Graduate Studies

GIS Analysis
2018-2019

Gainful employment information

Biology Chairperson: Ranessa L. Cooper
Biology Graduate Committee Chairperson: Ranessa L. Cooper
Coordinator of Ecological GIS Certificate Program: Richard Musser
Biology Office: 372 Waggoner Hall
Biology Telephone: (309) 298-1546 Fax Number:  (309) 298-2270
Biology E-mail: biology@wiu.edu
Biology website: wiu.edu/biology
Geography Chairperson: Samuel K. Thompson
Geography Graduate Committee Chairperson: Sunita George
Coordinator of GIS Applications Certificate Program: Yongxin Deng
Geography Office: Tillman Hall 313
Geography Telephone: (309) 298-1648
Geography E-mail: geography@wiu.edu
Geography website: wiu.edu/geography
Location of Program Offering: Macomb, Quad Cities

Program Description

This interdisciplinary, skill based program is designed to train students to become qualified GIS analysts in their specific specialty fields or disciplines. Students pursuing this certificate will gain development and confidence in GIS by learning: how problems in “my” field are interpreted in GIS, how to model scientifically the geospatial world, how to use GIS tools correctly, how to design and implement a GIS project in “my” field, and how to make high-quality maps and use maps wisely for GIS story-telling.

Students will gain GIS expertise from three perspectives of GIS learning: skill development, theory set, and applications set. The certificate is oriented towards both general and advanced GIS analytical theories and techniques, with different application focuses in geospatial data analysis, biological/ecological, socioeconomic, and environmental fields.

The GIS Analysis focus of the certificate addresses application issues related to: 1) socioeconomic applications such as emergency management, health sciences, law and crimes, population mapping, sociology, transportation, precision agriculture, and urban planning; and 2) environmental applications including GIS modeling in climatology, hydrology, landscapes, natural resources, soil erosion, soil mapping, and geology. Students graduated from this program will be more extensively trained in GIS techniques and will have the opportunity to examine broad GIS applications issues, while developing GIS skills specifically useful and important in their specialty fields.

Requirements for Enrollment

Students who want the certificate must meet admission requirements.  Non-degree students must meet the admission requirements for the Graduate School; degree students must meet the admission requirements for their degree program. Students admitted to the program should have a degree in biology, geography or a related field.

Certificate Requirements

I. Core courses: 6 s.h.

GIS 405G Advanced GIS Spatial Analysis (3)
GIS 509 Fundamentals of GIS Analysis (3)

II. Select one from the following: 3 s.h.

BIOL 452G Biological Applications of GIS (3)
GIS 407G Social Applications of GIS (3)
GIS 408G Environmental Applications of GIS (3)
GIS 609 GIS Research and Application Methods (3)

III. Select any three from the following: 9 s.h.

Biology:
BIOL 425G Conservation Biology (3)
BIOL/GEOG 426G Conservation and Management of Natural Resources (3)
BIOL 452G Biological Applications of GIS (3)
BIOL 453G Streams Ecology (3)
BIOL 454G Mississippi River Ecology (3)
BIOL 456G Fire/Disturbance Ecology (3)
BIOL/GEOG 459G Biogeography (3)
BIOL 479G Tropical Ecology (3)
BIOL 584 Advanced Ecological Techniques (3)
BOT 451G Plant Ecology (3)
MICR 451G Environmental Microbiology (3)
ZOOL 451G Advanced Topics in Animal Ecology (3)

Geography:
GIS 402G Advanced Cartography (3)
GIS 403G Advanced Remote Sensing (3)
GIS 404G Advanced Quantitative Methods and Applications in GIS (3)
GIS 407G Social Applications of GIS (3)
GIS 408G Environmental Applications of GIS (3)
GIS 410G Applied GIScience (3)
GIS 609 GIS Research and Application Methods (3)
GEOG 440G Connections: A Geography of Transportation (3)
GEOG 510 Environmental Impact Analysis (3)

