Academics

Biological Sciences: A Signature Academic Program

Program Details

Biology is one of the most basic fields of science with direct application to humans. Our continued existence on the planet Earth depends in large part on how we resolve problems of a biological nature. Biology is a broadly based discipline encompassing a variety of subjects ranging from medicine to ecology. The Biology program at WIU is designed to provide students with a broad exposure to the various areas of Biology.

Majors are offered in Biology (with options in Botany, Environmental Biology, Microbiology, Zoology, Medical Sciences, and Science/Biology Teacher Education) and Clinical Laboratory Science leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. Minors are offered in Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology.

Special Opportunities in Biological Sciences

Dr. Alice Kibbe, a well-known botanist, had a dream of starting a field station to promote teaching and research in field biology and ecology. Her ideals of promoting teaching, research, and conservation are the cornerstones on which the Alice L. Kibbe Life Science Station has been built. The Kibbe Life Science Station rests on 1,689 acres of natural area along the Mississippi River owned by Western, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, and the Illinois Chapter of the Nature Conservancy. The facilities provide housing for 48 people, a community kitchen, a large gathering room, and two classrooms.

Biology majors have the opportunity to take classes in popular countries such as Australia, Finland, China, New Zealand, and England. Previous Biology students have traveled to Costa Rica and studied the tropical environment, ecosystems, and habitats.

Biology students can participate in several departmental organizations such as the Wildlife Society, Sportsman’s Club, Tri-Beta, Botany Club, Pre-Professional Club, and the Fishing Club. A wide variety of student activities and organizations are available to all Western students. Learn more at wiu.edu/osa.

Department Minors

  • Chemistry
  • Botany
  • Horticulture
  • Microbiology
  • Middle-Level Science Teaching
  • Zoology

Additional Resources

biology lab

WIU offers hands-on experience in biology labs to help prepare you for your career.

Possible Biological Sciences Career Paths

Training in Biology prepares one for a broad spectrum of job opportunities, including teaching, governmental or industrial laboratories, conservation agencies, or business. In addition, students become qualified to pursue graduate studies in any of several areas of study within the Biological Sciences and the health professions.

Graduates in the Science/Biology Teacher Education option typically begin their teaching careers upon graduation while a few opt for other related careers. In addition to careers in teaching at public and private schools, graduates are also sought as corporate trainers; education specialists in nontraditional settings such as parks, museums, zoos (may require a zoo and aquaria certificate depending upon the site); tutors; online teachers; as well as other positions needing an individual who possesses excellent people skills, ability to educate others, and a strong content background.

Course Descriptions

Please refer to the undergraduate catalog for detailed program information and course requirements.

BIOLOGY (BIOL)

100 Biological Concepts. (4) (General Education/ Natural Sciences) A laboratory course recommended for nonscience majors, relating reproduction, heredity, evolution, ecology, and behavior to human life and the problems of society. This General Education curriculum course does not count toward a major or minor in Biology. IAI: L1 900L.

101 Biological World. (4) (General Education/ Natural Sciences) A laboratory course recommended for nonscience majors, dealing with the structure and function of the human body and with selected aspects of microbes, plants, and animals and how they affect humans. This General Education curriculum course does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.

170 Introduction to Health Careers. (1) Career opportunities in the health professions will be discussed. Vertical and lateral mobilities and education requirements will be stressed.

181 (Cross-listed with GEOL 181) Integrated Science I. (4) (General Education/Natural Sciences) A laboratory course in interdisciplinary science with an emphasis on the nature and evolution of life and Earth. Topics include ecology, natural resources, formation of Earth materials, Earth processes, nutrient cycling, cell biology, genetics, and evolution. (Integrated Science II is PHYS/GEOG 182) Not open to students with credit in GEOL 181. Prerequisite: MATH 099N.

204 Human Biology. (4) (General Education/ Natural Sciences) An introduction to basic human biology including human development, reproduction, aging, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Laboratory experiments include online simulations and/or purchased kits for homework. This course will not count toward a Biology major.

