Physical Education. Requires 10-hour field experience.

226 (Formerly KIN 226) Net/Wall Games. (2) Content knowledge and skill development in movement concepts and tactics associated with games where a ball is sent to a wall or over a net (e.g., tennis, badminton, volleyball). Development of resource notebook required. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

250 (Formerly KIN 250) Instructional Foundations in Physical Education. (2) Theoretical and philosophical foundations of instruction and learning in Physical Education with opportunities to apply these essential concepts. Grade of C- or better required. Prerequisites: KIN 270; PETE 160.

251 (Formerly KIN 251) Invasion Games. (2) Content knowledge and skill development in movement concepts and tactics associated with invasion games (e.g., basketball, soccer, flag football, floor hockey). Development of resource notebook required. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

252 (Formerly KIN 252) Contemporary Physical Activities. (1) Content knowledge and skill in movement concepts associated with contemporary physical activities (e.g., yoga, Pilates, tai chi). Development of resource notebook required. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

253 (Formerly KIN 253) Target/Field Games. (2) Content knowledge and skill development in movement concepts and tactics in games where balls are pitched, hit, and fielded (baseball, softball) or where the objective is to place an object into a target (bowling, golf). Development of resource notebook required. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major.

255 (Formerly KIN 255) Elementary Movement Fundamentals. (2) Development of knowledge and skill in fundamental movement skills, movement concepts, and basic elements of dance. Designed to provide a content base for elementary school Physical Education programs. Prerequisite: PETE 160.

265 (Formerly KIN 265) Skill Analysis and Assessment in Physical Education. (2) Techniques in analyzing motor skills and selecting and designing assessments of student learning in physical education. Emphasis on performance-based assessment. Prerequisite: PETE 160.

325 (Formerly KIN 325) Principles of Health- Related Fitness for the Physical Educator. (3) Principles of health-related fitness and policies of wellness in school-based Physical Education programs. Focusing on application, development, assessment, and teaching of cardiovascular and strength training principles. Prerequisite: Physical Education Teacher Education major or Coaching minor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

360 (Formerly KIN 360) Methods of Elementary Physical Education. (2) Introduction to teaching Physical Education in K–5. Designed especially for the elementary classroom teacher candidate. May include some field experiences and outside teaching assignments. Not open to Kinesiology majors.

365 (Formerly KIN 365) Physical Education for the Elementary Grades. (3) Planning a curriculum of educational games, gymnastics, and dance based on a movement analysis and exploratory approach. Content centers on curriculum and teaching methodologies for grades K–5. Grade of C- or better required. Prerequisites: KIN 270; PETE 124, 160, 250, 255, 265; fully accepted in the Teacher Education Program (TEP). 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

393 (Formerly KIN 393) Physical Activity for Learners with Exceptionalities. (3) Characteristics of individuals with disabilities across the lifespan. Emphasis on modifications and instructional strategies for physical activity in the physical education, recreation, sports, and fitness settings. Includes clinical experience. Grade of C- or better required for Teacher Education majors. Prerequisite: KIN 290 or RPTA 251 or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

395 (Formerly KIN 395) Assessment in Adapted Physical Education. (2) Content centered on purposes, methods, appropriate tools, and processes of assessment (referral, screening, assessment, program implementation, and evaluation) for individuals with disabilities. The focus of the assessment will be in the areas of motor skills and physical fitness. Prerequisites: PETE 265 and 393.

461 (Formerly KIN 461) Field Experiences. (1) 30- hour observation and teaching experience in area K–12 Physical Education programs with on-campus seminars sessions. Grade of C- or better required. Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDUC 439 in the Department of Kinesiology and PETE 477; fully accepted in the Teacher Education Program (TEP).

477 (Formerly KIN 477) Physical Education Curriculum. (3) Planning, sequencing, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate and standards driven Physical Education curricula in K-12 Physical Education programs. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: acceptance into the Teacher Education Program (TEP); ENG 280. Corequisite: PETE 461.