Campus Connection - October 30, 1998
Campus and Community Section

Table of Contents

Five Faculty Named Outstanding Teachers and Adviser

Four WIU faculty members have been named Outstanding Teachers for 1998 in their respective colleges, and an Outstanding Academic Adviser has been named. Each honoree is awarded a $250 stipend from the WIU Alumni Council as well as a $250 line item award and a recognition plaque from Western's Faculty Development Office.

Western's 1998 Outstanding Teachers include Mark Boley, assistant physics professor, College of Arts and Sciences; Thomas Drinka, agriculture professor, College of Business and Technology; Sharon Evans, communication professor, College of Fine Arts and Communication; and Linda Meloy, associate professor, College of Education and Human Services, at the WIU Regional Center. The Outstanding Academic Adviser is Philip Weiss, undergraduate academic adviser in the communication department.

Boley, who earned his bachelor's (1987) and master's (1989) degrees from WIU and his doctorate (1993) from the University of Missouri, has taught at Western since 1994. He was selected for this honor based on teaching and supporting students; involving students in research, independent studies and professional publications and presentations; and making improvements in the department's introductory courses.

"Before students can enjoy and succeed in the learning process, students must recognize that the teacher loves to teach them, that he loves the study of his subject material, and that it gives him no greater joy than to know that he has imparted knowledge to his students in an understandable, beneficial and memorable manner," Boley said.

"No time spent helping students will ever be considered wasted time," he added. "I want students to remember me as having made physics exciting and challenging on a personal level, and as encouraging them to go out and explore the physical world for themselves."

Drinka, whose futures trading and commodities courses have been named by Farm Futures magazine as among the best courses in the world, has taught at WIU since 1982. He is the author or coauthor of nearly 100 publications and papers; four of his courses are disseminated throughout the United States by Western's extended learning program; and since 1996 he has used the Internet as an important tool in his teaching.

"Commodity trading is a learnable skill," Drinka said. "Our curriculum emphasizes the fine detail required to implement a trading program for commercial or speculative purposes. Our students receive much of this fine detail in the department's trading room, a state-of-the-art laboratory in which we receive real-time market information from commodity futures and options exchanges in Chicago, London and Singapore."

Evans, who has taught at Western 14 years, is the broadcasting division director in the department of communication. She teaches students how to produce daily newscasts, call play-by-play for sports and interview and work in a broadcast quality television studio.

"The opportunity to teach on the university level is something I truly enjoy, but it's demanding," Evans said, "It demands that one stay current in the issues of one's field. It also demands that one continually challenges oneself to find better ways to communicate information to students.

"With increased use of technology in the delivery of educational information, teaching will demand that teachers be more innovative in the presentation of course material," she added.

Meloy has been based at WIU's Regional Center in the Quad Cities during her eight years of University service. Her audience of learners is nontraditional in that they are almost exclusively mature adults with families and jobs, who attend night and weekend classes for certification and job advancement, she said.

"These adult learners from Illinois and Iowa demand three things from me in addition to keeping them awake: their 'money's worth' in regard to current and accurate course content; material and works tasks that are relevant to their lives and jobs; and flexibility in almost everything, from meeting times to assignment choices to completion time-lines," Meloy added.

Weiss advises approximately 400 majors and 75 minors enrolled in three communication programs: broadcasting, communication sciences and disorders, and public communication/ human relations. He said his advising principles emphasize three main elements: focusing on students' academic goals, contributing to a sense of order and meaning to the pursuit of a college career, and treating students as individuals.

At the conclusion of each semester, Weiss writes personal notes to a majority of his majors, congratulating them for accomplishing goals and earning honors and admonishing them for weak academic performances. He said each student should receive several of these notes throughout his or her academic career.

"It has been reported that many of my memos wind up affixed to refrigerator doors," Weiss said.


Thomas Campbell Named 10th Morrow Lecturer

Thomas Campbell, vice president of academic and student services at Illinois Central College, and WIU alumnus, has been named the 10th annual Roger M. and Jean S. Morrow Distinguished Lecturer at WIU.