281 Introduction to Science Teaching. (1) Designed for students interested in teaching science. Through this course, students will gain experience with lab safety, with lesson planning, and in field observations. Prerequisite: at least one introductory level science course with a grade of B or higher OR permission of the instructor.

312 (Formerly BIOL 419) Evolution. (3) A detailed study of the mechanisms of evolution. Prerequisites: BIOL 330, 340; BOT 200 (C grade or better); ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

330 Cell and Molecular Biology. (4) Morphological and functional aspects of the cell. Lecture and lab will emphasize cell structure and how this relates to physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

340 Genetics and Evolutionary Biology. (4) Lecture and lab emphasizing transmission genetics, genetic mapping, and the genetic processes underlying evolutionary processes. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); ENG 280.

350 General Ecology. (4) This course examines the causes of patterns in the abundance and distribution of organisms at the population, community, ecosystem, landscape, and global levels. The relationships of ecological principles to environmental issues will be examined. Prerequisites: Two of the following—BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

425 Conservation Biology. (3) Biology of small, endangered populations. Genetic and ecological consequences of small population size, reserve design, and intervention to reduce extinction risk. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); BIOL 340 or 350, or permission of the instructor.

426 (Cross-listed with GEOG 426) Conservation and Management of Natural Resources. (3) Problems in the conservation and management of natural resources including soil, water, rangeland, forest, wildlife, air, and energy resources. Special attention to resource problems of the United States. Not open to students with credit in GEOG 426. Prerequisites: GEOG 121 and METR 120, or consent of instructor.

435 Radiation Biology. (3) Topics vary and may include: molecular genetics, regulation of protein synthesis, mutagenesis, gametogenesis, and genetic control of differentiation and morphogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOL 340; one year of Chemistry and Physics.

451 Ecological Techniques. (3) Techniques and analytical methods used to examine terrestrial and aquatic communities are studied, including data analysis specific to those techniques. Includes field experience. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or permission of the instructor.

452 Biological Applications of GIS. (3) This course deals with biological problems examined using data acquisition and analytical methods from geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS). Prerequisites: One Biology course and GEOG 208.

453 Streams Ecology. (3) Structure and function in lotic ecosystems is emphasized in this course. Physical, chemical, and biotic factors used in stream classification will be examined. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), and either an ecology course or permission of the instructor.

454 Mississippi River Ecology. (3) Students will be given an opportunity to study the structure and function of major abiotic and biotic components of a major river system. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how the components interact and are influenced by activities related to human interdiction. Prerequisite: one year of Biology of permission of the instructor.

456 (Formerly BOT 455) Fire/Disturbance Ecology. (3) This course examines the role of fire and other disturbances on the distribution and ecology of plants, animals, and microbes in their natural environments. Opportunity for the Nature Conservancy’s prescribed burn and Federal basic wildland firefighter’s certifications will be available. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of the instructor.

458 Plant-Animal Interactions. (3) Explores the co-evolutionary relationships of plants and animals. Lecture topics will include herbivory, pollination biology, and dispersal. Lab emphasis will be placed on research experiments that utilize chemical, behavioral, and molecular techniques, and review of the scientific literature. Prerequisite: BIOL 330, BOT 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of instructor.

459 (Cross-listed with GEOG 459) Biogeography. (3) Study of the geographical distributions of organisms, the evolutionary and ecological processes underlying the patterns of distribution, and the role of biogeography in biological conservation. Not open to students with credit in GEOG 459. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of instructor.

466 Biotechnology. (3) Issues covering the genetic and cellular manipulation of organisms to produce natural products and processes that are of major economic, environmental, and social importance will be examined. Laboratory projects involve DNA manipulation of bacteria. Prerequisites: MICR 200 (C grade or better), and one of the following: BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of the instructor. 470 Seminar. (1, repeatable to 2) Seminar for senior Biology majors.