Political Science:
POLS 490G Public Policy Analysis and Bureaucracy (3)
POLS 493G Seminar in Organization Theory and Behavior (3)
POLS 494G Public Budgeting (3)
POLS 546 Public Administration (3)
POLS 549 Public Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation (3)
POLS 550 Nonprofit Management (3)
POLS 567 Ethics in the Public Sector (3)

Recreation, Park & Tourism:
RPTA 481G Management of Outdoor Recreation Resources (3)
RPTA 487G Site Planning (3)
RPTA 488G Park Open Space Planning (3)

Sociology and Anthropology:
ANTH 405G Forensic Anthropology (3)
ANTH 410G Anthrozoology (3)
ANTH 420G Cultural Feast (3)
SOC 414G Population (3)
SOC 425G Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 430G Sociology of Women’s Health (3)
SOC 463G Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 465G Deviance, Crime, and Control in Socio-Historical Perspective (3)
SOC 471G Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 565 Sociology of Health and Medicine (3)

TOTAL: 18 s.h.

Course Descriptions

Anthropology (ANTH)

405G Forensic Anthropology. (3) Forensic Anthropology deals with the medicolegal problem of identifying human skeletal remains. This course provides an elementary understanding of human skeletal biology, forensic archaeology, and the recovery and identification procedures involved when unknown skeletal remains are discovered. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or permission of the instructor.

410G Anthrozoology. (3) Anthrozoology examines human-animal relationships from the perspective of anthropology with an emphasis on culture and its influence on attitudes toward animals. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or permission of instructor.  Successful completion of a course in research methods is highly recommended.

420G Cultural Feast: The Anthropology of Food. (3) Anthropological study of food symbolism, rules, consumption, health, and the gendered dimensions of food, including gathering, preparation and distribution, and commoditization of food. Issues of scarcity and links to environmental sustainability, global social hierarchies, and power relations are also addressed. Prerequisite: ANTH 110.

425G Culture and Catastrophe: The Anthropology of Disaster. (3) Introduces critical theoretical and methodological approaches in the anthropological study of disasters. Examines human preparedness and response to disaster events, issues of social stratification and inequality, and environmental and social forces that influence vulnerability and social policy from an international perspective. Prerequisite: ANTH 110.

Biology (BIOL)

425G Conservation Biology. (3) Biology of small, endangered populations. Genetic and ecological consequences of small population size, reserve design, and intervention to reduce extinction risk. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICRO 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); BIOL 340, or BIOL 350, or permission of the instructor.

426G (cross-listed with GEOG 426G) Conservation and Management of Natural Resources. (3) Problems in the conservation and management of natural resources, including soil, water, rangeland, forest, wildlife, air, and energy resources. Special attention to resource problems of the United States. Prerequisites: Two courses in geography or permission of the instructor.

452G Biological Applications of GIS. (3) This course deals with biological problems examined using data acquisition and analytical methods from geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS). Prerequisites: One biology course, and either GEOG 208 or GEOG 508.

453G Streams Ecology. (3) Structure and function in lotic ecosystems is emphasized in this course. Physical, chemical, and biotic factors used in stream classification will be examined. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); and either an ecology course or permission of the instructor.

454G Mississippi River Ecology. (3) A study of the structure and function of abiotic and biotic components of a major river system. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how components interact and are influenced by activities related to human interdiction. Prerequisites: One year of biology or permission of the instructor.

456G Fire/Disturbance Ecology. (3) This course examines the role of fire and other disturbances on the distribution and ecology of plants, animals, and microbes in their natural environments. Opportunity for The Nature Conservancy’s prescribed burn and Federal basic wildlife firefighter’s certifications will be available. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of the instructor.

459G (cross-listed with GEOG 459G) Biogeography. (3) Study of the geographical distributions of organisms, the evolutionary and ecological processes underlying the patterns of distribution, and the role of biogeography in biological conservation. Prerequisites: BOT 200, ZOOL 200, or permission of the instructor.

479G Tropical Ecology. (3) Introduction to tropical ecology. This course may include travel to a tropical site. Students will be responsible for trip expenses. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of the instructor.