The Morrow Lecture, held in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the College of Arts and Sciences, will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11 in the Union Sandburg Theatre. Campbell's presentation, "Leadership in the New Millennium: Building Models on Fundamental Science Principles," is open free to the public.

A Monmouth native, Campbell attended WIU when Roger Morrow chaired the physics department. Campbell earned his bachelor's (1966) and master's (1967) degrees in physics from WIU and his doctorate (1977) in science education from the University of Nebraska.

He began his career as a physics instructor at Illinois Central College in 1967. He has served ICC in a variety of administrative roles, being named vice president of academic and student services in 1993.

Campbell was elected to governing board of the American Association of Community Colleges and has served that organization since 1994 as board member. Since 1995 he also has served on the executive board of the State of Illinois Chief Academic Officers organization.

Campbell is the winner of Glenn Schmitz Award, presented by the National Council for Staff Program and Organizational Development.

Caterpillar Foundation Donates to Placement Office The Caterpillar Foundation recently donated $1,000 to the WIU Occupational Information and Placement Office.

The donation reflected a 25 percent increase over previous years awards, according to Al Waters, placement office director.

"Caterpillar has been annually donating to the placement office for many years, and we truly appreciate their willingness to invest in WIU students," Waters said. "We've used the awards to upgrade our resource library, conduct programs for students and assist with staff development.

"In addition to the annual award, Caterpillar provided funding for the initial publication of our Careers and Choices books, which are distributed throughout Illinois secondary school systems and community college systems," Waters added.

Julie Peterson, a 1979 WIU graduate, and Darrell Harrell, from Caterpillar's office of information services, presented the donation to Waters.


Caterpillar Foundation Donates to Placement Office

The Caterpillar Foundation recently donated $1,000 to the WIU Occupational Information and Placement Office.

The donation reflected a 25 percent increase over previous years awards, according to Al Waters, placement office director.

"Caterpillar has been annually donating to the placement office for many years, and we truly appreciate their willingness to invest in WIU students," Waters said.

"We've used the awards to upgrade our resource library, conduct programs for students and assist with staff development.

"In addition to the annual award, Caterpillar provided funding for the initial publication of our Careers and Choices books, which are distributed throughout Illinois secondary school systems and community college systems," Waters added

Julie Peterson, a 1979 WIU graduate, and Darrell Harrell, from Caterpillar's office of information services, presented the donation to Waters.


Campus Briefs

‘COOL' Haunted Hall Open to Campus, Public

Halloween fun for all ages is being planned by WIU students, who will donate all proceeds from the event to the United Way of McDonough County.

The third annual Corbin/Olson Complex (COOL) Haunted Hall will be held tonight, Oct. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 31 on the third floor of Olson Hall.

Kids hour, with the lights on, will be held each night from 7 to 8 p.m. Then it's lights off for the older crowd each night from 8 to 11 p.m.

The cost is $3 for adults, $2 for junior high and senior high students and $1 for WIU students with an ID. Kids under 12 are free.

For more information, contact Lisa Chalmers, 298-3207, or Jenna Collins, 298-3540.

Exchange Teaching Positions Available in Japan

Applications are available for college graduates (by June 1999) to see and experience life in Japan while assisting in the teaching of English or working for a local government in paid positions on the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program, according to Jim Conger, WIU Study Abroad Program adviser.

The JET program is a Japanese government sponsored program, now in its 13th year. Two kinds of positions are available. One position is assistant language teachers (ALT), who assist in teaching English at junior and senior high schools. Knowledge of Japanese is not required. The second position, which does require Japanese fluency, is coordinator for international relations (CIR) at a local government office.

College graduates of any major who are under age 35 are eligible. Skills required are flexibility, outgoing attitude, adaptability, interest in Japanese culture and people and knowledge of own culture.