476 Special Topics. (3, repeatable for different topics to 9 s.h.) This course explores a topic in biology of current interest. See course schedule for description. Only 6 s.h. may count toward a major. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

477 Research Experience in Biology. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Research experience with a Biological Sciences faculty member. A final report and/ or seminar may be required. Maximum of 3 s.h. may be applied to major or minor. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better). Arrange research project with faculty member and department chair before registration.

478 Honors Thesis in Biological Sciences. (3) A thesis prepared under the direction of one or more faculty members. Satisfactory oral defense of thesis required before credit is given for the course. Prerequisites: Honors major in Biology with senior standing; completion of BOT/ZOOL/MICR 477H.

479 Tropical Biodiversity. (3) Introduction to tropical biodiversity, ecology, and evolution. Includes a required field trip to a pre-determined site in the tropics. Students will be responsible for trip expenses. Prerequisite: BOT 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), and permission of instructor.

495 Internship in Biology. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Practical experience in the Biological Sciences with an approved employer. 40 contact hours per credit hour and a written report are required. Maximum of 3 s.h. may be applied to major or minor. Prerequisites: 60 s.h. and permission of the department chair. Graded S/U only.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES EDUCATION

239 Pre-Teacher Education Program Admittance. (0, repeatable with no maximum) Students pursuing teacher licensure are required to take this course in the semester they plan to be fully accepted in the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Students must meet established departmental criteria for admittance to TEP. Graded S/U.

339 Pre-Student Teaching Clearance. (0) Students pursuing teacher licensure are required to take this course prior to their student teaching semester. Students must meet established criteria for departmental clearance to student teach. Prerequisites: Full admittance to the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Graded S/U.

439 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science. (3) Study of secondary teaching methods (Grades 6–12) from the standpoints of theory and practice, curriculum objectives and standard implementation, materials, and evaluation and assessment. Included are demonstrations, discussions, lectures, classroom participation, and field observations. Prerequisites: BIOL/GEOL 181 or GEOG/PHYS 182, BIOL 281, and EIS 301 (all with C grade or better). Corequisite: EIS 303.

469 Pre-Licensure Clearance. (0) Students pursuing teacher licensure are required to take this course in the semester they student teach. Students must meet criteria established by the department in order to be recommended for licensure. Prerequisite: departmental clearance to student teach. Corequisite: Student Teaching (STCH). Graded S/U.

480 Student Teaching. See STCH 480.

481 Techniques and Issues in Science Teaching. (3) An interdisciplinary course wherein preservice middle and high school science teachers develop techniques and resources appropriate for their instructional program, deepen understanding of scientific concepts, and examine lab safety. Requires involvement in several professional development activities outside of class time. Prerequisites: EDUC 439 and ENG 280 or equivalent. Corequisite: BIOL 482.

482 (Cross-listed with CHEM 482 and PHYS 482) Science in Context. (3) Interdisciplinary course for science majors in which students explore science through inquiry, the unifying principles of science, and the role of social contexts and ethics in science. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 482 or PHYS 482. Prerequisites: senior standing in one of the following science majors—Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or Meteorology; ENG 280; or permission of instructor.

BOTANY (BOT)

200 Introduction to Plant Biology. (4) (General Education/Natural Sciences) A lecture and laboratory course recommended for science majors and minors, emphasizing basic principles in plant biology including scientific inquiry, cell biology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and diversity in plant anatomy and physiology.

210 Local Flora. (3) Identification, ecology, and distribution of common trees, shrubs, flowers, and other plants of Illinois.

320 Plant Anatomy. (3) Structure and development of vascular plant organs. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

329 Plant Structure & Function. (3) A study of plant structure and function including photosynthesis, photoperiodism, tropisms, water and mineral uptake and transport, and an understanding of the angiosperm life cycle. Closed to students who have taken BOT 320 or BOT 430. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or HORT 180 or ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or consent of instructor.

