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Kimberley McClure , Ph.D.

Professor
160 Waggoner Hall
Work: 309/298-1259
Fax: 309/298-2179

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Additional Information

Education:

Dr. McClure received a B.S. in Psychology from University of Texas at El Paso (1989), M.A. in Experimental Psychology from University of Texas at El Paso (1994), and Ph.D in Applied Experimental Psychology from University of Texas at El Paso (1998). Dissertation: “The Use of Participant Free-hand Drawings and Written Verbal Descriptions as Practice for a Facial Recognition Task: Implications for Improving Eyewitness Identification Accuracy.”

Teaching:

Dr. McClure teaches undergraduate courses in Applied Psychology (Careers in Psychology Seminar), Cultural Psychology, Eyewitness Memory (Forensic Psychology Seminar), Fire Related Human Behavior, Introduction to Psychology, Psychology and Law, Research Methods II (Experimental Psychology). Dr. McClure teaches graduate courses in Advanced Psychological Statistics, Advanced Cognitive Psychology, Seminar in Applied Cognition, and Seminar in Social Cognition.

Research:

Dr. McClure specializes in taking a social-cognitive approach to the investigation of psychological phenomenon within a legal context. Her work involves issues related to eyewitness memory, detective investigations, and most recently virtual training as a teaching mechanism for law-enforcement and military personnel making decisions about the use of lethal force.

Recent Scholarly Activities:

McClure, K. A. & Myers, J. J. (2011). Social inference and the psychology of investigation: Confidence influences detectives’ perceptions of witness credibility. Under review.

McClure, K. A., Ross, D. L., & Murphy, R. L. (2011). How ‘real’ is lethal force virtual training? Officer memory and physiological stress response in the aftermath of a violent virtual encounter. Under review.

 Shaw, J. S., III, McClure, K. A., & Dykstra, J. A. (2007). Eyewitness confidence from the witnessed event through trial (371 – 397). In M. P. Toglia, J. D. Read, D. F. Ross, & R. C. L. Lindsay (Eds.) The handbook of eyewitness psychology: Memory for events (Vol. 1).

 McClure, K. A., & Shaw, J. S., III (2002). Participants' free-hand drawings of a target can influence recognition accuracy and the confidence-accuracy correlation. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 16, 387-405.

 McClure, K. A., Ross, D. L., & Murphy, R. L. (2011). The influence of deadly force virtual training on officers’ decision-making and memory. Presented at the 48th annual meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences held in Toronto, Ontario, CA.

 McClure, K. A., & Myers, J. J. (2010). The two-pronged test attenuates the effects of witness confidence on detectives’ perceptions of eyewitness credibility. Presented at the American Psychology and Law Society (Division 41, APA) for the annual conference held in Victoria, British Columbia, CA.

Higgs, T. S. & McClure, K. A. (2009). Exploring belief in a just world as a cultural world view. Presented at the 21st annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science held in San Francisco, California, USA.

McClure, K. A. & Coontz, Z. M. (2009). Eyewitness confidence influences participant-detectives’ perceptions of accuracy. Presented at the 21st annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science held in San Francisco, California, USA.

McClure, K. A., Allen, B. P., Coombs, V. T., & Shilling, A. A. (2009). Dark and sinister meets Marty sunshine: Expression, skin tone and perceiver motivation in recognizing other-race faces. Presented at the 21st annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science held in San Francisco, California, USA.

McClure, K. A., & Sanders, J. D. (2008). In-group homogeneity and out-group heterogeneity: The effects of skin tone on other- and own-race faces. Presented at the 20th annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science held in Chicago, Illinois, USA.