Applications are available in the Study Abroad Office, Horrabin Hall 5, 298-1864. Application deadline is Tuesday, Dec. 8.

Kid's Day Out Nov. 11

On Veterans' Day, Wednesday, Nov. 11, students in RPTA 332 will host Kid's Day Out in the Union.

WIU faculty, staff and students whose children attend school in grades K–8, may enroll their children in the all-day program. Special activities are planned for the children during this school holiday. Cost is $10 for the day.

Call 298-1967 for more information, or e-mail Paula_Stull@ccmail.wiu.edu.

Art Gallery

Sculpture by Urbana artist Chris Berti and WIU art instructor Yukiko Muroe will be on display through Thursday, Nov. 19 at the WIU Art Gallery.

Berti, an associate art professor at Parkland College who is currently a visiting artist in the WIU department of art, will exhibit carved stone, brick and wood sculptures. His sculptures are representational, having metaphorical associations with artifacts and the natural world.

Muroe's works include ceramic sculptures representing the human figure, with an interest in the specific emotional expression of unconscious movements and gestures of the body in daily life.

The WIU Art Gallery, located north of Sherman Hall, is open free to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays and from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays during exhibitions. For more information, call 298-1587.

Haunted Trail This Weekend

Area children can experience the thrills and chills of creatures lurking in the dark along the Haunted Trail from 7 to 11 p.m. tonight, Oct. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 31 at WIU's Horn Field Campus.

Sponsored by the Student Recreation Society, the event includes shuttle-bus transportation from the Macomb Jr.-Sr. High School parking lot to Horn Field Campus.

Tickets are $5 for anyone 12 years of age or older. Any child aged seven to 12 who is accompanied by a paid adult will be charged $3. Children under seven years old can enjoy a craft room for $1.

Call 298-1967 for more information.


Campus Connection - October 30, 1998
Faculty and Staff Section

Table of Contents

Summer Stipends

The WIU Foundation is accepting applications for summer 1999 stipends.

The program has been expanded to include five new stipends from the Office of Sponsored Projects. It now includes up to 10 stipend awards of $2,500 each, available for summer 1999 research, creative and professional enhancement.

The program provides opportunity for selected faculty to engage in projects of significant scholarly or creative activity not easily pursued during regular academic sessions.

Stipends are awarded through the WIU Foundation, with line item support from Faculty Development and the Office of Sponsored Projects. The deadline is noon Friday, Nov. 13.

Application forms and guidelines are available from the WIU Foundation.

Call Lu Hutson, 298-1808, for details.


Faculty Senate

The next meeting of the Faculty Senate will be at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3 in the Union Capitol Rooms.


Publications

Paul Nollen, biological sciences, with colleagues from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, authored "Light, Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscope Observation of Body Spines of Philophthalmus Lucipetus (Trematoda) During Maturation in the Eye Cavity of Birds," published in vol. 43, pages 111-115 of Acta Parasitologica.


Professional Activities

Laura M. Barden, biological sciences, along with students Melissa Johnson, Bridget McNassar and Courtney Stone, presented "Open-Inquiry Biology Labs" at the Illinois Science Teachers Association Annual Convention in Rosemont.

Barden, along with students Michael Anderson, Michele Bustos, Kara Downs and Laura Nash, and Stacey L. Cook and Kim Pressey, recent WIU biological sciences graduates, presented "A Potpourri of Biology Activities" at the convention.

Tracy Davis, counselor education and college student personnel, was an invited presenter of "The Effectiveness of a Sex Role Socialization-Focused Date Rape Prevention Program Designed Specifically for College Men" at the International Conference on Sexual Assault and Harassment on Campus in Orlando, FL.

Egla Hassan, theatre, presented two public addresses "The Nature of Creativity" and "Portrait of an Artist" as part of The Umble Master Class at Goshen College in Indiana. Hassan also taught classes and led workshops in auditions, character development and scoring in Goshen College's theatre department

Keren M. Humphrey, counselor education and college student personnel, presented "Grief Counseling with College Students" at the annual conference of Southern College Counseling Center Personnel at Jekyll Island, GA.