410 Plant Systematics. (3) The basic systems, principles, and methods of plant systematics; the identification and classification of Illinois vascular plants. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

423 Phycology. (3) Morphology, taxonomy, physiology, genetics, and ecology of the algae, particularly freshwater forms. May not be taken by students who have completed MICR 423. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

430 Plant Physiology. (3) Physiological processes of plants as an interaction of structure, chemistry, physical characteristics, and environment. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better); ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); one year of Chemistry; ENG 280.

451 Plant Ecology. (3) Relationships of plants to their environment; community ecology and the use of quantitative methods to determine distribution. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better); BOT 210 or 410; ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); ENG 280.

452 Freshwater Biology. (3) Common freshwater organisms and some of their relationships to one another, to their environment, and to people. May not be taken by students who have completed ZOOL 452. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

463 (Cross-listed with ANTH 463) Ethnobotany. (4) (Global Issues) A survey of how indigenous people use and classify plants in comparison to modern, scientific principles of botany and plant chemistry, and the use of traditional knowledge by modern science. May require field work travel at student expense. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 463. Prerequisites: BIOL 100, 101; BOT 200 (C grade or better); ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); ANTH 110 or SOC 100; or permission of instructor.

476 Special Topics. (3–9, repeatable for different topics to 9) This course explores a topic in botany of current interest. See course schedule for description. Only 6 s.h. may count toward major. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

481 Experimental Plant Biology. (3) A laboratory oriented course providing experience in designing, implementing, analyzing, and reporting botanicallyoriented experiments. Field experiments, greenhouse experiments, and laboratory experiments will be conducted, spanning a range of investigations from plant physiology to community ecology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

MICROBIOLOGY (MICR)

200 Introductory Microbiology. (4) (General Education/Natural Sciences) A lecture and laboratory course recommended for science majors and minors, providing an introduction to microorganisms with emphasis on the biology, methodology, and applied aspect of viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and slime molds.

400 Bacteriology. (3) Cultural, morphologic, and metabolic properties and methods of isolation of bacteria as related to home and community life, industry, medicine, and agriculture. Prerequisites: one year of Chemistry; BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

401 Mycology. (3) An introduction to the biology of the fungi emphasizing their morphology, ecology, physiology, and applied aspects, as well as laboratory techniques used in isolation, culture, and identification. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of instructor.

404 Biology of Archaea. (3) Genomics, cell structure, molecular phylogenetics, life in extreme environments, biogeography, central metabolism, sulfur metabolism, methanogenesis, genetic exchange, gene expression, growth and stress physiology, biotechnology. Prerequisites: BIOL 330, 340; MICR 200 (C grade or better).

405 Virology. (3) A study of the biological characteristics of animal, plant, and bacterial viruses and the viruses which cause disease. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

423 Phycology. (3) Morphology, taxonomy, physiology, genetics, and ecology of the algae, particularly freshwater forms. May not be taken by students who have completed BOT 423. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

434 Immunology. (3) A study of antigens and antibodies, the immune response and immunity, immunologic testing, allergy and hypersensitivity, transplantation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer immunology. Laboratory includes selected immunologic techniques. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); one year of Chemistry.

451 Microbial Ecology. (3) Ecobiology of the major microbial groups and their role in processing carbonaceous and geochemical elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); ENG 280.

460 Parasitology. (3) Ecology and evolutionary relationships of parasitic eukaryotes. Emphasis on parasites of humans. May not be taken by students who have completed ZOOL 460. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

463 Pathogenic Bacteriology. (3) The study of bacteria, rickettsia, mycoplasma, and chlamydia which cause disease in humans. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

464 Medical Mycology. (3) The study of fungi which cause disease in humans. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

465 Industrial and Fermentation Microbiology. (3) Examines the commercial use and largescale cultivation of microorganisms to produce natural products and processes of major economic, environmental, and social importance. Laboratory exercises in microbial fermentation processes. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

476 Special Topics. (3, repeatable for different topics to 9 s.h.) This course explores a topic in microbiology of current interest. See course schedule for description. Only 6 s.h. may count toward a major. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

ZOOLOGY (ZOOL)

200 Introduction to Animal Biology. (4) (General Education/Natural Sciences) A lecture and laboratory course recommended for science majors and minors, emphasizing basic principles in animal biology including scientific inquiry, cell biology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and diversity in animal anatomy and physiology.