584 Advanced Ecological Techniques. (3) This course provides instruction on the applications of techniques and analytical methods to the evaluation and restoration of terrestrial and aquatic communities, including data analysis specific to those techniques. Includes field experience. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Botany (BOT)

451G Plant Ecology. (3) Relationships of plants to their environment, community ecology and the use of quantitative methods to determine distribution. Field trip estimate: $25. Prerequisites: BOT 200, ZOOL 200, and BOT 210 or 410; graduate standing in biology.

Geographic Information Science (GIS)

402G Advanced Cartography. (3) Advanced map compilation; theory and practice of cartographic design emphasizing thematic mapping, geovisualization, and map communication using geographic information systems. Prerequisites: GIS 202 or permission of the instructor.

403G Advanced Remote Sensing. (3) Digital image processing techniques for thematic information extraction from remotely-sensed data for environmental applications. Laboratory. Prerequisites: GIS 202, or permission of the instructor.

404G (formerly 406G) Advanced Quantitative Methods and Applications in GIS. (3) Introduction to statistical approaches in GIS to measure geographic distributions, identify geographic patterns and spatial clusters, and analyze geographic relationships. Prerequisites: GIS 202 and GEOG 301; or permission of the instructor.

405G (formerly 409G) Advanced GIS Spatial Analysis. (3) Emphasis upon GIS modeling based upon coordinate-based spatial data.  Integration of raster-based GIS data and concepts when appropriate for the solutions of vector-based problems. Laboratory.Prerequisites: GEOG 202 or 209 or equivalent.

407G Social Applications of GIS. (3) Examination of GIS concepts and skills in studying the geospatial characteristics of social phenomena, such as population geography, geographic segregation of neighborhoods, and spatial patterns of crimes. Practice of GIS applications in sociodemographic issues through lab exercises and course project. Prerequisite: GIS 202 or permission of the instructor.

408G Environmental Applications of GIS. (3) GIS modeling of the biophysical environment, including water flow simulation, mapping of soils and climates, habitat delineation, and soil erosion modeling. Review of GIS methods, literature, and practice of environmental analysis in labs and project. Laboratory.  Prerequisites: GIS 202; and GEOG 301 or STAT 171 or equivalent.

410G Applied GIScience. (3) Examination of real-world applications of GIS, remote sensing, and GPS, including issues in the associated literature and principles. Fostering ideas and practicing skills of designing and completing GIScience projects scientifically. Prerequisites: GIS 202 and 405 or permission of the instructor.

509 Fundamentals of GIS Analysis. (3) An introduction to geographic information system (GIS) analysis tools. Students will learn theory and techniques that will be applied to project(s) associated to their discipline. Prerequisite: GEOG 508.

609 GIS Research and Application Methods. (3) How to use GIS concepts, tools, and methods correctly in research activities of various disciplinary and application backgrounds. Examine existing GIS applications in your own field and conduct “hands-on” exercises by designing and completing a GIS project individually. Prerequisite: GEOG 508.

Geography (GEOG)

426G (cross-listed with BIOL 426G) Conservation and Management of Natural Resources. (3) Problems in the conservation and management of natural resources, including soil, water, rangeland, forest, wildlife, air, and energy resources. Special attention to resource problems of the United States. Prerequisites: Two courses in geography or permission of the instructor.

440G Connections: A Geography of Transportation. (3) Introduction to transport systems at various geographic scales in society, and the concepts, methods and application areas of Transport Geography. Prerequisites: GIS 202 and GEOG 301 or permission of the instructor.

459G (cross-listed with BIOL 459G) Biogeography. (3) Study of the geographical distributions of organisms, the evolutionary and ecological processes underlying the patterns of distribution, and the role of biogeography in biological conservation. Prerequisites: BOT 200, ZOOL 200, or permission of the instructor.

510 Environmental Impact Analysis. (3) An examination and application of methodologies and techniques in assessing physical, economic, and social effects of development. Prerequisite: GEOG 405 or permission of the instructor.

Microbiology (MICR)

451G Microbial Ecology. (3) Ecobiology of the major microbial groups and their role in processing carbonaceous and geochemical elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) and MICR 200 (C grade or better); graduate standing in biology.