The following faculty from the department of English and journalism participated in the Illinois Association of Teachers of English fall conference.

Alice Robertson presented "The Language of Instruction: What Do Our Assignments Say About Us as Teachers?"

Hallie Lemon, Bruce Leland and Zach Waggoner presented the session "Beyond the Traditional Journal: Exploring Electronic Literacy," chaired by Diana Gabbert.

Don Powers, elementary education and reading, presented with the following students at the Illinois Science Teachers Association Annual Convention in Rosemont.

Kelly Sedam, "Tie-dye Chromatography;"

Lisa Venvertloh, "Meeting Science Standards Through Simple Electricity Activities;"

Sara Burmeister, "Sink & Float Through the Constructivist's Eyes."

Phyllis Zerull, adviser, College of Business and Technology at the WIU Regional Center, presented "High School Connections–TESTing is Not Just a Four-Letter Word," at the National Orientation Directors Association (NODA) national conference in Austin, TX.

M. Ismael K. Maung, sociology and anthropology, presented "Female Labor Participation in Myanmar" at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in San Francisco.

Lisa N. Reimler, theatre, presented and chaired two panels at the Association for Theatre of Higher Education (ATHE) conference in San Antonio. They were "In the Company of Women: Case Studies Examining the Directing Process from a Female Perspective" and "Religion Within Secular Walls: Devising a Harmonious Working Relationship."


Grants

Laura Barden and P. James Nielsen, biological sciences, received $52,000 from the Illinois State Board of Education for "Open-Ended Labs Using Separation Techniques."

Mike Romano, biological sciences, received $19,195 from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources for "Fall 1998 Turkey Check Station Project."

Danny Terry, agriculture, received $12,500 from the Illinois Soybean Program Operating Board for "Operating Support 99."


Service and Awards

John Simmons, philosophy and religious studies, served as the WIU delegate to the Phi Kappa Phi National Triennial Conference held at Penn State University. He is the current WIU Phi Kappa Phi Chapter president.

Joe Coelho, biological sciences, won second place in the sports column division of the Illinois Press Association annual competition among Class A newspapers. Coelho's outdoor column, "The Sporting Life," appears in the Colchester Chronicle, Blandinsville Star-Gazette, Augusta Eagle and Tri-County Scribe (Plymouth).

Robert Sutton, history, was awarded the Donald Pitzer Distinguished Service award by the Communal Studies Association. Sutton was honored for his work as editor of the association's newsletter, which highlights activities at historical sites and contemporary communities, news and other items.

WIU's School of Extended and Continuing Education (SECE) has received three awards from Region IV of the University Continuing Education Association (UCEA). The awards were presented at the Arsenal Club in Rock Island in conjunction with the UCEA Region IV Annual Conference in September.

Physical education professor David Beaver received the Region IV Faculty Service Award.

Beaver was recognized for his partnership with WIU Non-Credit Programs in offering the National Conference on Adapted Physical Activity, held annually on the WIU campus. He was also honored for significant national and international achievements in his career as a teacher, editor, administrator and coach in the field of adapted recreation for individuals with physical disabilities.

Mary Jensen, special education professor, Joyce Nielsen, SECE associate dean, and Roberta Morelli, independent study assistant director, received the Region IV Creative Credit Program Award for the teleclass series "Special Education 431G: Characteristics of Behavior Disorders." The 25-part series, produced and directed by Roger Kent, associate director of television for WIU's Center for the Application of Information Technology, is an adaptation of a course that Jensen regularly teaches on campus. In a video format, the course is available to placebound students enrolled in the WIU Independent Study Program.

Nereida Avendano, assistant director of the WIU Hispanic Program, received the Region IV Creative Non-Credit Program Award for "Parental Awareness Workshops," a series of programs in the Quad Cities offered to improve Hispanic parental involvement in public schools.


A University Relations Publication