320 Vertebrate Embryology. (3) Development of the vertebrate body and its organs. Provides a basis for understanding adult anatomy. Both lecture and laboratory are descriptive. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

321 Comparative Anatomy. (3) Anatomy of the vertebrates studied from the viewpoint of their evolutionary history. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); junior standing or consent of the instructor.

325 Vertebrate Evolution. (3) The evolutionary history of the vertebrates, emphasizing macroevolutionary trends in vertebrate diversity and skeletal functional morphology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or GEOL 112 or ANTH 111.

328 Histology. (3) Microscopic study of tissues and organs of vertebrates. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

330 (Formerly ZOOL 230) Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (4) An integrated study of the organ systems of the normal human body. Subjects covered include cells, tissues, skeletal, muscular, central, and autonomic nervous systems. Laboratory includes cat dissection and appropriate physiological experiments. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 (C grade or better) or ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or MICR 200 (C grade or better), or permission of the instructor.

331 (Formerly ZOOL 231) Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (4) A continuation of ZOOL 330. The topics included are the endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, metabolic, urinary, and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: ZOOL 330.

407 Field Herpetology. (3) A course in reptile and amphibian biology, emphasizing sampling techniques used in natural environments, as well as identification, ecology, and conservation biology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

408 Field Ornithology. (3) A course devoted to the study of birds, emphasizing study techniques used in natural environments. Topics covered will include reproductive behavior, ecology, communication, systematics, and conservation. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

409 Field Entomology. (3) A course in insect biology, emphasizing sampling techniques and study of insects in natural environments, as well as insect identification, ecology, and conservation biology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

410 Ornithology. (3) Identification, biology, ecology, and life histories of birds. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better). Frequent field trips.

411 Entomology. (3) Principles of entomology, including classification, general biology, and morphology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

412 Mammalogy. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and life histories of mammals. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

413 Herpetology. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and biology of reptiles and amphibians. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

414 Ichthyology. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and life histories of fishes. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better). Estimate of field trip costs: $10.00. Outside field trips required.

415 Invertebrate Zoology. (3) A study of invertebrate form and function as it relates to taxonomy, evolution, ecology, behavior, and physiology. Laboratory will involve comparative experimental and observational approaches. Prerequisite: ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

416 Marine Mammalogy. (3) Survey of marine mammals with emphasis on taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation. Laboratory includes observational study of marine mammals at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); senior standing in Biology or a related major.

417 (Cross-listed with ANTH 417) Primate Ecology, Behavior and Evolution. (3) This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to primatology utilizing principles from anthropology, ecology, paleontology, and animal behavior. Students gain an understanding of the evolutionary history, adaptations, and conservation of primates and their habitats. Not open to students with credit in ANTH 417. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or ZOOL 200 (C grade or better) or permission of instructor. Junior standing recommended.

420 Biology of Aging. (3) Introduction to the nature and theories of aging. A study of the processes involved at the molecular, cellular, organ, and organismal levels of development and the changes that occur with time. Relationships between aging and immunity, neoplasia, and systems integration are explored. Emphasis on humans. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and 101 or BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

430 Animal Physiology. (3) Systemic physiology, concerning the functions of nervous, muscular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better); ZOOL 200 (C grade or better); one year of Chemistry; ENG 280.

432 Neurobiology. (3) Provides a quantitative understanding of neurophysiology in the context of neural systems that underlie animal behavior. Laboratory uses animal preparations and computer models. Prerequisites: MATH 123 (or higher) with a grade of C or better, and either BIOL 100 (or higher) or PSY 343 with a grade of C or better, and minimum of junior standing; or permission of instructor.