Political Science (POLS)

490G Public Policy Analysis and Bureaucracy. (3) The role of the public bureaucracy in the policy-making and policy-formation process. Legislative and judicial policy-making is contrasted with administrative policy making.

493G Seminar in Organization Theory and Behavior. (3) Review of classical and modern theories of administration. Goals and expectations of high echelon administrators and analysis of authority relationships in formal organizations are emphasized.

494G Public Budgeting. (3) Financial and budgetary processes and problems of public agencies at various governmental levels. Includes types and functions of budgets. Systematic program evaluation and budgetary allocation questions are emphasized.

546 Public Administration. (3) (Colloquium) This course provides an overview of the problems and issues that confront public administrators and introduces contemporary public management theory and skills for dealing with the problems and issues.

549 Public Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation. (3) Analysis of the processes of policy formation, policy contents, and outcomes of a number of domestic policy areas and niches.

550 Nonprofit Management. (3) This course will focus on defining and categorizing the third sector and then exploring its relationship to the public sector as value guardians.  Considerable attention will be paid to the role nonprofits play in the formulation and execution of public policy.

567 Ethics in the Public Sector. (3) This course will examine the ethical dimensions of the public sector through an administrative responsibility lens. Administrative responsibility will be explored through examination of the principles of responsiveness, fairness, flexibility, honesty, accountability, and competence.

Recreation, Park and Tourism Administration (RPTA)

481G Human Dimensions of Resource Management. (3) Considers theory and practice for human dimensions oriented use of land, water, and wildlife resources for recreation experiences. Examines social and physical carrying capacity of land and cultural treatment of ecological systems. Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate status or permission of the instructor.

487G Site Planning in Recreation and Parks. (3) Introduction to basic planning principles and techniques as they apply to park and recreation projects. Special consideration given to the use of GIS and GPS technology and field techniques. Emphasis on problem solving in the planning process.Laboratory charge and field trip required. Prerequisite: Upper division status or permission of the instructor.                                                 

488G Open Space Management. (3) Investigates theory, principles, and methods of planning recreation land systems. Explores procedures to preserve, acquire, and develop recreation lands and green space throughout a district or urban area. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Sociology (SOC)

414G Population. (3) The distribution, growth, and characteristics of human population and its relationship to social organization. Prerequisites: Two courses in Sociology including SOC 100 or 510.

425G Juvenile Delinquency. (3) A survey of theories of causation relating to juvenile delinquency and an analysis of the development of history of the juvenile court in America and the relationship of that system to rehabilitation prospects, detention facilities, police behavior, and various social institutions. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or 510, SOC 200, or permission of the instructor.

430G (cross-listed with WS 430G) Sociology of Women’s Health. (3) Uses sociological theories and research to examine the gendered experience of illness. Includes sociological analysis of medical knowledge about women’s health. Topics include medicalization of women’s health, the gendered hierarchy of professions, and feminist critiques of scientific research.

463G Sociology of Law. (3) An analysis of the social origin of law, the effects of law on human behavior, inter-relations between law and other social institutions, and of the relationship between law and social change. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 510.

465G Deviance, Crime, and Control in Socio-Historical Perspective. (3) Historical conceptions of deviance; origin of prisons, asylums; emergence of police; rates and types of deviance and varieties of social control in particular historical periods. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or 510 and two additional sociology and anthropology courses.

471G Urban Sociology. (3) City life forms and the alternative structures of complex societies; special arrangements, systems of decision making; belief formation, energy use, communication, socialization, and control. History of urban growth, ecology, complex organization, and sources of cohesion. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or 510 and three additional courses in sociology and anthropology.

565 Sociology of Health and Medicine.  (3) An examination of the field of health and medicine including the self, illness and wellness; caregiver and client relationships; total institutions; demography and epidemiology and examination of health care.

Zoology (ZOOL)

451G Advanced Topics in Animal Ecology. (3) Relationships of animals in their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 350, ZOOL 200, ENG 280; graduate standing in biology.