451 Advanced Topics in Animal Ecology. (3) Relationships of animals to their environment. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: BIOL 350, ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), and ENG 280.

452 Freshwater Biology. (3) Common freshwater organisms and some of their relationships to one another, to their environment, and to man. May not be taken by students who have completed BOT 452. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

460 Parasitology. (3) Ecology and evolutionary relationships of parasitic eukaryotes. Emphasis on parasites of humans. May not be taken by students who have completed MICR 460. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

461 (Cross-listed with NURS 461) Pathophysiology. (4) Alteration in physiology, pathogenesis of structure and function of the human body leading to disease, and manifestations of disease states are discussed. In addition, body system interaction is analyzed in maintaining physiological homeostasis during disease/ altered states. Not open to students with credit in NURS 461. Prerequisites: MICR 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 330 and ZOOL 331; or consent of instructor.

476 Special Topics. (3–9, repeatable for different topics to 9) This course explores a topic in zoology of current interest. See course schedule for description. Only 6 s.h may count toward major. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

485 (Cross-listed with RPTA 485) Resource Management for Fly Fisheries. (3) Students will learn trout stream ecology and management, and gain fly-fishing experience. Course includes a one-week trip to a stream for students to meet with resource professionals and to practice their skills. Not open to students with credit in RPTA 485. Prerequisite: One of the following: BOT 200 (C grade or better), MICR 200 (C grade or better), ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), RPTA 110, RPTA 111, or permission of instructor.

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (CLS): CLINICAL TOPICS IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

Hospital-based lecture and clinical laboratory courses in an accredited and affiliated school of medical technology. Students will register for 15 s.h. for Fall semester and 15 s.h. for Spring semester. Total hours approximately 30–32 s.h.

490 Clinical Chemistry I. (1–6, repeatable to maximum) Theory and practice of analytical biochemistry as applied to pathologic states, methodology, and instrumentation. Statistics as applied to reagent preparation, result determination, and quality control. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

491 Clinical Chemistry II. (1–6, repeatable to maximum) Theory and practice of analytical biochemistry as applied to specialized tests for drugs, endocrine function, and urine and body fluid analysis. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

492 Clinical Microbiology I. (1–6, repeatable to maximum) Theory and practice of the isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria in clinical specimens through cultures, morphology, biochemical, and serological reactions and their drug susceptibility. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

493 Clinical Microbiology II. (1–6, repeatable to maximum) Theory and practice of the isolation and identification of fungi, parasites, and viruses utilizing morphological, cultural, biochemical, and serological methods. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

494 Clinical Immunology. (1–5, repeatable to maximum) The study of principles of the protective and adverse aspects of cellular and humoral responses. Performance of test procedures based on antigenantibody reactions. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

495 Clinical Homeostasis. (1–4, repeatable to maximum) The study of platelets, vascular, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems related to the disease state and therapeutic monitoring. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

496 Clinical Hematology. (1–6, repeatable to maximum) The study of the formed elements of the blood and basic morphological changes due to diseases. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

497 Clinical Immunohematology. (1–5, repeatable to maximum) Theory and practice of immunohematology, including blood groups, blood transfusion, and component preparation. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

499 Selected Topics. (1–4, repeatable to maximum) Selected topics of professional significance which may include management, pathology, medico-legal aspects, and basic teaching principles. Prerequisite: acceptance for clinical education into an affiliated school of medical technology.

Contact Information

Department of Biological Sciences

Dr. Richard O. Musser, Interim Chairperson
Email: RO-Musser@wiu.edu
Location: Waggoner Hall 316
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455-1390
Phone: (309) 298-1546

Biological Sciences Website

Biological Sciences Directory

College of Arts & Sciences (CAS)

Dr. Susan Martinelli-Fernandez, Dean
Email: Martinelli-Fernandez@wiu.edu
CAS Email: cas@wiu.edu
Location: Morgan Hall 114
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455-1390
Phone: (309) 298-1828

CAS Website

Waggoner Hall